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Re: [Slovak-World] Traditional agriculture--26

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  • Marycay Doolittle
    We do this with the garlic we grow, about 5,000 heads. We put it in a large screen type of thing with sides and the white skins fly away with the wind. It s
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 23, 2010
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      We do this with the garlic we grow, about 5,000 heads. We put it in a large screen type of thing with sides and the white skins fly away with the wind. It 's actually fun to do if we don't have to do all in one day, but we do need a good wind so we do when we have the right conditions. A smaller sieve type of utenile works also.

      Marycay


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Fedor, Helen
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 10:48 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Traditional agriculture--26



      One of the oldest ways of cleaning the grain was winnowing: tossing it up into the wind, using a shovel ( this photo's from Portugal, 1955 < http://cache2.asset-cache.net/xc/2716347.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=45B0EB3381F7834DEBFF017BA9CE60448AB3D05170B636BF5223CE6E4BAF89B1 >), which carried away the husks and small impurities. This technique, called viatie (blowing) generally survived in Slovakia until the middle of the 19th century, when the first hand-operated cleaners (fuka'r, rajta'r) < http://www.scvp.cz/tarnavsk%FD/020403%20fukar.jpg > started to appear in the countryside. In the 20th century, winnowing was used only sporadically, or as a supporting technique, for small amounts of grain.

      Winnowing has not changed over the course of its existence. The first step is to pick out the straw residue and stems[?] of the threshed grain, then to put it through a large-mesh sieve, which catches the biggest impurities. The grain is then put through a finer sieve. In this way, the processed grain is finally winnowed using a special wooden shovel < http://www.cowanauctions.com/images/257.jpg > (vejac~ka). This work, done mainly by men, took place in a barn that had an opening on all sides, in order to create a draft. Farmers in southern Slovakia, and also poor farmers elsewhere, did the winnowing in the open.

      Pouring grain, poppy seed, or legumes from a skep basket < http://www.cepolina.com/photo/object/basket/4/basket_skep_China_agriculture.jpg > onto a sheet was a variant on winnowing. This method has survived in the Slovak countryside to the present day, and is used mainly by women, for smaller amounts of crops.

      According to ethnological sources, winnowing was also used in neighboring areas in the 19th century. Thus, the differences between the various areas were mainly when factory-made mechanical cleaners came into use.(5)

      H
      All opinions my own

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