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Pepper

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  • votrubam
    ... There s an overlap, Barbara: Vegetables (fruit, actually): English: pepper = Slovak: paprika Spices: English: paprika = Slovak: paprika English: pepper =
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
      > what the Slovak word for Pepper would be?
      > Red/Green/Yellow Pepper not Black Pepper.

      There's an overlap, Barbara:

      Vegetables (fruit, actually):

      English: pepper = Slovak: paprika

      Spices:

      English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
      English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie


      Martin
    • Ben Sorensen
      So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now... Ben  ________________________________ From: votrubam To:
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
        So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
        Ben 




        ________________________________
        From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, April 27, 2010 10:34:31 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Pepper

         
        > what the Slovak word for Pepper would be?
        > Red/Green/Yellow Pepper not Black Pepper.

        There's an overlap, Barbara:

        Vegetables (fruit, actually):

        English: pepper = Slovak: paprika

        Spices:

        English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
        English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie

        Martin







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        ... You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara s query what word to use to communicate that she s allergic to peppers. Martin
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
          >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
          >>
          >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
          >>
          >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
          >>
          >> Spices:
          >>
          >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
          >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
          >>
          >> Martin


          > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...

          You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.


          Martin
        • cerrunos1@yahoo.com
          Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation. It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her. I am glad you are here!!! Ben Sent
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
            Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation. It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her.
            I am glad you are here!!!
            Ben
            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

            -----Original Message-----
            From: "votrubam" <votrubam@...>
            Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 16:43:08
            To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper

            >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
            >>
            >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
            >>
            >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
            >>
            >> Spices:
            >>
            >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
            >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
            >>
            >> Martin


            > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...

            You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.


            Martin





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ron
            You don t get off that easily, Ben. Where did you come up with feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may be related to the German Pfeffer. Ron
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
              You don't get off that easily, Ben. Where did you come up with feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may be related to the German Pfeffer.

              Ron


              >>So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
              Ben <<

              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, cerrunos1@... wrote:
              >
              > Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation. It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her.
              > I am glad you are here!!!
              > Ben
              > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: "votrubam" <votrubam@...>
              > Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 16:43:08
              > To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper
              >
              > >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
              > >>
              > >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
              > >>
              > >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
              > >>
              > >> Spices:
              > >>
              > >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
              > >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
              > >>
              > >> Martin
              >
              >
              > > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
              >
              > You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.
              >
              >
              > Martin
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Ben Sorensen
              Hi Ron, It is Slovak... and I bet Martin can give us the eptymology of the word.  If we place bets first, I am with you on the German base.  Here are some
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
                Hi Ron,
                It is Slovak... and I bet Martin can give us the eptymology of the word.  If we place bets first, I am with you on the German base.  Here are some examples of the word:


                http://slovniky.juls.savba.sk/?w=feferonka&c=cae3
                Proof that it is Slovak- and that it means a "small, very piquant pepper."

                http://ke.potraviny.eu/konzervovane-vyrobky/zelenina/feferony-baranie-rohy-hame-1ks-620g.html
                The word, though not in the diminuitive, being used to also connotate "ram horn peppers" (baranie rohy).

                I never thought that we could talk so much about peppers without giving out recipes for 'plnene papriky (stuffed peppers).' I will have to get Milka's recipe now that I brought those up...
                Ben





                ________________________________
                From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tue, April 27, 2010 7:47:55 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper

                 
                You don't get off that easily, Ben. Where did you come up with feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may be related to the German Pfeffer.

                Ron

                >>So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
                Ben <<

                --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, cerrunos1@.. . wrote:
                >
                > Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation . It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her.
                > I am glad you are here!!!
                > Ben
                > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: "votrubam" <votrubam@.. .>
                > Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 16:43:08
                > To: <Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com>
                > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper
                >
                > >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
                > >>
                > >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
                > >>
                > >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
                > >>
                > >> Spices:
                > >>
                > >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
                > >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
                > >>
                > >> Martin
                >
                >
                > > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
                >
                > You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.
                >
                >
                > Martin
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • votrubam
                ... They re peppers, but if the Slovaks were looking for a generic label, they d certainly use the diminutive, _papric~ky_, e.g., palive papricky, but the
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
                  > in terms of biology/translation.

                  They're peppers, but if the Slovaks were looking for a generic label, they'd certainly use the diminutive, _papric~ky_, e.g., palive papricky, but the usual word is just, as you said, Ben, feferonky, less often feferony.

                  > feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may
                  > be related to the German Pfeffer.

                  It's Standard Slovak, Ron. And yes, it's related to German and Italian (peperoni -- no matter that American English uses the Italian word for "peppers" to refer to sausages/salami).

                  All these words for the vegetable/fruit, including the English word _pepper(s)_, were derived from the spice, pepper. When peppers, the vegetable/fruit, began to appear in Europe, many more were hot. It took a lot of cross-breeding to get them consistently "sweet" the way the major varieties are today.

                  Martin
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