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Food & Eating--25

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  • Helen Fedor
    “Feasting Occasions” In addition to workday meals, whose basic function was to satisfy hunger, there were also periods during the year and holidays when
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2010
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      “Feasting Occasions”

      In addition to workday meals, whose basic function was to satisfy
      hunger, there were also periods during the year and holidays when ritual
      dishes were prepared. Most of these dishes originated long ago and
      contain symbolic ingredients, which is why they are a part of ritual
      cuisine.

      At Christmastime, the folk culture assigns prime importance to
      Christmas Eve. Therefore, great importance was given to the
      preparations for the Christmas Eve feast. The composition of the meals
      and the numerous dishes that are part of this feast primarily symbolized
      wishes for the family's wealth and health. Church decrees determined
      the fasting character of this feast. A fasting soup made from
      sauerkraut, pulses, dried mushrooms, or dried fruit, or a sour soup made
      with flour, is part of the Christmas Eve supper. Pasta, such as noodles
      with poppy seed or filled pies [no doubt the tas~ky that Martin
      mentioned], were also prepared frequently. In most of Slovakia, small
      balls of bread dough-- “opekance,” “bobal’ky,” or
      “pupa’c~ky”--were baked, mixed with melted butter, and
      sprinkled with poppy seeds.

      On Christmas, other pastries and cakes were baked and were also given
      to carolers, shepherds, and servants as a reward. Christmas cakes had
      different shapes and names: “baba,” “s~tedra’k,” “calta,”
      “kuch.” The most expressive[?] regional variation was
      “krac~un,” found in eastern Slovakia. Formerly it was a round
      ritual cake, and the dough contained ingredients such as cereal grains
      and pulses, flax-seeds, garlic, parsley tops, consecrated herbs, and
      holy water that, according to folk belief, would ensure a good harvest,
      good health, and also blessings for the family. In the Middle Ages, the
      consumption of wafers (symbolizing the Eucharist) spread under the
      influence of the Church. Wafers are eaten as the first dish of the
      Christmas Eve supper, and are mostly eaten with a clove of garlic and
      are dipped in honey. Traditionally, fruit is also served, especially
      apples, nuts, and prunes.

      Protestants also used to eat meat, sausages, and aspic from the
      hog-slaughtering at the Christmas Eve supper. However, Catholics and
      Orthodox fasted, and so ate only fish. Formerly, this had been either
      salted or cooked, but the 20th century saw the gradual introduction of
      fish fried in oil and served with potato salad. Spirits, brandy, warm
      brandy--“hriate”-- and wine have always been traditional as
      well.(24) Meals that included meat were cooked on the day after
      Christmas [St. Stephen’s Day] and the following day, because the fast
      was over. On New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day, the same dishes
      were often served as had been at the Christmas Eve supper, particularly
      dishes with ingredients that ensured profit and good luck on the farm in
      the new year, such as lentils, poppy seeds, or pork. Everyone was
      supposed to eat plenty, to ritually ensure food for the upcoming year.
    • William C. Wormuth
      Another Memory: We frequently ate elbow macaroni coated with fried Farina. We fried the Farina in butter until toasty brown then added milk to take away the
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2010
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        Another Memory: We frequently ate elbow macaroni coated with fried Farina. We fried the Farina in butter until toasty brown then added milk to take away the crispiness of the Farina. we then stirred it into the bowl of macaroni dished it out, sprinkled it with sugar and Yum, Yum........

        Vilo





        ________________________________
        From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, April 1, 2010 3:14:01 PM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Food & Eating--25


        “Feasting Occasions”

        In addition to workday meals, whose basic function was to satisfy
        hunger, there were also periods during the year and holidays when ritual
        dishes were prepared. Most of these dishes originated long ago and
        contain symbolic ingredients, which is why they are a part of ritual
        cuisine.

        At Christmastime, the folk culture assigns prime importance to
        Christmas Eve. Therefore, great importance was given to the
        preparations for the Christmas Eve feast. The composition of the meals
        and the numerous dishes that are part of this feast primarily symbolized
        wishes for the family's wealth and health. Church decrees determined
        the fasting character of this feast. A fasting soup made from
        sauerkraut, pulses, dried mushrooms, or dried fruit, or a sour soup made
        with flour, is part of the Christmas Eve supper. Pasta, such as noodles
        with poppy seed or filled pies [no doubt the tas~ky that Martin
        mentioned], were also prepared frequently. In most of Slovakia, small
        balls of bread dough-- “opekance,” “bobal’ky,” or
        “pupa’c~ky”--were baked, mixed with melted butter, and
        sprinkled with poppy seeds.

        On Christmas, other pastries and cakes were baked and were also given
        to carolers, shepherds, and servants as a reward. Christmas cakes had
        different shapes and names: “baba,” “s~tedra’k,” “calta,”
        “kuch.” The most expressive[? ] regional variation was
        “krac~un,” found in eastern Slovakia. Formerly it was a round
        ritual cake, and the dough contained ingredients such as cereal grains
        and pulses, flax-seeds, garlic, parsley tops, consecrated herbs, and
        holy water that, according to folk belief, would ensure a good harvest,
        good health, and also blessings for the family. In the Middle Ages, the
        consumption of wafers (symbolizing the Eucharist) spread under the
        influence of the Church. Wafers are eaten as the first dish of the
        Christmas Eve supper, and are mostly eaten with a clove of garlic and
        are dipped in honey. Traditionally, fruit is also served, especially
        apples, nuts, and prunes.

        Protestants also used to eat meat, sausages, and aspic from the
        hog-slaughtering at the Christmas Eve supper. However, Catholics and
        Orthodox fasted, and so ate only fish. Formerly, this had been either
        salted or cooked, but the 20th century saw the gradual introduction of
        fish fried in oil and served with potato salad. Spirits, brandy, warm
        brandy--“hriate”-- and wine have always been traditional as
        well.(24) Meals that included meat were cooked on the day after
        Christmas [St. Stephen’s Day] and the following day, because the fast
        was over. On New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day, the same dishes
        were often served as had been at the Christmas Eve supper, particularly
        dishes with ingredients that ensured profit and good luck on the farm in
        the new year, such as lentils, poppy seeds, or pork. Everyone was
        supposed to eat plenty, to ritually ensure food for the upcoming year.






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Armata, Joseph R
        ... I think that s called a pasty in English. Joe
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 2, 2010
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          > filled pies [no doubt the tas~ky that Martin mentioned]

          I think that's called a pasty in English.


          Joe
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