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Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

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  • Lubos Brieda
    I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about Slovak grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it. ________________________________ Comment:
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 18 7:42 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about Slovak
      grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

      ________________________________

      Comment:
      Here is my story about my grandmother.
      That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about five
      or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college years) I
      used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to avoid my
      parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you come
      in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
      Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to here
      place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
      sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents. But
      the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix of
      smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a Sunday
      lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
      largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
      Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
      Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best lunch
      in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays, Tuesdays and
      sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays whatever. So,
      on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch soon
      after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm clock
      from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from kitchen too
      which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in Slovakia. I
      woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
      listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to until
      today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while waiting
      for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven working
      all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around the
      kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was unforgetable. And
      no wonder why. She u!
      sed to m
      ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product unless
      absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh vegetables from
      our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a tomato.
      If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick yolk...
      Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle making
      five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all within
      three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in Bratislava
      started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
      pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of Borovička
      (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
      (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I could
      not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night before. In
      those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken but
      hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So, Sundays
      lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If beef
      soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a bones to
      put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools. Regardless
      of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of vegetables in
      it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three garlics,
      celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy cabbage
      (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť), parsley
      (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables from
      soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I loved it.
      Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with noodles,
      second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef or
      marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
      ed fried
      pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak (viedenský
      rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
      rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another days
      it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately baked in
      a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast pork
      (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage (dusená
      kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
      (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of fresh or
      canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový šalát)
      (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový šalat)
      or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans, mushrooms,
      etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or canned
      fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind of a
      sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy Seed and
      Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka, mrezovnik),
      plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľový koláč,
      atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and often
      my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling asleep.
      After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a bottle
      of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker, atd.).
      Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the same,
      I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
      years.
      And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her sometimes
      experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially looking
      for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a year.
      And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are much
      more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she has as
      well.
      Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak grandmamas
      are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to. I am
      sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking for
      us, they would choose to make us happy.




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      Dzkuju Kubos~ Taky dobry spomienky. My grandmother an Ma cooked the same way. My father was not Lovak but we all were, (Thanks ti God and Ma). We were poor
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 18 10:03 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Dzkuju Kubos~ Taky dobry spomienky.
        My grandmother an Ma cooked the same way. My father was not Lovak but we all
        were, (Thanks ti God and Ma). We were poor but what we didn't have during the
        war because of food rationing my Gram and Gramp supplied from the farm. I was 8
        or 9 when I was taught how to butcher and clean chickens ducks and geese and
        rabbits. That included bleeding out the ducks and geese for my mother to fry.

        Z Bohom,

        Vilko





        ________________________________
        From: Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...>
        To: slovak-world@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, July 18, 2010 10:42:44 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"


        I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about Slovak
        grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

        ________________________________

        Comment:
        Here is my story about my grandmother.
        That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about five
        or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college years) I
        used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to avoid my

        parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you come
        in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
        Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to here
        place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
        sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents. But
        the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix of
        smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a Sunday

        lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
        largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
        Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
        Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best lunch

        in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays, Tuesdays and

        sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays whatever. So,
        on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch soon
        after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm clock
        from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from kitchen too

        which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in Slovakia. I

        woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
        listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to until
        today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while waiting
        for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven working
        all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around the
        kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was unforgetable. And

        no wonder why. She u!
        sed to m
        ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product unless
        absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh vegetables from
        our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a tomato.
        If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick yolk...
        Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle making
        five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all within
        three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in Bratislava
        started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
        pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of Borovička

        (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
        (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I could
        not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night before. In
        those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken but
        hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So, Sundays
        lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If beef
        soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a bones to
        put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools. Regardless
        of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of vegetables in
        it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three garlics,
        celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy cabbage

        (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť), parsley
        (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables from
        soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I loved it.

        Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with noodles,
        second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef or
        marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
        ed fried
        pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak (viedenský
        rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
        rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another days
        it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately baked in

        a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast pork
        (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage (dusená
        kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
        (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of fresh or

        canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový šalát)
        (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový šalat)

        or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans, mushrooms,

        etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or canned
        fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind of a
        sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy Seed and

        Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka, mrezovnik),
        plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľový koláč,
        atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and often
        my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling asleep.
        After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a bottle

        of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker, atd.).
        Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the same,

        I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
        years.
        And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her sometimes
        experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially looking

        for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a year.
        And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are much
        more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she has as
        well.
        Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak grandmamas
        are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to. I am
        sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking for
        us, they would choose to make us happy.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Wyatt505@aol.com
        while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba s Sunday chicken
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 19 7:50 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
          but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
          soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
          root...! Jim Stroke (Straka) _jimstroke@..._ (mailto:jimstroke@...)





          In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
          lbrieda@... writes:




          I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
          Slovak
          grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

          ________________________________

          Comment:
          Here is my story about my grandmother.
          That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
          five
          or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
          years) I
          used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
          avoid my
          parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
          come
          in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
          Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
          here
          place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
          sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
          But
          the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
          of
          smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
          Sunday
          lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
          largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
          Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
          Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
          lunch
          in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
          Tuesdays and
          sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
          whatever. So,
          on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
          soon
          after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
          clock
          from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
          kitchen too
          which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
          Slovakia. I
          woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
          listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
          until
          today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
          waiting
          for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
          working
          all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
          the
          kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
          unforgetable. And
          no wonder why. She u!
          sed to m
          ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
          unless
          absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
          vegetables from
          our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
          tomato.
          If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
          yolk...
          Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
          making
          five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
          within
          three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
          Bratislava
          started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
          pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
          Borovička
          (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
          (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
          could
          not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
          before. In
          those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
          but
          hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
          Sundays
          lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
          beef
          soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
          bones to
          put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
          Regardless
          of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
          vegetables in
          it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
          garlics,
          celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
          cabbage
          (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
          parsley
          (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
          from
          soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
          loved it.
          Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
          noodles,
          second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
          or
          marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
          ed fried
          pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
          (viedenský
          rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
          rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
          days
          it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
          baked in
          a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
          pork
          (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
          (dusená
          kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
          (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
          fresh or
          canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
          alát)
          (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
          šalat)
          or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
          mushrooms,
          etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
          canned
          fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
          of a
          sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
          Seed and
          Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
          mrezovnik),
          plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
          ový koláč,
          atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
          often
          my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
          asleep.
          After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
          bottle
          of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
          atd.).
          Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
          same,
          I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
          years.
          And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
          sometimes
          experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
          looking
          for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
          year.
          And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
          much
          more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
          has as
          well.
          Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
          grandmamas
          are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
          I am
          sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
          for
          us, they would choose to make us happy.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Fedor, Helen
          For us, was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so that it wouldn t damage the table. The rolling board we called a . Lubos, what
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 20 5:25 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so that it wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos, what is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern dialects, they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

