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Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer

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  • smudsville@yahoo.com
    By the lack of response, I wondered if I had asked an improper cultural question...dlb Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: LongJohn Wayne
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 2, 2010
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      By the lack of response, I wondered if I had asked an improper cultural question...dlb
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

      -----Original Message-----
      From: LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>
      Sender: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2010 13:38:10
      To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
      Reply-To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer

      I must have missed the reply.  Could someone reiterate?

      Helen?  Martin?  Ben?

      --- On Sun, 10/31/10, Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...> wrote:

      From: Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer
      To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, October 31, 2010, 1:01 AM







       









      I am intensely interested in how "greater hungary" history and how the peoples lived, particularly hunters, which is why I picked up the above book.

       

      I recommend it with cautions. It is about a Hungarian Jewish family before, during & after WWII. The beginning is slow and the end is fast. I didn't mind the slowness because the writing style with details is immaculate. How a woman could write so knowledgeable about war is truly amazing. Much of the book or rather the war stories take place in Slovakia and Ruthenia

       

      The book reminded me a lot of "Gone With The Wind" by Margaret Mitchell, who was accused of not writing the book because it contained so much detail.

       

      The one thing I could not understand was why they called it "The Invisible Bridge".

       

      Can someone tell me why select that title and recommend more books (fiction or non-fiction) that cover greater Hungarian life, particularly hunting, from 1920 to 1955?

       

      Diana Boggs

      thevizslaksentinel.com

      vizslavizipedia.com

      vizslavizsmithsonian.com



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    • votrubam
      ... You missed nothing. The book has nothing to do with Slovakia. The country or its people come up 2-3 times in all of its about 600 pages, Kosice is
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 2, 2010
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        > I must have missed the reply.  Could someone reiterate?

        You missed nothing. The book has nothing to do with Slovakia. The country or its people come up 2-3 times in all of its about 600 pages, Kosice is spelled Kassa. It is a work of fiction, not a history book (nor, obviously, one that teaches geography), whose author did not locate her story in Slovakia.


        Martin
      • LongJohn Wayne
        Martin: Thank you as always.  I regret my ignorance. In spite of that, thank you for revealing & removing it. Indebted, Chuck ... From: votrubam
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 3, 2010
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          Martin:

          Thank you as always.  I regret my ignorance.

          In spite of that, thank you for revealing & removing it.

          Indebted,
          Chuck

          --- On Wed, 11/3/10, votrubam <votrubam@...> wrote:

          From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 12:04 AM







           









          > I must have missed the reply.  Could someone reiterate?



          You missed nothing. The book has nothing to do with Slovakia. The country or its people come up 2-3 times in all of its about 600 pages, Kosice is spelled Kassa. It is a work of fiction, not a history book (nor, obviously, one that teaches geography), whose author did not locate her story in Slovakia.



          Martin

























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        • LongJohn Wayne
          Please forgive. ... From: smudsville@yahoo.com Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer To:
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 3, 2010
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            Please forgive.

            --- On Tue, 11/2/10, smudsville@... <smudsville@...> wrote:

            From: smudsville@... <smudsville@...>
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, November 2, 2010, 8:22 PM







             









            By the lack of response, I wondered if I had asked an improper cultural question...dlb


            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry





            -----Original Message-----


            From: LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>


            Sender: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com


            Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2010 13:38:10


            To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>


            Reply-To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com


            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer





            I must have missed the reply.  Could someone reiterate?





            Helen?  Martin?  Ben?





            --- On Sun, 10/31/10, Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...> wrote:





            From: Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...>


            Subject: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer


            To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com


            Date: Sunday, October 31, 2010, 1:01 AM























             





























            I am intensely interested in how "greater hungary" history and how the peoples lived, particularly hunters, which is why I picked up the above book.





             





            I recommend it with cautions. It is about a Hungarian Jewish family before, during & after WWII. The beginning is slow and the end is fast. I didn't mind the slowness because the writing style with details is immaculate. How a woman could write so knowledgeable about war is truly amazing. Much of the book or rather the war stories take place in Slovakia and Ruthenia





             





            The book reminded me a lot of "Gone With The Wind" by Margaret Mitchell, who was accused of not writing the book because it contained so much detail.





             





            The one thing I could not understand was why they called it "The Invisible Bridge".





             





            Can someone tell me why select that title and recommend more books (fiction or non-fiction) that cover greater Hungarian life, particularly hunting, from 1920 to 1955?





             





            Diana Boggs





            thevizslaksentinel.com





            vizslavizipedia.com





            vizslavizsmithsonian.com











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          • Diana Boggs
            Me, as well. But unless one asks, you will not know. This listserv crosses cultural lines some times and some times not. I didn t read this book, I listened
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 3, 2010
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              Me, as well. But unless one asks, you will not know. This listserv crosses cultural lines some times and some times not. I didn't read this book, I listened to it which really drew me into the story without having to work at it. The reader pronounced the word "magyar" not like I thought it was pronounced. He sounded more like "medya"...dlb

              --- On Wed, 11/3/10, LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> wrote:


              From: LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, November 3, 2010, 1:10 PM


               



              Please forgive.

              --- On Tue, 11/2/10, smudsville@... <smudsville@...> wrote:

              From: smudsville@... <smudsville@...>
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, November 2, 2010, 8:22 PM

               

              By the lack of response, I wondered if I had asked an improper cultural question...dlb

              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

              -----Original Message-----

              From: LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>

              Sender: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

              Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2010 13:38:10

              To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>

              Reply-To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer

              I must have missed the reply.  Could someone reiterate?

              Helen?  Martin?  Ben?

              --- On Sun, 10/31/10, Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...> wrote:

              From: Diana Boggs <ssmudsville@...>

              Subject: [Slovak-World] "The Invisible Bridge" by Julie Orringer

              To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com

              Date: Sunday, October 31, 2010, 1:01 AM

               

              I am intensely interested in how "greater hungary" history and how the peoples lived, particularly hunters, which is why I picked up the above book.

               

              I recommend it with cautions. It is about a Hungarian Jewish family before, during & after WWII. The beginning is slow and the end is fast. I didn't mind the slowness because the writing style with details is immaculate. How a woman could write so knowledgeable about war is truly amazing. Much of the book or rather the war stories take place in Slovakia and Ruthenia

               

              The book reminded me a lot of "Gone With The Wind" by Margaret Mitchell, who was accused of not writing the book because it contained so much detail.

               

              The one thing I could not understand was why they called it "The Invisible Bridge".

               

              Can someone tell me why select that title and recommend more books (fiction or non-fiction) that cover greater Hungarian life, particularly hunting, from 1920 to 1955?

               

              Diana Boggs

              thevizslaksentinel.com

              vizslavizipedia.com

              vizslavizsmithsonian.com

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