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Pepper

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  • votrubam
    ... There s an overlap, Barbara: Vegetables (fruit, actually): English: pepper = Slovak: paprika Spices: English: paprika = Slovak: paprika English: pepper =
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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      > what the Slovak word for Pepper would be?
      > Red/Green/Yellow Pepper not Black Pepper.

      There's an overlap, Barbara:

      Vegetables (fruit, actually):

      English: pepper = Slovak: paprika

      Spices:

      English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
      English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie


      Martin
    • Ben Sorensen
      So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now... Ben  ________________________________ From: votrubam To:
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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        So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
        Ben 




        ________________________________
        From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, April 27, 2010 10:34:31 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Pepper

         
        > what the Slovak word for Pepper would be?
        > Red/Green/Yellow Pepper not Black Pepper.

        There's an overlap, Barbara:

        Vegetables (fruit, actually):

        English: pepper = Slovak: paprika

        Spices:

        English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
        English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie

        Martin







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        ... You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara s query what word to use to communicate that she s allergic to peppers. Martin
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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          >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
          >>
          >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
          >>
          >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
          >>
          >> Spices:
          >>
          >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
          >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
          >>
          >> Martin


          > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...

          You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.


          Martin
        • cerrunos1@yahoo.com
          Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation. It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her. I am glad you are here!!! Ben Sent
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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            Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation. It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her.
            I am glad you are here!!!
            Ben
            Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

            -----Original Message-----
            From: "votrubam" <votrubam@...>
            Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 16:43:08
            To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper

            >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
            >>
            >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
            >>
            >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
            >>
            >> Spices:
            >>
            >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
            >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
            >>
            >> Martin


            > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...

            You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.


            Martin





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ron
            You don t get off that easily, Ben. Where did you come up with feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may be related to the German Pfeffer. Ron
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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              You don't get off that easily, Ben. Where did you come up with feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may be related to the German Pfeffer.

              Ron


              >>So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
              Ben <<

              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, cerrunos1@... wrote:
              >
              > Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation. It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her.
              > I am glad you are here!!!
              > Ben
              > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: "votrubam" <votrubam@...>
              > Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 16:43:08
              > To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper
              >
              > >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
              > >>
              > >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
              > >>
              > >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
              > >>
              > >> Spices:
              > >>
              > >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
              > >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
              > >>
              > >> Martin
              >
              >
              > > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
              >
              > You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.
              >
              >
              > Martin
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Ben Sorensen
              Hi Ron, It is Slovak... and I bet Martin can give us the eptymology of the word.  If we place bets first, I am with you on the German base.  Here are some
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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                Hi Ron,
                It is Slovak... and I bet Martin can give us the eptymology of the word.  If we place bets first, I am with you on the German base.  Here are some examples of the word:


                http://slovniky.juls.savba.sk/?w=feferonka&c=cae3
                Proof that it is Slovak- and that it means a "small, very piquant pepper."

                http://ke.potraviny.eu/konzervovane-vyrobky/zelenina/feferony-baranie-rohy-hame-1ks-620g.html
                The word, though not in the diminuitive, being used to also connotate "ram horn peppers" (baranie rohy).

                I never thought that we could talk so much about peppers without giving out recipes for 'plnene papriky (stuffed peppers).' I will have to get Milka's recipe now that I brought those up...
                Ben





                ________________________________
                From: Ron <amiak27@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tue, April 27, 2010 7:47:55 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper

                 
                You don't get off that easily, Ben. Where did you come up with feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may be related to the German Pfeffer.

                Ron

                >>So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
                Ben <<

                --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, cerrunos1@.. . wrote:
                >
                > Yep Martin- I was thinking in terms of biology/translation . It just seems that this word too could be hazardous for her.
                > I am glad you are here!!!
                > Ben
                > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: "votrubam" <votrubam@.. .>
                > Date: Tue, 27 Apr 2010 16:43:08
                > To: <Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com>
                > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Pepper
                >
                > >> There's an overlap, Barbara:
                > >>
                > >> Vegetables (fruit, actually):
                > >>
                > >> English: pepper = Slovak: paprika
                > >>
                > >> Spices:
                > >>
                > >> English: paprika = Slovak: paprika
                > >> English: pepper = Slovak: cierne korenie
                > >>
                > >> Martin
                >
                >
                > > So how are feferonky classified? I am getting so hungry now...
                >
                > You probably mean in biology, Ben? The response above was to Barbara's query what word to use to communicate that she's allergic to peppers.
                >
                >
                > Martin
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >







                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • votrubam
                ... They re peppers, but if the Slovaks were looking for a generic label, they d certainly use the diminutive, _papric~ky_, e.g., palive papricky, but the
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 27, 2010
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                  > in terms of biology/translation.

                  They're peppers, but if the Slovaks were looking for a generic label, they'd certainly use the diminutive, _papric~ky_, e.g., palive papricky, but the usual word is just, as you said, Ben, feferonky, less often feferony.

                  > feferonky? Dialect? Phonetically it sounds as if it may
                  > be related to the German Pfeffer.

                  It's Standard Slovak, Ron. And yes, it's related to German and Italian (peperoni -- no matter that American English uses the Italian word for "peppers" to refer to sausages/salami).

                  All these words for the vegetable/fruit, including the English word _pepper(s)_, were derived from the spice, pepper. When peppers, the vegetable/fruit, began to appear in Europe, many more were hot. It took a lot of cross-breeding to get them consistently "sweet" the way the major varieties are today.

                  Martin
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