            H
            All opinions and ignorance my own

            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wyatt505@...
            Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



            while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
            but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
            soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
            root...! Jim Stroke (Straka) _jimstroke@...<mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_ (mailto:jimstroke@...<mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)





            In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
            lbrieda@...<mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com> writes:

            I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
            Slovak
            grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

            ________________________________

            Comment:
            Here is my story about my grandmother.
            That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
            five
            or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
            years) I
            used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
            avoid my
            parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
            come
            in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
            Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
            here
            place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
            sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
            But
            the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
            of
            smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
            Sunday
            lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
            largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
            Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
            Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
            lunch
            in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
            Tuesdays and
            sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
            whatever. So,
            on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
            soon
            after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
            clock
            from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
            kitchen too
            which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
            Slovakia. I
            woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
            listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
            until
            today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
            waiting
            for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
            working
            all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
            the
            kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
            unforgetable. And
            no wonder why. She u!
            sed to m
            ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
            unless
            absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
            vegetables from
            our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
            tomato.
            If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
            yolk...
            Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
            making
            five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
            within
            three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
            Bratislava
            started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
            pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
            Borovička
            (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
            (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
            could
            not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
            before. In
            those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
            but
            hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
            Sundays
            lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
            beef
            soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
            bones to
            put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
            Regardless
            of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
            vegetables in
            it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
            garlics,
            celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
            cabbage
            (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
            parsley
            (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
            from
            soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
            loved it.
            Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
            noodles,
            second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
            or
            marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
            ed fried
            pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
            (viedenský
            rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
            rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
            days
            it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
            baked in
            a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
            pork
            (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
            (dusená
            kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
            (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
            fresh or
            canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
            alát)
            (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
            šalat)
            or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
            mushrooms,
            etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
            canned
            fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
            of a
            sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
            Seed and
            Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
            mrezovnik),
            plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
            ový koláč,
            atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
            often
            my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
            asleep.
            After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
            bottle
            of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
            atd.).
            Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
            same,
            I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
            years.
            And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
            sometimes
            experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
            looking
            for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
            year.
            And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
            much
            more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
            has as
            well.
            Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
            grandmamas
            are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
            I am
            sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
            for
            us, they would choose to make us happy.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Lubos Brieda
            I haven t heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part of the standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect is
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 20 6:34 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part of the
              standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect is
              almost like a completely different language.

              Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's gotta
              be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
              board.

              And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and Slovak!
              I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
              -- Lubos Brieda --
              Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
              hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com





              ________________________________
              From: "Fedor, Helen" <hfed@...>
              To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
              Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

              For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so that it
              wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos, what
              is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern dialects,
              they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
              dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

              H
              All opinions and ignorance my own

              From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Wyatt505@...
              Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



              while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
              but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
              soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
              root...! Jim Stroke (Straka) _jimstroke@...<mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
              (mailto:jimstroke@...<mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)





              In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
              lbrieda@...<mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com> writes:

              I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
              Slovak
              grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

              ________________________________

              Comment:
              Here is my story about my grandmother.
              That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
              five
              or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
              years) I
              used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
              avoid my
              parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
              come
              in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
              Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
              here
              place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
              sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
              But
              the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
              of
              smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
              Sunday
              lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
              largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
              Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
              Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
              lunch
              in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
              Tuesdays and
              sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
              whatever. So,
              on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
              soon
              after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
              clock
              from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
              kitchen too
              which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
              Slovakia. I
              woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
              listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
              until
              today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
              waiting
              for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
              working
              all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
              the
              kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
              unforgetable. And
              no wonder why. She u!
              sed to m
              ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
              unless
              absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
              vegetables from
              our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
              tomato.
              If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
              yolk...
              Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
              making
              five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
              within
              three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
              Bratislava
              started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
              pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
              Borovička
              (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
              (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
              could
              not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
              before. In
              those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
              but
              hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
              Sundays
              lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
              beef
              soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
              bones to
              put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
              Regardless
              of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
              vegetables in
              it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
              garlics,
              celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
              cabbage
              (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
              parsley
              (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
              from
              soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
              loved it.
              Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
              noodles,
              second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
              or
              marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
              ed fried
              pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
              (viedenský
              rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
              rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
              days
              it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
              baked in
              a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
              pork
              (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
              (dusená
              kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
              (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
              fresh or
              canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
              alát)
              (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
              šalat)
              or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
              mushrooms,
              etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
              canned
              fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
              of a
              sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
              Seed and
              Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
              mrezovnik),
              plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
              ový koláč,
              atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
              often
              my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
              asleep.
              After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
              bottle
              of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
              atd.).
              Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
              same,
              I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
              years.
              And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
              sometimes
              experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
              looking
              for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
              year.
              And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
              much
              more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
              has as
              well.
              Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
              grandmamas
              are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
              I am
              sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
              for
              us, they would choose to make us happy.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Fedor, Helen
              A trivet (or hotpad ) is usually made of cork or wood , or even metal
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 20 7:03 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood < http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg >, or even metal < http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting people help themselves.

                In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as <dy'nko>, a piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or the piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut in a barrel.

                H
                All opinions my own

                From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
                Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



                I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part of the
                standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect is
                almost like a completely different language.

                Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's gotta
                be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
                board.

                And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and Slovak!
                I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
                -- Lubos Brieda --
                Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                ________________________________
                From: "Fedor, Helen" <hfed@...<mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>
                To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>
                Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
                Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so that it
                wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos, what
                is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern dialects,
                they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
                dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

                H
                All opinions and ignorance my own

                From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                Behalf Of Wyatt505@...<mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>
                Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
                but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
                soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
                root...! Jim Stroke (Straka) _jimstroke@...<mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
                (mailto:jimstroke@...<mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)

                In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                lbrieda@...<mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com> writes:

                I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
                Slovak
                grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

