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Handicrafts--18

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  • Fedor, Helen
    Handicraft Production in Slovakia after the Abolition of the Guilds In the 19th century, the state took more steps to restrict the guilds old privileges of
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 15, 2010
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      "Handicraft Production in Slovakia after the Abolition of the Guilds"

      In the 19th century, the state took more steps to restrict the guilds' old privileges of restricting production. The passing of the General Guild Statutes (1813) made it impossible for guilds to influence the quantity and quality of individual masters and their output. It also made possible the unrestricted engagement of apprentices, and made more allowance for crafts to be produced independently. [Very convoluted-did I get it right?] During the 1848-49 revolution, more measures were taken to restrict the influence of the guilds.

      In 1872, guilds were abolished at the same time that industrial freedom[??] was legalized. Parts of the guilds were transformed into industrial associations. Because the vast majority of artisans rejected this forced form of organization, the new Industrial Law (1884) gave craftsmen a certain degree of self-government within industrial corporations (i.e. leading[??] the apprentice agenda).

      ***************************

      Captions on the page:
      Painted chests, which were made and decorated by artisan cabinet makers, made up part of the furnishings of a village household in many Slovak areas before the middle of the 20th century.

      The production of combs and other items made of horn was widespread mainly in eastern Slovakia. Horns [the kind that make a sound] were traditional products.


      H
      All opinions my own


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • votrubam
      ... The law abolished the apprentices guilds, which had their own restrictions on membership just like the master craftsmen s guilds, and the masters guilds
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 15, 2010
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        > It also made possible the unrestricted engagement of
        > apprentices, and made more allowance for crafts to be
        > produced independently. [Very convoluted-did I get it right?]

        The law abolished the apprentices' guilds, which had their own restrictions on membership just like the master craftsmen's guilds, and the masters' guilds weren't allowed to restrict the number of members' apprentices, either, nor to limit their production.


        > In 1872, guilds were abolished at the same time that
        > industrial freedom[??] was legalized.

        The law regulated/deregulated what's an issue of interest today too:

        <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/message/30259>


        > leading[??] the apprentice agenda).

        Viest~ agendu can mean "do bookkeeping," or maintain all the records (including minutes from meetings, etc.). They may have meant that. The 1813 law appointed government officers to supervise all the guilds' activities (not limited to bookkeeping).


        Martin
      • Ron
        Helen, I am finally home and opened my copy of the book. First I must congratulate you on untangling the English in the book! ... I might say and eased the
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 15, 2010
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          Helen,

          I am finally home and opened my copy of the book. First I must congratulate you on untangling the English in the book!

          >>and made more allowance for crafts to be produced independently.
          I might say
          "and eased the ability for crafts to be produced independently"., but I consider that a minor point and hesitate to mention it. (with my words also not the best).

          >>1872 Â…Because the vast majority of artisans rejected this forced form of organization, the new Industrial Law (1884) gave craftsmen a certain degree of self-government within industrial corporations (i.e. leading[??] the apprentice agenda).

          I would take as meaning that the remnants of the Guilds were effectively stymieing the government reforms of 1872 in some areas, so the government compromised and allowed them to control apprenticeship programs within the modern industrial system. (Perhaps much as Unions have apprenticeship programs to assure adequate education and expertise on the part of workers today, determining when one reaches Journeyman status, separate from the industries within which they work).

          Ron
        • Fedor, Helen
          Ron, Thanks. Now you have some idea of what I tangle with (some parts being worse than others). It just now occurred to me that maybe what the translator
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 15, 2010
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            Ron,
            Thanks. Now you have some idea of what I tangle with (some parts being worse than others).

            It just now occurred to me that maybe what the translator wanted to say was:

            ">>1872 ...Because the vast majority of artisans rejected this forced form of organization, the new Industrial Law (1884) gave craftsmen a certain degree of self-government within industrial corporations, starting with the issue of apprentices.

            H

            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ron
            Sent: Friday, October 15, 2010 5:02 PM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Handicrafts--18



            Helen,

            I am finally home and opened my copy of the book. First I must congratulate you on untangling the English in the book!

            >>and made more allowance for crafts to be produced independently.
            I might say
            "and eased the ability for crafts to be produced independently"., but I consider that a minor point and hesitate to mention it. (with my words also not the best).

            >>1872 ...Because the vast majority of artisans rejected this forced form of organization, the new Industrial Law (1884) gave craftsmen a certain degree of self-government within industrial corporations (i.e. leading[??] the apprentice agenda).

            I would take as meaning that the remnants of the Guilds were effectively stymieing the government reforms of 1872 in some areas, so the government compromised and allowed them to control apprenticeship programs within the modern industrial system. (Perhaps much as Unions have apprenticeship programs to assure adequate education and expertise on the part of workers today, determining when one reaches Journeyman status, separate from the industries within which they work).

            Ron



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • votrubam
            ... No. The 1884 law enabled the craftsmen to organize apprenticeship in their own way, i.e., they were not bound by the previous statutes any more in this
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 15, 2010
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              > corporations, starting with the issue of apprentices.

              No. The 1884 law enabled the craftsmen to organize apprenticeship in their own way, i.e., they were not bound by the previous statutes any more in this respect as I said before. Starting from 1884, a village with 50 or more apprentices had to organize a vocational school for them, but with fewer apprentices than that in a village, it was up to the master craftsmen again how they handled apprenticeship.


              Martin
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