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Re: [Slovak-World] On food and Cooking

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  • J.B. Bulharowski
    L: No surprise there; sounds like some passages I ve read in some of my bread cookbooks. My grandmother and mom never seemed to have trouble finding time to
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 6, 2010
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      L:

      No surprise there; sounds like some passages I've read in some of my bread
      cookbooks. My grandmother and mom never seemed to have trouble finding time to
      make "fantastic" baked goods, and my mom worked full time in a dress factory.
      Those Slovak gals were/are magicians and were talented at time management. I
      never ate "boxed" food throughout my youth.

      Best,

      JB



      ________________________________
      From: Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...>
      To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sun, September 5, 2010 8:18:58 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] On food and Cooking


      I am following in Helen's footsteps and sending a little book transcription,
      this one from "On Food and Cooking". It's about bread. I am sending it because
      it completely reminds me of how surprised I was after coming to America from
      Slovakia to find all these sorry excuses for bread on supermarket shelves. In
      store bakeries were not so common back then. Here is the passage:

      "The manufacture of commercial breads bears little resemblance to the process
      described above. Ordinary mixing, kneading and fermentation require several
      hours of work and waiting from the bread maker. In bread factories, high-powered

      mechanical dough developers and chemical maturing agents (oxidizers) can produce

      a 'ripe' dough, with good aeration and gluten structure, in four minutes. Yeast
      is added to such doughs mainly as flavoring. The formed loaves are proofed
      briefly and then baked as they move through a tunnel-like metal oven. These
      breads tend to have a very fine, cakelike texture, because machines are far
      more efficient at aerating dough than are hands or stand mixers. The flavor of
      manufactured bread can sometimes be marked by such unpleasant aroma compounds as

      sour, sweat-like isovaleric and isbutyric acids, which are produced by flour and

      yeast enzymes in unbalanced amounts during intensive mixing and high-temperature

      proofing."
      -- Lubos Brieda --
      Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
      hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

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