                ________________________________

                Comment:
                Here is my story about my grandmother.
                That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
                five
                or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
                years) I
                used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
                avoid my
                parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
                come
                in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
                Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
                here
                place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
                sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
                But
                the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
                of
                smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
                Sunday
                lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
                largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
                Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
                Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
                lunch
                in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
                Tuesdays and
                sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
                whatever. So,
                on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
                soon
                after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
                clock
                from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
                kitchen too
                which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
                Slovakia. I
                woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
                listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
                until
                today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
                waiting
                for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
                working
                all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
                the
                kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
                unforgetable. And
                no wonder why. She u!
                sed to m
                ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
                unless
                absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
                vegetables from
                our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
                tomato.
                If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
                yolk...
                Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
                making
                five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
                within
                three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
                Bratislava
                started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
                pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
                Borovička
                (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
                (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
                could
                not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
                before. In
                those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
                but
                hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
                Sundays
                lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
                beef
                soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
                bones to
                put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
                Regardless
                of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
                vegetables in
                it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
                garlics,
                celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
                cabbage
                (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
                parsley
                (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
                from
                soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
                loved it.
                Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
                noodles,
                second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
                or
                marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
                ed fried
                pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
                (viedenský
                rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
                rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
                days
                it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
                baked in
                a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
                pork
                (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
                (dusená
                kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
                (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
                fresh or
                canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
                alát)
                (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
                šalat)
                or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
                mushrooms,
                etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
                canned
                fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
                of a
                sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
                Seed and
                Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
                mrezovnik),
                plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
                ový koláč,
                atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
                often
                my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
                asleep.
                After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
                bottle
                of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
                atd.).
                Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
                same,
                I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
                years.
                And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
                sometimes
                experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
                looking
                for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
                year.
                And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
                much
                more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
                has as
                well.
                Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
                grandmamas
                are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
                I am
                sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
                for
                us, they would choose to make us happy.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                ------------------------------------

                Yahoo! Groups Links

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lubos Brieda
                Funny, so I figured I ll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And there is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it podložka pod
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 20 7:14 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And there
                  is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it "podložka pod
                  hrniec", trivet for under a pot.
                  http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html

                  -- Lubos Brieda --
                  Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                  hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com





                  ________________________________
                  From: "Fedor, Helen" <hfed@...>
                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 10:03:33 AM
                  Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                  A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood <
                  http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg >, or even metal <
                  http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg
                  >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled
                  plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting people
                  help themselves.

                  In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as <dy'nko>, a
                  piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or the
                  piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut in a
                  barrel.

                  H
                  All opinions my own

                  From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
                  Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
                  Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



                  I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part of the
                  standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect is
                  almost like a completely different language.

                  Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's gotta
                  be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
                  board.

                  And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and Slovak!
                  I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
                  -- Lubos Brieda --
                  Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                  hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                  ________________________________
                  From: "Fedor, Helen" <hfed@...<mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>
                  To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>"
                  <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>
                  Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
                  Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                  For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so that it
                  wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos, what
                  is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern dialects,
                  they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
                  dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

                  H
                  All opinions and ignorance my own

                  From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                  [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                  Behalf Of Wyatt505@...<mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>
                  Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                  while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
                  but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
                  soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
                  root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)
                  _jimstroke@...<mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
                  (mailto:jimstroke@...<mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)


                  In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                  lbrieda@...<mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com>
                  writes:

                  I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
                  Slovak
                  grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

                  ________________________________

                  Comment:
                  Here is my story about my grandmother.
                  That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
                  five
                  or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
                  years) I
                  used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
                  avoid my
                  parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
                  come
                  in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
                  Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
                  here
                  place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
                  sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
                  But
                  the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
                  of
                  smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
                  Sunday
                  lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
                  largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
                  Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
                  Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
                  lunch
                  in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
                  Tuesdays and
                  sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
                  whatever. So,
                  on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
                  soon
                  after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
                  clock
                  from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
                  kitchen too
                  which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
                  Slovakia. I
                  woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
                  listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
                  until
                  today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
                  waiting
                  for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
                  working
                  all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
                  the
                  kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
                  unforgetable. And
                  no wonder why. She u!
                  sed to m
                  ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
                  unless
                  absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
                  vegetables from
                  our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
                  tomato.
                  If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
                  yolk...
                  Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
                  making
                  five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
                  within
                  three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
                  Bratislava
                  started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
                  pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
                  Borovička
                  (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
                  (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
                  could
                  not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
                  before. In
                  those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
                  but
                  hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
                  Sundays
                  lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
                  beef
                  soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
                  bones to
                  put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
                  Regardless
                  of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
                  vegetables in
                  it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
                  garlics,
                  celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
                  cabbage
                  (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
                  parsley
                  (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
                  from
                  soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
                  loved it.
                  Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
                  noodles,
                  second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
                  or
                  marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
                  ed fried
                  pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
                  (viedenský
                  rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
                  rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
                  days
                  it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
                  baked in
                  a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
                  pork
                  (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
                  (dusená
                  kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
                  (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
                  fresh or
                  canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
                  alát)
                  (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
                  šalat)
                  or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
                  mushrooms,
                  etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
                  canned
                  fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
                  of a
                  sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
                  Seed and
                  Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
                  mrezovnik),
                  plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
                  ový koláč,
                  atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
                  often
                  my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
                  asleep.
                  After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
                  bottle
                  of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
                  atd.).
                  Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
                  same,
                  I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
                  years.
                  And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
                  sometimes
                  experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
                  looking
                  for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
                  year.
                  And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
                  much
                  more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
                  has as
                  well.
                  Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
                  grandmamas
                  are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
                  I am
                  sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
                  for
                  us, they would choose to make us happy.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • slovak821@aol.com
                  We did not use a Slovak word for a trivet, but I still refer to my pastry board as a tabla . Even my non-Slovak husband calls it a tabla. Jacqueline In a
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 20 7:40 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    We did not use a Slovak word for a trivet, but I still refer to my pastry
                    board as a "tabla". Even my non-Slovak husband calls it a tabla.
                    Jacqueline


                    In a message dated 7/20/2010 8:25:30 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                    hfed@... writes:

                    For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so
                    that it wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>.
                    Lubos, what is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of
                    eastern dialects, they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find
                    it in another dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?



                    H

                    All opinions and ignorance my own



                    From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]
                    On Behalf Of Wyatt505@...

                    Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM

                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com

                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"







                    while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay

                    but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken

                    soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley

                    root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)
                    _jimstroke@...<mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_ (mailto:jimstroke@...<mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)











                    In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,

                    lbrieda@...<mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com> writes:



                    I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about

                    Slovak

                    grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.



                    ________________________________



                    Comment:

                    Here is my story about my grandmother.

                    That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about

                    five

                    or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college

                    years) I

                    used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to

                    avoid my

                    parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you

                    come

                    in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in

                    Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to

                    here

                    place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she

                    sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.

