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Traditional agriculture--31

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  • Fedor, Helen
    I m back from my trip. Let the agriculture continue! Growing vegetables is much more demanding than growing grain. In spite of this, all work associated with
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 7, 2010
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      I'm back from my trip. Let the agriculture continue!



      Growing vegetables is much more demanding than growing grain. In spite of this, all work associated with growing vegetables was done by hand as late as the 1930s. Owners of smaller parcels of land continued to work manually until the collectivization of agriculture. Their basic tools were hoes, spades, and rakes. Wooden row-makers (this is metal, but gives the idea < http://www.webbsdirect.co.uk/images/products/medium/525104.jpg > were used to make rows, and two-teeth spades (something like this? < http://www.singletracks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/mccloud_trailbuilding_tool.jpg >) were used to gather the harvested crops. In this way, hoe-farming technology, using much manual labor (done mainly by women), survived.

      Farmers used a variety of ways to store and preserve large amounts of vegetables through the winter for their own needs and for sale. Carrots, celery, kohlrabi, and beets were buried in hollows (hroble) and covered with clay and straw. Parsley and kale were stored in the earth in rows, and were covered with hay or straw, and then covered over with earth. Smaller amounts of vegetables were placed in sand in cellars and storage rooms. Garlic and onions were bound into bundles and were put in the attic to finish drying. Cabbage was cut up and put into barrels. In Za'horie, cucumbers were also preserved in this way.

      Since the beginning of the 20th century, an important role in the development of vegetable growing in Slovakia was played by Bulgarian vegetable growers, who settled around large towns and industrial centers. Their life was unusual in terms of their culture and labor organization. They formed production collectives and worked together on leased land. They lived together, ate together, and also worked together. Among their production specialties were spreading the seeds of new, unknown-until-then thermophilic plants [greenhouse varieties of plants???], new methods of irrigation (a wheel pump driven by horses, distribution of water to rows by free overflow), etc.(7).

      H
      All opinions my own


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