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Re: Pepper

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  • votrubam
    ... They re peppers, but if the Slovaks were looking for a generic label, they d certainly use the diminutive, _papric~ky_, e.g., palive papricky, but the
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
      > in terms of biology/translation.

      They're peppers, but if the Slovaks were looking for a generic label, they'd certainly use the diminutive, _papric~ky_, e.g., palive papricky, but the usual word is just, as you said, Ben, feferonky, less often feferony.

      > feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may
      > be related to the German Pfeffer.

      It's Standard Slovak, Ron. And yes, it's related to German and Italian (peperoni -- no matter that American English uses the Italian word for "peppers" to refer to sausages/salami).

      All these words for the vegetable/fruit, including the English word _pepper(s)_, were derived from the spice, pepper. When peppers, the vegetable/fruit, began to appear in Europe, many more were hot. It took a lot of cross-breeding to get them consistently "sweet" the way the major varieties are today.

      Martin
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