                    But

                    the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix

                    of

                    smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a

                    Sunday

                    lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and

                    largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,

                    Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with

                    Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best

                    lunch

                    in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,

                    Tuesdays and

                    sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays

                    whatever. So,

                    on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch

                    soon

                    after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm

                    clock

                    from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from

                    kitchen too

                    which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in

                    Slovakia. I

                    woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and

                    listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to

                    until

                    today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while

                    waiting

                    for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven

                    working

                    all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around

                    the

                    kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was

                    unforgetable. And

                    no wonder why. She u!

                    sed to m

                    ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product

                    unless

                    absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh

                    vegetables from

                    our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a

                    tomato.

                    If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick

                    yolk...

                    Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle

                    making

                    five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all

                    within

                    three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in

                    Bratislava

                    started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and

                    pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of

                    Borovička

                    (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica

                    (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I

                    could

                    not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night

                    before. In

                    those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken

                    but

                    hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,

                    Sundays

                    lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If

                    beef

                    soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a

                    bones to

                    put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.

                    Regardless

                    of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of

                    vegetables in

                    it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three

                    garlics,

                    celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy

                    cabbage

                    (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),

                    parsley

                    (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables

                    from

                    soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I

                    loved it.

                    Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with

                    noodles,

                    second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef

                    or

                    marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!

                    ed fried

                    pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak

                    (viedenský

                    rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci

                    rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another

                    days

                    it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately

                    baked in

                    a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast

                    pork

                    (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage

                    (dusená

                    kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream

                    (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of

                    fresh or

                    canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š

                    alát)

                    (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový

                    šalat)

                    or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,

                    mushrooms,

                    etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or

                    canned

                    fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind

                    of a

                    sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy

                    Seed and

                    Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,

                    mrezovnik),

                    plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ

                    ový koláč,

                    atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and

                    often

                    my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling

                    asleep.

                    After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a

                    bottle

                    of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,

                    atd.).

                    Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the

                    same,

                    I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven

                    years.

                    And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her

                    sometimes

                    experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially

                    looking

                    for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a

                    year.

                    And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are

                    much

                    more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she

                    has as

                    well.

                    Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak

                    grandmamas

                    are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.

                    I am

                    sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking

                    for

                    us, they would choose to make us happy.



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • hmsbob@aol.com
                    In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, lbrieda@yahoo.com writes: Funny, so I figured I ll go on slovak google and see what I can
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jul 21 4:40 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                      lbrieda@... writes:




                      Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And
                      there
                      is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it "podložka
                      pod
                      hrniec", trivet for under a pot.
                      _http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozk
                      a-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html_
                      (http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html)

                      -- Lubos Brieda --
                      Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                      hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                      ________________________________
                      From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...) >
                      To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) "
                      <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) >
                      Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 10:03:33 AM
                      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                      A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood <
                      _http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg_
                      (http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg) >, or even metal <
                      _http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-l
                      arge.jpg_
                      (http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg)
                      >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled

                      plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting
                      people
                      help themselves.

                      In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as
                      <dy'nko>, a
                      piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or
                      the
                      piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut
                      in a
                      barrel.

                      H
                      All opinions my own

                      From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                      [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                      (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) ] On
                      Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
                      Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM
                      To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                      I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part
                      of the
                      standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect
                      is
                      almost like a completely different language.

                      Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's
                      gotta
                      be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
                      board.

                      And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and
                      Slovak!
                      I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
                      -- Lubos Brieda --
                      Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                      hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                      ________________________________
                      From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...)
                      <mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>
                      To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                      <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>"
                      <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                      <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>
                      Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
                      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                      For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so
                      that it
                      wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos,
                      what
                      is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern
                      dialects,
                      they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
                      dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

                      H
                      All opinions and ignorance my own

                      From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                      <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                      [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                      (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                      Behalf Of _Wyatt505@..._ (mailto:Wyatt505@...)
                      <mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>
                      Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
                      To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                      <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                      while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
                      but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
                      soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
                      root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)
                      __jimstroke@..._ (mailto:_jimstroke@...)
                      <mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
                      (mailto:_jimstroke@..._ (mailto:jimstroke@...)
                      <mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)

                      In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      _lbrieda@..._ (mailto:lbrieda@...)
                      <mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com>
                      writes:

                      I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
                      Slovak
                      grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

                      ________________________________

                      Comment:
                      Here is my story about my grandmother.
                      That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
                      five
                      or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
                      years) I
                      used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
                      avoid my
                      parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
                      come
                      in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
                      Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
                      here
                      place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
                      sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
                      But
                      the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
                      of
                      smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
                      Sunday
                      lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
                      largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
                      Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
                      Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
                      lunch
                      in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
                      Tuesdays and
                      sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
                      whatever. So,
                      on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
                      soon
                      after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
                      clock
                      from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
                      kitchen too
                      which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
                      Slovakia. I
                      woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
                      listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
                      until
                      today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
                      waiting
                      for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
                      working
                      all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
                      the
                      kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
                      unforgetable. And
                      no wonder why. She u!
                      sed to m
                      ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
                      unless
                      absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
                      vegetables from
                      our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
                      tomato.
                      If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
                      yolk...
                      Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
                      making
                      five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
                      within
                      three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
                      Bratislava
                      started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
                      pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
                      Borovička
                      (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
                      (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
                      could
                      not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
                      before. In
                      those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
                      but
                      hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
                      Sundays
                      lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
                      beef
                      soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
                      bones to
                      put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
                      Regardless
                      of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
                      vegetables in
                      it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
                      garlics,
                      celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
                      cabbage
                      (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
                      parsley
                      (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
                      from
                      soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
                      loved it.
                      Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
                      noodles,
                      second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
                      or
                      marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
                      ed fried
                      pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
                      (viedenský
                      rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
                      rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
                      days
                      it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
                      baked in
                      a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
                      pork
                      (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
                      (dusená
                      kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
                      (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
                      fresh or
                      canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
                      alát)
                      (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
                      šalat)
                      or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
                      mushrooms,
                      etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
                      canned
                      fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
                      of a
                      sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
                      Seed and
                      Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
                      mrezovnik),
                      plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
                      ový koláč,
                      atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
                      often
                      my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
                      asleep.
                      After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
                      bottle
                      of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
                      atd.).
                      Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
                      same,
                      I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
                      years.
                      And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
                      sometimes
                      experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
                      looking
                      for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
                      year.
                      And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
                      much
                      more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
                      has as
                      well.
                      Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
                      grandmamas
                      are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
                      I am
                      sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
                      for
                      us, they would choose to make us happy.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • hmsbob@aol.com
                      In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, lbrieda@yahoo.com writes: Funny, so I figured I ll go on slovak google and see what I can
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jul 21 4:41 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                        lbrieda@... writes:




                        Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And
                        there
                        is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it "podložka
                        pod
                        hrniec", trivet for under a pot.
                        _http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozk
                        a-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html_
                        (http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html)

                        -- Lubos Brieda --
                        Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                        hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                        ________________________________
                        From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...) >
                        To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) "
                        <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) >
                        Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 10:03:33 AM
                        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                        A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood <
                        _http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg_
                        (http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg) >, or even metal <
                        _http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-l
                        arge.jpg_
                        (http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg)
                        >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled

                        plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting
                        people
                        help themselves.

