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Re: Traditional agriculture--51

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  • William
    Agree. When researching my surname I found at least three different spellings: Csmorej, Czmorej, and Cmorej. Bill
    Message 1 of 66 , Aug 4, 2010
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      Agree. When researching my surname I found at least three different spellings:
      Csmorej, Czmorej, and Cmorej.
      Bill

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "votrubam" <votrubam@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Kocz could have came from the Hungarian town of Kocs, know for
      > > it's coach builders. I have found under forced magarization "z"
      > > and "s" interchanged.
      >
      > There was no forced Magyarization/Hungarianization in the mid-18th century. The Slovak and Hungarian sounds [ts] and [tsh] used to be spelled in a variety of ways then = before the spelling of the Central European languages was substantially standardized. The combination _cz_ could easily have stood for either of the two sounds then, as could other combination of letters.
      >
      >
      > Martin
      >
    • joy2002cjm
      I agree with Lubos, your wealth of knowledge is amazing and you should create a book of sorts. Sharing your knowledge helps it to live on and enrich all of us.
      Message 66 of 66 , Aug 14, 2010
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        I agree with Lubos, your wealth of knowledge is amazing and you should create a book of sorts. Sharing your knowledge helps it to live on and enrich all of us. Thanks for sharing here.
        Carolyn


        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...> wrote:
        >
        > Martin, I am absolutely amazed by your wealth of knowledge. You should turn all
        > these little snippets into a book of some sort, it would definitely be
        > interesting reading...
        > -- Lubos Brieda --
        > Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
        > hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sat, August 7, 2010 5:26:30 PM
        > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak word conversation
        >
        > > They have gone at such lengths to codify and purify the
        > > language, why allow "lesnik" or other cases in?
        >
        > They haven't gone to any remarkable lengths, not even in pre-WW II democratic
        > Slovakia. Those pushing Czech words always prevailed. Then, after the
        > Communist coup in 1948, there was an outright "internal ban" on trying to
        > promote Slovak words against the Czech imports. Even the word _Czech_ could not
        > be used in that connection under Communism. When linguists suggested that a
        > word borrowed from Czech might not be the best option, they had to call it a
        > "bookish word," not a Czech word.
        >
        > Lesnik and similar bureaucratic words flooded in with the establishment of
        > Czecho-Slovakia and its Prague-centered government in 1918. In this instance,
        > e.g., the country-wide governmental body in charge of forests, headquartered in
        > Prague, decided to call them lesnik in Slovakia too, and that was that. That
        > was also the time, for example, when women's last names started being formally
        > registered with -ova. That's what Prague used to do and applied it in the
        > governmental offices in the whole country (including in the Rusyn Sub-Carpathia)
        > when Czecho-Slovakia was creeated.
        >
        >
        > Martin
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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