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Traditional agriculture--15

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  • Fedor, Helen
    Let me know if either of the longer paragraphs get cut off. H All opinions my own Growing Grain As late as the first half of the 20th century, a common way
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 7, 2010
      Let me know if either of the longer paragraphs get cut off.

      H
      All opinions my own



      "Growing Grain"

      As late as the first half of the 20th century, a common way of sowing grain in Slovakia was by hand. A farmer carried the seed in a sheet (rozsievka, s~ijac~ka, trakovica, pudrus~a, plachetka) that had four strings attached to it. He held two of them in his left hand, while the other two were tied around his neck; he used his right hand to strew the seed around the field. If the piece of land were wide, then seed was strewn after every step, first on one side and then the other. On sloping land, sowing started at the lower end of the field and proceeded uphill. The density of the grain sown varied: on less fertile soils it was usually strewn more thickly. Before it was sown, grain was carefully selected and cleaned. Sowing time depended on the local topography and climate. Winter grains were usually sown September-October, and spring grains were sown after the snow had melted and it was possible to prepare the soil. The sown grain was then harrowed.

      Sowing machines were used in Slovakia first on country estates, in about the 1930s, and also on the wealthier farms in lowland areas. In the northern, more mountainous regions, sowing by hand survived until as late as the collectivization of agriculture. It was considered more economical and did not requite the purchase of a drill and a team of animals.

      In addition to sowing on plowed and prepared soil, other ways of digging in the seed also survived in Slovakia. In some villages in Kysuce < http://www.slovensko-privat.sk/domain/slovensko-privat/files/tipy-na-vylet/kysuce/kysuce.jpg > and Gemer, people used to sow rye at the same time as they harvested potatoes; they first took out the potatoes and then dug in the grain. In Horehronie < http://www.iz.sk/images/maps/mapa-region-sr-horehronie.png >, another method of sowing survived as late as the first half of the 20th century. An area of land was first fertilized by kos~arovanie (using sheepfolds to pen the sheep), then digging the land with hoes, sowing the grain, followed by running the flock of sheep through the field, which not only trampled down the soil, but also pushed the sown seed deeper. This method was not unique to Slovakia; during the Middle Ages it was widely used in other countries of Central and Western Europe. Both of these latter techniques were only supplementary [not the widespread way of doing things], typical of poor farms without teams of animals or sheep.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Joe Armata
      Yup, the last paragraph got truncated for me after the widespread . Joe
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 7, 2010
        Yup, the last paragraph got truncated for me after "the widespread".

        Joe



        > Let me know if either of the longer paragraphs get cut off.
        >
        > H All opinions my own
        >
        >
        >
        > "Growing Grain"
        >
        > As late as the first half of the 20th century, a common way of sowing
        > grain in Slovakia was by hand. A farmer carried the seed in a sheet
        > (rozsievka, s~ijac~ka, trakovica, pudrus~a, plachetka) that had four
        > strings attached to it. He held two of them in his left hand, while
        > the other two were tied around his neck; he used his right hand to
        > strew the seed around the field. If the piece of land were wide,
        > then seed was strewn after every step, first on one side and then the
        > other. On sloping land, sowing started at the lower end of the field
        > and proceeded uphill. The density of the grain sown varied: on less
        > fertile soils it was usually strewn more thickly. Before it was
        > sown, grain was carefully selected and cleaned. Sowing time depended
        > on the local topography and climate. Winter grains were usually sown
        > September-October, and spring grains were sown after the snow had
        > melted and it was possible to prepare the soil. The sown grain was
        > then harrowed.
        >
        > Sowing machines were used in Slovakia first on country estates, in
        > about the 1930s, and also on the wealthier farms in lowland areas.
        > In the northern, more mountainous regions, sowing by hand survived
        > until as late as the collectivization of agriculture. It was
        > considered more economical and did not requite the purchase of a
        > drill and a team of animals.
        >
        > In addition to sowing on plowed and prepared soil, other ways of
        > digging in the seed also survived in Slovakia. In some villages in
        > Kysuce <
        > http://www.slovensko-privat.sk/domain/slovensko-privat/files/tipy-na-vylet/kysuce/kysuce.jpg
        > > and Gemer, people used to sow rye at the same time as they
        > harvested potatoes; they first took out the potatoes and then dug in
        > the grain. In Horehronie <
        > http://www.iz.sk/images/maps/mapa-region-sr-horehronie.png >, another
        > method of sowing survived as late as the first half of the 20th
        > century. An area of land was first fertilized by kos~arovanie (using
        > sheepfolds to pen the sheep), then digging the land with hoes, sowing
        > the grain, followed by running the flock of sheep through the field,
        > which not only trampled down the soil, but also pushed the sown seed
        > deeper. This method was not unique to Slovakia; during the Middle
        > Ages it was widely used in other countries of Central and Western
        > Europe. Both of these latter techniques were only supplementary [not
        > the widespread
        >
      • Fedor, Helen
        Thanks for letting me know, Joe. I ll let my IT people know that their suggestion didn t work after all. H From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 7, 2010
          Thanks for letting me know, Joe. I'll let my IT people know that their suggestion didn't work after all.