                        In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as
                        <dy'nko>, a
                        piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or
                        the
                        piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut
                        in a
                        barrel.

                        H
                        All opinions my own

                        From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                        [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                        (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) ] On
                        Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM
                        To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                        I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part
                        of the
                        standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect
                        is
                        almost like a completely different language.

                        Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's
                        gotta
                        be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
                        board.

                        And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and
                        Slovak!
                        I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
                        -- Lubos Brieda --
                        Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                        hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                        ________________________________
                        From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...)
                        <mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>
                        To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>"
                        <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>
                        Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
                        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                        For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so
                        that it
                        wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos,
                        what
                        is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern
                        dialects,
                        they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
                        dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

                        H
                        All opinions and ignorance my own

                        From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                        [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                        (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                        Behalf Of _Wyatt505@..._ (mailto:Wyatt505@...)
                        <mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>
                        Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
                        To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                        while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
                        but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
                        soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
                        root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)
                        __jimstroke@..._ (mailto:_jimstroke@...)
                        <mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
                        (mailto:_jimstroke@..._ (mailto:jimstroke@...)
                        <mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)

                        In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                        _lbrieda@..._ (mailto:lbrieda@...)
                        <mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com>
                        writes:

                        I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
                        Slovak
                        grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

                        ________________________________

                        Comment:
                        Here is my story about my grandmother.
                        That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
                        five
                        or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
                        years) I
                        used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
                        avoid my
                        parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
                        come
                        in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
                        Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
                        here
                        place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
                        sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
                        But
                        the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
                        of
                        smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
                        Sunday
                        lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
                        largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
                        Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
                        Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
                        lunch
                        in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
                        Tuesdays and
                        sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
                        whatever. So,
                        on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
                        soon
                        after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
                        clock
                        from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
                        kitchen too
                        which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
                        Slovakia. I
                        woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
                        listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
                        until
                        today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
                        waiting
                        for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
                        working
                        all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
                        the
                        kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
                        unforgetable. And
                        no wonder why. She u!
                        sed to m
                        ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
                        unless
                        absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
                        vegetables from
                        our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
                        tomato.
                        If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
                        yolk...
                        Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
                        making
                        five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
                        within
                        three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
                        Bratislava
                        started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
                        pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
                        Borovička
                        (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
                        (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
                        could
                        not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
                        before. In
                        those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
                        but
                        hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
                        Sundays
                        lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
                        beef
                        soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
                        bones to
                        put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
                        Regardless
                        of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
                        vegetables in
                        it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
                        garlics,
                        celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
                        cabbage
                        (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
                        parsley
                        (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
                        from
                        soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
                        loved it.
                        Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
                        noodles,
                        second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
                        or
                        marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
                        ed fried
                        pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
                        (viedenský
                        rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
                        rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
                        days
                        it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
                        baked in
                        a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
                        pork
                        (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
                        (dusená
                        kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
                        (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
                        fresh or
                        canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
                        alát)
                        (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
                        šalat)
                        or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
                        mushrooms,
                        etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
                        canned
                        fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
                        of a
                        sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
                        Seed and
                        Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
                        mrezovnik),
                        plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
                        ový koláč,
                        atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
                        often
                        my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
                        asleep.
                        After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
                        bottle
                        of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
                        atd.).
                        Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
                        same,
                        I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
                        years.
                        And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
                        sometimes
                        experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
                        looking
                        for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
                        year.
                        And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
                        much
                        more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
                        has as
                        well.
                        Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
                        grandmamas
                        are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
                        I am
                        sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
                        for
                        us, they would choose to make us happy.

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ------------------------------------

                        Yahoo! Groups Links

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ------------------------------------

                        Yahoo! Groups Links

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • hmsbob@aol.com
                        In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, lbrieda@yahoo.com writes: Funny, so I figured I ll go on slovak google and see what I can
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jul 21 4:41 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                          lbrieda@... writes:




                          Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And
                          there
                          is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it "podložka
                          pod
                          hrniec", trivet for under a pot.
                          _http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozk
                          a-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html_
                          (http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html)

                          -- Lubos Brieda --
                          Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                          hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                          ________________________________
                          From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...) >
                          To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) "
                          <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) >
                          Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 10:03:33 AM
                          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                          A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood <
                          _http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg_
                          (http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg) >, or even metal <
                          _http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-l
                          arge.jpg_
                          (http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg)
                          >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled

                          plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting
                          people
                          help themselves.

                          In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as
                          <dy'nko>, a
                          piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or
                          the
                          piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut
                          in a
                          barrel.

                          H
                          All opinions my own

                          From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                          [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                          (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) ] On
                          Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
                          Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM
                          To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                          I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part
                          of the
                          standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect
                          is
                          almost like a completely different language.

                          Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's
                          gotta
                          be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
                          board.

                          And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and
                          Slovak!
                          I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
                          -- Lubos Brieda --
                          Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                          hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                          ________________________________
                          From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...)
                          <mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>
                          To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                          <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>"
                          <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                          <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>
                          Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
                          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                          For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so
                          that it
                          wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos,
                          what
                          is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern
                          dialects,
                          they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
                          dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

                          H
                          All opinions and ignorance my own

                          From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                          <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                          [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                          (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                          Behalf Of _Wyatt505@..._ (mailto:Wyatt505@...)
                          <mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>
                          Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
                          To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                          <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                          while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
                          but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
                          soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
                          root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)
                          __jimstroke@..._ (mailto:_jimstroke@...)
                          <mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
                          (mailto:_jimstroke@..._ (mailto:jimstroke@...)
                          <mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)

                          In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                          _lbrieda@..._ (mailto:lbrieda@...)
                          <mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com>
                          writes:

                          I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
                          Slovak
                          grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

