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Traditional agriculture--48

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  • Fedor, Helen
    The Wallachian Colonization, with its organized system of livestock breeding, also included the pasturing of non-bearing cows. Under the fold system, these
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 30, 2010
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      The Wallachian Colonization, with its organized system of livestock breeding, also included the pasturing of non-bearing cows. Under the fold system, these cows would be driven out to mountain pastures and ridges, where a herdsman remained with them during the entire summer grazing season. Similarly, oxen and horses also grazed in remote pastures, unless they were needed as a draft team.

      In the Central and Northern Slovak basins, sheep breeding played an important role in livestock production. In the first half of the 18th century, sheep grazed in these areas in significantly greater numbers than now. Sheep also grazed in the flatter areas of Slovakia, but their numbers increased toward the mountain areas. There were villages where one serf family kept 10-12 sheep, but there were also families who kept 20-30 sheep.

      In Slovakia, there were two kinds of sheep that were pastured during that time. The first were the so-called Wallachian sheep [http://www.classicnatureprints.com/pr.Wood%20Animals/wood.wallachian.jpg >], breeding of which prevailed on feudal estates. The second kind were the so-called birky [an aside: "birka" is a Hungarian word for sheep], which were sometimes also called Moravian or Czech sheep [??? < http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3528/3288249993_7e2c275c85.jpg >]; these were bred mainly on feudal land-estates. Birky sheep had shorter and softer wool than Wallachian sheep.

      H
      All opinions my own


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    • Margo Smith
      Which kind of sheep was kept for bryndza?  Yummy ________________________________ From: Fedor, Helen To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 31, 2010
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        Which kind of sheep was kept for bryndza?  Yummy




        ________________________________
        From: "Fedor, Helen" <hfed@...>
        To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Fri, July 30, 2010 10:46:39 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Traditional agriculture--48

         
        The Wallachian Colonization, with its organized system of livestock breeding,
        also included the pasturing of non-bearing cows. Under the fold system, these
        cows would be driven out to mountain pastures and ridges, where a herdsman
        remained with them during the entire summer grazing season. Similarly, oxen and
        horses also grazed in remote pastures, unless they were needed as a draft team.

        In the Central and Northern Slovak basins, sheep breeding played an important
        role in livestock production. In the first half of the 18th century, sheep
        grazed in these areas in significantly greater numbers than now. Sheep also
        grazed in the flatter areas of Slovakia, but their numbers increased toward the
        mountain areas. There were villages where one serf family kept 10-12 sheep, but
        there were also families who kept 20-30 sheep.

        In Slovakia, there were two kinds of sheep that were pastured during that time.
        The first were the so-called Wallachian sheep
        [http://www.classicnatureprints.com/pr.Wood%20Animals/wood.wallachian.jpg >],
        breeding of which prevailed on feudal estates. The second kind were the
        so-called birky [an aside: "birka" is a Hungarian word for sheep], which were
        sometimes also called Moravian or Czech sheep [??? <
        http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3528/3288249993_7e2c275c85.jpg >]; these were
        bred mainly on feudal land-estates. Birky sheep had shorter and softer wool than
        Wallachian sheep.

        H
        All opinions my own

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        ... In principle, both, but in practice, the Wallachian sheep were traditional. The birkas were the newer Merino sheep. Martin
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 31, 2010
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          > Which kind of sheep was kept for bryndza?

          In principle, both, but in practice, the Wallachian sheep were traditional. The "birkas" were the newer Merino sheep.


          Martin
        • Margo Smith
          Thanks, Martin.  You can tell I m a city slicker -- I couldn t tell which was which when I saw them in the field.  Actually, the big surprise for me was that
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 1 6:20 PM
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            Thanks, Martin.  You can tell I'm a city slicker -- I couldn't tell which was
            which when I saw them in the field.  Actually, the big surprise for me was that
            I didn't see very many sheep at all (in Zliechov, even though they make and sell
            bryndza there).

            Margo




            ________________________________
            From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, July 31, 2010 10:12:06 PM
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Traditional agriculture--48

             
            > Which kind of sheep was kept for bryndza?

            In principle, both, but in practice, the Wallachian sheep were traditional. The
            "birkas" were the newer Merino sheep.

            Martin







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • votrubam
            ... Hardly any Slovaks can, either, Margo. ... Although bryndza and sheep are part of Slovakia s modern mythology, neither is an important part of the
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 2 5:53 AM
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              > I couldn't tell which was which when I saw them in the field.

              Hardly any Slovaks can, either, Margo.


              > I didn't see very many sheep at all (in Zliechov, even
              > though they make and sell bryndza there).

              Although bryndza and sheep are part of Slovakia's "modern mythology," neither is an important part of the Slovaks' real lives. Slovakia has substantially fewer sheep relative to its population not just by comparison to traditional sheep-rearing countries like Greece, Italy, and Hungary, but also, for instance, almost 90 percent less than Sweden.

              Free-market Slovakia had about 450,000 sheep before WW II, the Communists boosted it up to 700,000, but the number has gone down to under 350,000 since the return of democracy. On average, the Slovaks eat merely 10-15 ounces of bryndza per year.


              Martin
            • John Polko
              Hello All:   When I went to Slovakia in 1992, I was treated to some Brindza, by relatives.  They very proudly announced that it was from the mountains, and
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 2 1:22 PM
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                Hello All:
                 
                When I went to Slovakia in 1992, I was treated to some Brindza, by relatives.  They very proudly announced that it was from the mountains, and that the producer was particularly good at making the cheese.
                 
                Best wishes,
                 
                John e. Polko.

                --- On Mon, 8/2/10, votrubam <votrubam@...> wrote:


                From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Traditional agriculture--48
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, August 2, 2010, 12:53 PM


                 



                > I couldn't tell which was which when I saw them in the field.

                Hardly any Slovaks can, either, Margo.

                > I didn't see very many sheep at all (in Zliechov, even
                > though they make and sell bryndza there).

                Although bryndza and sheep are part of Slovakia's "modern mythology," neither is an important part of the Slovaks' real lives. Slovakia has substantially fewer sheep relative to its population not just by comparison to traditional sheep-rearing countries like Greece, Italy, and Hungary, but also, for instance, almost 90 percent less than Sweden.

                Free-market Slovakia had about 450,000 sheep before WW II, the Communists boosted it up to 700,000, but the number has gone down to under 350,000 since the return of democracy. On average, the Slovaks eat merely 10-15 ounces of bryndza per year.

                Martin








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