          H

          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Joe Armata
          Sent: Monday, June 07, 2010 3:53 PM
          To: Fedor, Helen; Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Traditional agriculture--15



          Yup, the last paragraph got truncated for me after "the widespread".

          Joe

          > Let me know if either of the longer paragraphs get cut off.
          >
          > H All opinions my own
          >
          >
          >
          > "Growing Grain"
          >
          > As late as the first half of the 20th century, a common way of sowing
          > grain in Slovakia was by hand. A farmer carried the seed in a sheet
          > (rozsievka, s~ijac~ka, trakovica, pudrus~a, plachetka) that had four
          > strings attached to it. He held two of them in his left hand, while
          > the other two were tied around his neck; he used his right hand to
          > strew the seed around the field. If the piece of land were wide,
          > then seed was strewn after every step, first on one side and then the
          > other. On sloping land, sowing started at the lower end of the field
          > and proceeded uphill. The density of the grain sown varied: on less
          > fertile soils it was usually strewn more thickly. Before it was
          > sown, grain was carefully selected and cleaned. Sowing time depended
          > on the local topography and climate. Winter grains were usually sown
          > September-October, and spring grains were sown after the snow had
          > melted and it was possible to prepare the soil. The sown grain was
          > then harrowed.
          >
          > Sowing machines were used in Slovakia first on country estates, in
          > about the 1930s, and also on the wealthier farms in lowland areas.
          > In the northern, more mountainous regions, sowing by hand survived
          > until as late as the collectivization of agriculture. It was
          > considered more economical and did not requite the purchase of a
          > drill and a team of animals.
          >
          > In addition to sowing on plowed and prepared soil, other ways of
          > digging in the seed also survived in Slovakia. In some villages in
          > Kysuce <
          > http://www.slovensko-privat.sk/domain/slovensko-privat/files/tipy-na-vylet/kysuce/kysuce.jpg
          > > and Gemer, people used to sow rye at the same time as they
          > harvested potatoes; they first took out the potatoes and then dug in
          > the grain. In Horehronie <
          > http://www.iz.sk/images/maps/mapa-region-sr-horehronie.png >, another
          > method of sowing survived as late as the first half of the 20th
          > century. An area of land was first fertilized by kos~arovanie (using
          > sheepfolds to pen the sheep), then digging the land with hoes, sowing
          > the grain, followed by running the flock of sheep through the field,
          > which not only trampled down the soil, but also pushed the sown seed
          > deeper. This method was not unique to Slovakia; during the Middle
          > Ages it was widely used in other countries of Central and Western
          > Europe. Both of these latter techniques were only supplementary [not
          > the widespread
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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