                          ________________________________

                          Comment:
                          Here is my story about my grandmother.
                          That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
                          five
                          or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
                          years) I
                          used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
                          avoid my
                          parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
                          come
                          in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
                          Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
                          here
                          place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
                          sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
                          But
                          the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
                          of
                          smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
                          Sunday
                          lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
                          largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
                          Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
                          Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
                          lunch
                          in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
                          Tuesdays and
                          sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
                          whatever. So,
                          on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
                          soon
                          after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
                          clock
                          from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
                          kitchen too
                          which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
                          Slovakia. I
                          woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
                          listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
                          until
                          today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
                          waiting
                          for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
                          working
                          all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
                          the
                          kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
                          unforgetable. And
                          no wonder why. She u!
                          sed to m
                          ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
                          unless
                          absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
                          vegetables from
                          our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
                          tomato.
                          If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
                          yolk...
                          Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
                          making
                          five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
                          within
                          three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
                          Bratislava
                          started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
                          pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
                          Borovička
                          (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
                          (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
                          could
                          not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
                          before. In
                          those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
                          but
                          hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
                          Sundays
                          lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
                          beef
                          soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
                          bones to
                          put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
                          Regardless
                          of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
                          vegetables in
                          it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
                          garlics,
                          celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
                          cabbage
                          (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
                          parsley
                          (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
                          from
                          soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
                          loved it.
                          Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
                          noodles,
                          second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
                          or
                          marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
                          ed fried
                          pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
                          (viedenský
                          rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
                          rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
                          days
                          it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
                          baked in
                          a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
                          pork
                          (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
                          (dusená
                          kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
                          (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
                          fresh or
                          canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
                          alát)
                          (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
                          šalat)
                          or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
                          mushrooms,
                          etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
                          canned
                          fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
                          of a
                          sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
                          Seed and
                          Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
                          mrezovnik),
                          plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
                          ový koláč,
                          atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
                          often
                          my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
                          asleep.
                          After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
                          bottle
                          of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
                          atd.).
                          Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
                          same,
                          I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
                          years.
                          And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
                          sometimes
                          experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
                          looking
                          for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
                          year.
                          And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
                          much
                          more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
                          has as
                          well.
                          Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
                          grandmamas
                          are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
                          I am
                          sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
                          for
                          us, they would choose to make us happy.

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          ------------------------------------

                          Yahoo! Groups Links

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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • hmsbob@aol.com
                          too bad they don t have a button that converts the pages to english so us non understanding of slovak can read what is on the sight In a message dated
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jul 21 4:42 PM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            too bad they don't have a button that converts the pages to english so us
                            non understanding of slovak can read what is on the sight


                            In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                            lbrieda@... writes:




                            Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And
                            there
                            is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it "podložka
                            pod
                            hrniec", trivet for under a pot.
                            _http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozk
                            a-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html_
                            (http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html)

                            -- Lubos Brieda --
                            Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                            hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                            ________________________________
                            From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...) >
                            To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) "
                            <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) >
                            Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 10:03:33 AM
                            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                            A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood <
                            _http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg_
                            (http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg) >, or even metal <
                            _http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-l
                            arge.jpg_ (http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009
                            /12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg)
                            >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled

                            plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting
                            people
                            help themselves.

                            In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as
                            <dy'nko>, a
                            piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or
                            the
                            piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut
                            in a
                            barrel.

                            H
                            All opinions my own

                            From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                            [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                            (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) ] On
                            Behalf Of Lubos Brieda
                            Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM
                            To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                            I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part
                            of the
                            standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect
                            is
                            almost like a completely different language.

                            Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's
                            gotta
                            be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden
                            board.

                            And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and
                            Slovak!
                            I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...
                            -- Lubos Brieda --
                            Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
                            hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com

                            ________________________________
                            From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...)
                            <mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>
                            To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                            <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>"
                            <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                            <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>
                            Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM
                            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                            For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so
                            that it
                            wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos,
                            what
                            is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern
                            dialects,
                            they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another
                            dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?

                            H
                            All opinions and ignorance my own

                            From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                            <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                            [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_
                            (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                            Behalf Of _Wyatt505@..._ (mailto:Wyatt505@...)
                            <mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>
                            Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM
                            To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)
                            <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
                            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"

                            while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay
                            but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken
                            soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley
                            root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)
                            __jimstroke@..._ (mailto:_jimstroke@...)
                            <mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_
                            (mailto:_jimstroke@..._ (mailto:jimstroke@...)
                            <mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)

                            In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                            _lbrieda@..._ (mailto:lbrieda@...)
                            <mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com>
                            writes:

                            I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about
                            Slovak
                            grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.

                            ________________________________

                            Comment:
                            Here is my story about my grandmother.
                            That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about
                            five
                            or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college
                            years) I
                            used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to
                            avoid my
                            parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you
                            come
                            in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in
                            Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to
                            here
                            place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she
                            sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.
                            But
                            the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix
                            of
                            smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a
                            Sunday
                            lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and
                            largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,
                            Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with
                            Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best
                            lunch
                            in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,
                            Tuesdays and
                            sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays
                            whatever. So,
                            on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch
                            soon
                            after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm
                            clock
                            from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from
                            kitchen too
                            which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in
                            Slovakia. I
                            woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and
                            listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to
                            until
                            today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while
                            waiting
                            for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven
                            working
                            all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around
                            the
                            kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was
                            unforgetable. And
                            no wonder why. She u!
                            sed to m
                            ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product
                            unless
                            absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh
                            vegetables from
                            our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a
                            tomato.
                            If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick
                            yolk...
                            Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle
                            making
                            five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all
                            within
                            three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in
                            Bratislava
                            started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and
                            pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of
                            Borovička
                            (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica
                            (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I
                            could
                            not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night
                            before. In
                            those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken
                            but
                            hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,
                            Sundays
                            lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If
                            beef
                            soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a
                            bones to
                            put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.
                            Regardless
                            of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of
                            vegetables in
                            it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three
                            garlics,
                            celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy
                            cabbage
                            (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),
                            parsley
                            (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables
                            from
                            soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I
                            loved it.
                            Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with
                            noodles,
                            second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef
                            or
                            marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!
                            ed fried
                            pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak
                            (viedenský
                            rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci
                            rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another
                            days
                            it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately
                            baked in
                            a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast
                            pork
                            (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage
                            (dusená
                            kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream
                            (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of
                            fresh or
                            canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š
                            alát)
                            (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový
                            šalat)
                            or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,
                            mushrooms,
                            etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or
                            canned
                            fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind
                            of a
                            sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy
                            Seed and
                            Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,
                            mrezovnik),
                            plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ
                            ový koláč,
                            atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and
                            often
                            my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling
                            asleep.
                            After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a
                            bottle
                            of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,
                            atd.).
                            Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the
                            same,
                            I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven
                            years.
                            And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her
                            sometimes
                            experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially
                            looking
                            for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a
                            year.
                            And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are
                            much
                            more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she
                            has as
                            well.
                            Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak
                            grandmamas
                            are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.
                            I am
                            sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking
                            for
                            us, they would choose to make us happy.

