Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food & Eating"

Expand Messages
  • William C. Wormuth
    Martin, I had nearly forgotten about Chicory. When I was young Ma used to throw in a handful of chicory when she made the huge pot of coffee, on the coal
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Martin,
      I had nearly forgotten about Chicory. When I was young Ma used to "throw in a handful" of chicory when she made the huge pot of coffee, on the coal stove. The pot remained for hours on the edge of the stove. Jaj! to bily s~tiplave.

      Vili





      ________________________________
      From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thu, April 1, 2010 11:46:47 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food & Eating"


      > Polish dorms in Krakow. Breakfast was often "milk coffee." It
      > looked like coffee and milk in equal proportions; I don't drink
      > coffee so I never tasted it.

      That was what Helen's book calls "white coffee" (biela ka'va). It, along with just milk and hot chocolate, was a traditional (especially children's) breakfast drink, also usual at dinner time. It was ersatz-coffee- flavored milk with no caffeine. The flavor was derived from chicory, a common coffee substitute (no caffeine) in the more distant past.

      Martin







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • helene cincebeaux
      oh joe - you bring back memories - i was in poland in 1959 and that chicory coffee was awful, to me anyways - undrinkable - i switched to tea there. how about
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        oh joe - you bring back memories - i was in poland in 1959 and that chicory coffee was awful, to me anyways - undrinkable - i switched to tea there.

        how about the cold raspberry soup which i liked and the kasha which i didn't. There wasn't much to eat in Warsaw in the summer of 1959. People were still living in ruins, bombs were found in buildings every day and the only real meal was taken at a kind of cafeteria at noon. On the menu - cold fruit soup, kasha and chicory coffee.

        when i got home the first thing i did was look into our refrigerator at the wealth of food there. the second thing was when my mother complained about waiting a few minutes in a line i told her how people in warsaw waited for hours in one line for milk and another for vegetables and another for bread when they could even get them.

        The apartment my Polish family stayed in had bullet holes all over the building's facade and the grandfather's portrait had a bullet hole in it!

        take about a wake up for a cupcake Syracuse U  cheerleader - it was a wonderful experience and changed my life. I am so grateful as it led me to Slovakia!
        helene



        ________________________________
        From: votrubam <votrubam@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, April 1, 2010 11:46:47 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food & Eating"

         
        > Polish dorms in Krakow. Breakfast was often "milk coffee." It
        > looked like coffee and milk in equal proportions; I don't drink
        > coffee so I never tasted it.

        That was what Helen's book calls "white coffee" (biela ka'va). It, along with just milk and hot chocolate, was a traditional (especially children's) breakfast drink, also usual at dinner time. It was ersatz-coffee- flavored milk with no caffeine. The flavor was derived from chicory, a common coffee substitute (no caffeine) in the more distant past.

        Martin







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.