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Re: Clarifying Slovak and German

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  • William
    I can tell you that knowledge of German on my first trip to Spis (Levoca) saved the day for me. The owners of the hotel spoke very little English and of
    Message 1 of 37 , Sep 3, 2010
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      I can tell you that knowledge of German on my first trip to Spis (Levoca) saved the day for me. The owners of the hotel spoke very little English and of course I spoke no Slovak at all. I was happy when the replied "ja, ein bischen" when I asked if they spoke German. So I think it goes without saying the German influence was strong and survives today.
      Bill

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, nhasior@... wrote:
      >
      > Frank and Ron,
      > There must have been a good deal of German influence in Slovakia. One of
      > my grandparents came from a spa village in the Kezmarok area which began in
      > the 1600's, when a shepherd boy discovered a curative spring. The local
      > people used it as a spa, its curative abilites became well known in a wider
      > area in time, and later on the Germans turned it into a fairly large health
      > resort. Sadly, it was demolished by communists in the early 1950s. Even
      > the cemetary was bulldozed.
      > Reen
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Fedor, Helen
      There are plenty of German borrowings in the eastern dialects, and they re still used: s~urc (apron), biglajs (iron for ironing), lajbik (vest), fris~tik
      Message 37 of 37 , Sep 6, 2010
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        There are plenty of German borrowings in the eastern dialects, and they're still used: s~urc (apron), biglajs (iron for ironing), lajbik (vest), fris~tik (breakfast), etc.

        H

        ________________________________________
        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William [wsmorey@...]
        Sent: Friday, September 03, 2010 8:13 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Clarifying Slovak and German

        I can tell you that knowledge of German on my first trip to Spis (Levoca) saved the day for me. The owners of the hotel spoke very little English and of course I spoke no Slovak at all. I was happy when the replied "ja, ein bischen" when I asked if they spoke German. So I think it goes without saying the German influence was strong and survives today.
        Bill

        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>, nhasior@... wrote:
        >
        > Frank and Ron,
        > There must have been a good deal of German influence in Slovakia. One of
        > my grandparents came from a spa village in the Kezmarok area which began in
        > the 1600's, when a shepherd boy discovered a curative spring. The local
        > people used it as a spa, its curative abilites became well known in a wider
        > area in time, and later on the Germans turned it into a fairly large health
        > resort. Sadly, it was demolished by communists in the early 1950s. Even
        > the cemetary was bulldozed.
        > Reen
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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