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                          • William C. Wormuth
                            You can have a BUTTON TRANSLATOR .  Search for google translator or if you want, Google Toolbar, which includes the translator.. You will have your choice
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jul 21 6:28 PM
                            • 0 Attachment
                              You can have a "BUTTON TRANSLATOR" .  Search for "google translator" or if you want, Google Toolbar, which includes the translator..
                              You will have your choice for add-ons, which may be helpful.
                              Translations are som3etimes "gibberish" but the translator is SUPER for whole pages or phrases.

                              Z Bohom

                              Vilo

                              --- On Wed, 7/21/10, hmsbob@... <hmsbob@...> wrote:

                              From: hmsbob@... <hmsbob@...>
                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, July 21, 2010, 7:42 PM







                               









                              too bad they don't have a button that converts the pages to english so us

                              non understanding of slovak can read what is on the sight





                              In a message dated 7/20/2010 7:25:39 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,

                              lbrieda@... writes:



                              Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can find. And

                              there

                              is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it "podložka

                              pod

                              hrniec", trivet for under a pot.

                              _http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozk

                              a-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html_

                              (http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html)



                              -- Lubos Brieda --

                              Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com

                              hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com



                              ________________________________

                              From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...) >

                              To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) "

                              <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) >

                              Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 10:03:33 AM

                              Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



                              A trivet (or "hotpad") is usually made of cork or wood <

                              _http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg_

                              (http://www.pinwood1999.com/product/housewarebig/15_trivet.jpg) >, or even metal <

                              _http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/hotman-trivet-l

                              arge.jpg_ (http://orangemetallique.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009

                              /12/hotman-trivet-large.jpg)

                              >. I guess they're not so common these days as people tend to bring filled



                              plates to the table instead of putting the pot on the table and letting

                              people

                              help themselves.



                              In the dialect dictionary, the standard word for <denko> is given as

                              <dy'nko>, a

                              piece of wood used as a cover for a clay milk jug; or a cutting board; or

                              the

                              piece of wood placed under the stone used to press down cabbage/sauerkraut

                              in a

                              barrel.



                              H

                              All opinions my own



                              From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)

                              [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_

                              (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) ] On

                              Behalf Of Lubos Brieda

                              Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2010 9:34 AM

                              To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)

                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



                              I haven't heard any of these words before - they are definitely not part

                              of the

                              standard Slovak vocabulary I am familiar with. The eastern Slovak dialect

                              is

                              almost like a completely different language.



                              Rolling board? As in a wooden board on which you roll out dough? There's

                              gotta

                              be some old word for it, but we would just call it "drevená doska", wooden

                              board.



                              And what's a trivet? My vocabulary today is awful - both in English and

                              Slovak!

                              I guess I would call something I place under a hot pot "podložka"...

                              -- Lubos Brieda --

                              Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com

                              hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com



                              ________________________________

                              From: "Fedor, Helen" <_hfed@..._ (mailto:hfed@...)

                              <mailto:hfed%40loc.gov>>

                              To: "_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)

                              <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>"

                              <_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)

                              <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>>

                              Sent: Tue, July 20, 2010 8:25:31 AM

                              Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



                              For us, <denko> was a trivet, which you put under a hot pot or bowl so

                              that it

                              wouldn't damage the table. The rolling board we called a <tabla>. Lubos,

                              what

                              is the standard word for such a board? In the dictionary of eastern

                              dialects,

                              they give <misnik> as the standard term, but I didn't find it in another

                              dictionary. And what's the standard term for a trivet?



                              H

                              All opinions and ignorance my own



                              From: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)

                              <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>

                              [mailto:_Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_

                              (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com) <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>] On

                              Behalf Of _Wyatt505@..._ (mailto:Wyatt505@...)

                              <mailto:Wyatt505%40aol.com>

                              Sent: Monday, July 19, 2010 10:50 PM

                              To: _Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com)

                              <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>

                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Fw: Comment: "Slovak Grandmothers"



                              while reading about Slovak grandmothers (starru baba nyema gatchie---allay

                              but-y-ma) I imagined that I could actually smell my baba's Sunday chicken

                              soup....and home-made noodles made on a danko and don't forget the parsley

                              root...! Jim Stroke (Straka)

                              __jimstroke@..._ (mailto:_jimstroke@...)

                              <mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:_jimstroke%40aol.com>_

                              (mailto:_jimstroke@..._ (mailto:jimstroke@...)

                              <mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com><mailto:jimstroke%40aol.com>)



                              In a message dated 7/18/2010 10:43:11 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,

                              _lbrieda@..._ (mailto:lbrieda@...)

                              <mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com><mailto:lbrieda%40yahoo.com>

                              writes:



                              I wanted to share with you a comment I received today on a post about

                              Slovak

                              grandmothers. Thought you may enjoy it.



                              ________________________________



                              Comment:

                              Here is my story about my grandmother.

                              That initial statement about grandmothers is absolutely correct! For about

                              five

                              or seven years (end of my high school years and beginning of college

                              years) I

                              used to sleep at my grandmother's place almost every Saturday mostly to

                              avoid my

                              parent's questions "where have you been all night?" or "What time did you

                              come

                              in the morning?" She happened to live in a center of a city of Trencin in

                              Slovakia so anywhere I've been all night it was a shorter trip to bed to

                              here

                              place then my home. And she has been covering my night trips, unless she

                              sometimes mentioned something unintentionally or undirectly to my parents.

                              But

                              the point is that for all those years my alarm clock was a wonderfull mix

                              of

                              smells of all the components of food she's been cooking and baking for a

                              Sunday

                              lunch. Sunday lunch was allways a big thing. Traditionally the finest and

                              largest lunch in a week. She used to keep traditions: fridays-no meat,

                              Saturdays-some simple but substantial food such as Baked Potatoes with

                              Sauerkraut (Pečené Zemiaky s Kyslou Kapustou) for example, Sunday-the best

                              lunch

                              in a week allways made of some kind of meat and some cake, Mondays,

                              Tuesdays and

                              sometimes Wednesdays leftovers from Sunday, Wednesdays, Thursdays

                              whatever. So,

                              on Sundays she used to wake up about 8AM and started preparing a lunch

                              soon

                              after. Sometime between 9:30AM and 10:30AM I started smelling an alarm

                              clock

                              from kitchen-the smell of food and also hearing the alarm clock from

                              kitchen too

                              which was a mass a live radio broadcast from a different churches in

                              Slovakia. I

                              woke up, had a breakfast already on a table, talked to my grandmama and

                              listening following humorous radio programs, (one of them I listen to

                              until

                              today from podcasts here in the US is "Pálenica Borisa Filana") while

                              waiting

                              for a lunch. I remember all four burners on her gas range and the oven

                              working

                              all at the same time, lot of dishes and food and ingrediences all around

                              the

                              kitchen counter. That smell comming out of a pots and oven was

                              unforgetable. And

                              no wonder why. She u!

