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Handicrafts--

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  • Fedor, Helen
    Home-Made Products in Slovakia: Main Categories In addition to artisans, there were numerous home- (folk) producers in Slovakia throughout history. They
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 12, 2010
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      "Home-Made Products in Slovakia: Main Categories"

      In addition to artisans, there were numerous home- (folk) producers in Slovakia throughout history. They produced all kinds of materials, both for their own use and to sell. By custom, weekly markets made it possible for home-producers to sell what they had saved [?] during the agricultural season.

      The most widespread category of home-products was linen woven from flax, hemp yarn, and woven cloth. The tools used to process flax and hemp were variants of those used mainly in the region of the Carpathian Mts. and Pannonia, but some types of tools and utensils (the sitting distaff with one board < http://www.munkacsy.hu/nemzetiseg/dokumentumok/dir4/154_148_35_02.jpg > and the weaver's loom) are widespread throughout Europe.

      In the 19th and 20th centuries, two basic methods of spinning were used: spinning with a spindle and spinning with a spinning wheel. Spinning with a wheel gradually spread from western Slovakia to eastern Slovakia, where it was common only during the period between the two world wars, and often, only after 1945. Spinning on a spindle was preferred because it produced a higher-quality fine yarn. The higher quality of the yarn created using a spindle made up for the speed of production on a spinning wheel.

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      Thank you, Joe, for help with the terminology.

      It's interesting that the use of a spinning wheel in the east was common only between the wars and sometimes only after 1945. My family's from the east, SE of Kos~ice. Some time after my father made it to the U.S. in 1948, he made for my brother, for a demonstration or show-and-tell at school, a model spinning wheel that's about 15" or so tall and can work. My dad did all his carpentry projects from his head or from some numbers on a piece of scratch paper, not from plans, so it was a pretty common object for him.


      H
      All opinions and reminiscences my own


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