                              sed to m

                              ake everything from scratch, no frozen or canned food or semi-product

                              unless

                              absolutelly necessary, fresh-no “previously frozen” meat, fresh

                              vegetables from

                              our garden or from farmers market. If she used tomato it tasted like a

                              tomato.

                              If she used an egg it was a large brown egg with a dark orange thick

                              yolk...

                              Anyway, till these days I do not understand how she was able to handle

                              making

                              five, six or seven different kinds of food at the same time. And all

                              within

                              three hours. I remember when the bells of St. Martin's cathedral in

                              Bratislava

                              started to clang in the radio she started putting plates on the table and

                              pouring aperitif into a glass shots. It was either some better kind of

                              Borovička

                              (Juniper Brandy) such as Juniperus, or homemade moonshine - slivovica

                              (Slivovitz, Plum distilate) or Hruškovica (pear distillate). Sometimes I

                              could

                              not even see it. You now why, too many of that kind of stuff a night

                              before. In

                              those situations I could not wait for a chicken soup. Actually not chicken

                              but

                              hen soup. And there IS a difference between chicken and a hen soup. So,

                              Sundays

                              lunch always consisted of a hen of beef soup with a homemade noodles. If

                              beef

                              soup then with a marrow bones if possible. I loved a hot marrow from a

                              bones to

                              put on a piece of bread salt it and eat it quickly before it cools.

                              Regardless

                              of what soup it was it smells great also because of all kinds of

                              vegetables in

                              it such as kholrabi (kaleráb), one whole unpealed onion, two or three

                              garlics,

                              celery root (celer), carrots, parsnips (petržlen), one leek (pór), savoy

                              cabbage

                              (kel), green parts of celery root in a bunch (she called it vecheť),

                              parsley

                              (petržlenová vňať), and not sure what else. I really liked all vegetables

                              from

                              soup but savoy cabbage was my most favorite. With little salt on it, I

                              loved it.

                              Her soups were always awesome. So, the first course was a soup with

                              noodles,

                              second the vegetables from a soup, third a meat of a soup if it was a beef

                              or

                              marrow, my dad liked hen's neck. The main course usually was a bread!

                              ed fried

                              pork (vyprážaný bravčový rezeň or šňicľa) or fried veal steak

                              (viedenský

                              rezeň-Wiener Shnitzel) or fried breaded chicken with skin attached (kuraci

                              rezeň). It came with cooked potato with butter and parsley flakes. Another

                              days

                              it could be whole baked chicken with stuffing in it and also separately

                              baked in

                              a piece of dish called “Srnčí chrbát” with a rice. Or it could be roast

                              pork

                              (bravčové pečené) with steamed dumplings (parená knedľa) and cabbage

                              (dusená

                              kapusta). Sometimes it was baked duck or goose, or Tenderloin on Cream

                              (Sviečková na Smotane), and many other dishes. And allways some sort of

                              fresh or

                              canned salad(depending or time of a year), like cucumber salad (uharkový š

                              alát)

                              (hlávkový šalát, don't know the english name), or tomato salad (rajčinový

                              šalat)

                              or canned salads made of cucumbers, culiflower, cabbage, grean beans,

                              mushrooms,

                              etc...(zavárané všeličo, uhorky, karfiol, čalamáda, huby, atď,) or

                              canned

                              fruits compot (Kompót). Obviously, it would be no Sunday without some kind

                              of a

                              sweat treat. I can not name all deserts, but among most known are Poppy

                              Seed and

                              Nut Roll (Makovník a Orechovník), apple roll (štrúdľa), (bábovka,

                              mrezovnik),

                              plum or cherry or apricot cakes (slivkový, čerešňový, višňový, marhuľ

                              ový koláč,

                              atď). After all that food feeling stuffed enough we (me, my grandmom, and

                              often

                              my parents) moved to a living room talking, watching a TV or falling

                              asleep.

                              After some time, she brought a bottle of beer for everyone, or took out a

                              bottle

                              of some kind of digestiv-cordial (Becherovka, Demenovka, Angelika liker,

                              atd.).

                              Well, I can say, Sunday lunches was always a ceremony, although mostly the

                              same,

                              I 've been looking for it again and again and I so much miss it last seven

                              years.

                              And I must mention my another grandmother living in a village and her

                              sometimes

                              experimental cousine that's just another big story. I've been especially

                              looking

                              for The village feast (hody) and the village she lives in has it twice a

                              year.

                              And for her baked dishes then she mekes in a wood burning stove that are

                              much

                              more delicious than the same thing baked in a gas burning oven that she

                              has as

                              well.

                              Big big thanks to all Slovak grandmamas because I am sure 99% Slovak

                              grandmamas

                              are like mine. They make their grandkinds happy even they do not need to.

                              I am

                              sure if they have a choice of playing slot machines in a casino or cooking

                              for

                              us, they would choose to make us happy.



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Matchett
                              Lubos, That is a nice looking trivet from Tesco. We got the bus to stop at Tesco (Helene s tour) because some people wanted futbal tee shirts and me and
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jul 28 4:52 PM
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Lubos, That is a nice looking trivet from Tesco. We got the bus to
                                stop at Tesco (Helene's tour) because some people wanted futbal tee
                                shirts and me and another woman wanted curling irons. What a bargain
                                just six euros for a curling iron at Tesco. Julia M.

                                On Jul 20, 2010, at 10:14 AM, Lubos Brieda wrote:

                                > Funny, so I figured I'll go on slovak google and see what I can
                                > find. And there
                                > is an identically looking trivet on Tesco website. They call it
                                > "podlo�ka pod
                                > hrniec", trivet for under a pot.
                                > http://www.tescoma-eshop.sk/stolovanie/vyrobky-z-dreva-a-skla/woody/podlozka-pod-hrniec-19-cm-1101.html
                                >
                                > -- Lubos Brieda --


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