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  • Helen Fedor
    Martin, or anyone else who might know, In a letter I m translating for someone, the writer gives historical information about the village from which the
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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      Martin, or anyone else who might know,
      In a letter I'm translating for someone, the writer gives historical information about the village from which the recipient's parents came, Mura'nska Huta. The writer continues, saying:

      "Vas~a mama, iste to viete, pocha'dzala od Maca, kde sa hovorilo o rodine "V predn~ej u Maca" a v "Zadn~ej u Maca". U Maca v predn~ej by'valo 7 dus~i..."

      [Your mama, as no doubt you know, came from "Maco" [sp?], where the family was described as "in the front of Maco" and "in the rear/back of Maco." Seven persons lived in the front of Maco..."]

      My question is about "u Maca". Does this mean "the Maco house"? The family's name is completely different, and there's no mention of anyone named Maco living there at the time (and the name's not mentioned anywhere else in the letter). Could this be like "the old Anderson House" or "the old Anderson place" even though the Andersons died or moved away 20 years ago?

      And what about "v predn~ej" and "v zadn~ej" (and why the ma:kc~en over the "n"?)? Would there have been two houses on one piece of property or would it have been a large house that, like a duplex, was divided (if not completely, maybe) into two sets of living quarters? The letter says that 7 persons lived in the "front" of the house/property (no word on the "back"). Another, similar, venue is referred to as "U S~ima," although there's no mention there of any "parts".

      H
      All opinions and misinterpretations my own
    • William C. Wormuth
      http://www.zoznam.sk/hladaj.fcgi?co=telzoznam&s=Maca&mesto=&ulica=&psc=0&uto=&net_fixed=1&net_mobile=1&net_alt=1 ________________________________ From: Helen
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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        http://www.zoznam.sk/hladaj.fcgi?co=telzoznam&s=Maca&mesto=&ulica=&psc=0&uto=&net_fixed=1&net_mobile=1&net_alt=1






        ________________________________
        From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, April 1, 2010 11:42:47 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Any ideas?


        Martin, or anyone else who might know,
        In a letter I'm translating for someone, the writer gives historical information about the village from which the recipient's parents came, Mura'nska Huta. The writer continues, saying:

        "Vas~a mama, iste to viete, pocha'dzala od Maca, kde sa hovorilo o rodine "V predn~ej u Maca" a v "Zadn~ej u Maca". U Maca v predn~ej by'valo 7 dus~i..."

        [Your mama, as no doubt you know, came from "Maco" [sp?], where the family was described as "in the front of Maco" and "in the rear/back of Maco." Seven persons lived in the front of Maco..."]

        My question is about "u Maca". Does this mean "the Maco house"? The family's name is completely different, and there's no mention of anyone named Maco living there at the time (and the name's not mentioned anywhere else in the letter). Could this be like "the old Anderson House" or "the old Anderson place" even though the Andersons died or moved away 20 years ago?

        And what about "v predn~ej" and "v zadn~ej" (and why the ma:kc~en over the "n"?)? Would there have been two houses on one piece of property or would it have been a large house that, like a duplex, was divided (if not completely, maybe) into two sets of living quarters? The letter says that 7 persons lived in the "front" of the house/property (no word on the "back"). Another, similar, venue is referred to as "U S~ima," although there's no mention there of any "parts".

        H
        All opinions and misinterpretations my own







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • votrubam
        (Sorry if this ends up being a duplicate; the first reply either vanished or will show up later.) ... That is a representation of the local pronunciation
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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          (Sorry if this ends up being a duplicate; the first reply either vanished or will show up later.)

          > "v predn~ej" and "v zadn~ej" why the ma:kc~en over the "n"?)?

          That is a representation of the local pronunciation (dialect).


          > "u Maca". Does this mean "the Maco house"? The family's name
          > is completely different, and there's no mention of anyone named
          > Maco living there at the time (and the name's not mentioned
          > anywhere else in the letter). Could this be like "the old
          > Anderson House" or "the old Anderson place" even though the
          > Andersons died or moved away 20 years ago?

          Or 100+ years ago. Maco could also have been a long-forgotten person's nickname that became the standard name of that particular locality in the village.


          > Would there have been two houses on one piece of property or
          > would it have been a large house that, like a duplex, was divided

          All of what you say Helen, as well as... e.g., it could also have been two separate farmsteads, not even necessarily next to each other, "the Front Farm 'At Maco's'" and "the Rear Farm 'At Maco's.'" Etc. Only broader context could clarify how the designation(s), "v prednej u Maca," worked in this instance -- from ad-hoc descriptions of adjacent buildings on a single farm through established local place names.


          Martin
        • Helen Fedor
          Unfortunately, there s not much context. The letter goes on to say how many persons lived at u Maca v predn~ej and how much land they had and how many
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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            Unfortunately, there's not much context. The letter goes on to say how many persons lived at "u Maca v predn~ej" and how much land they had and how many animals they raised (not many: 3 cows, 15 hens, and 2 piglets). At "u S~ima" there lived 11 persons, and no animals or land holdings are mentioned.

            Would "in the front part of the Maco place" and "in the rear part of the Maco place" be accurate, yet ambiguous enough to match the original, given that there's not more info to go on?

            H
            All opinions and mistranslations my own



            >>> "votrubam" <votrubam@...> 04/01/10 9:31 PM >>>
            (Sorry if this ends up being a duplicate; the first reply either vanished or will show up later.)

            > "v predn~ej" and "v zadn~ej" why the ma:kc~en over the "n"?)?

            That is a representation of the local pronunciation (dialect).


            > "u Maca". Does this mean "the Maco house"? The family's name
            > is completely different, and there's no mention of anyone named
            > Maco living there at the time (and the name's not mentioned
            > anywhere else in the letter). Could this be like "the old
            > Anderson House" or "the old Anderson place" even though the
            > Andersons died or moved away 20 years ago?

            Or 100+ years ago. Maco could also have been a long-forgotten person's nickname that became the standard name of that particular locality in the village.


            > Would there have been two houses on one piece of property or
            > would it have been a large house that, like a duplex, was divided

            All of what you say Helen, as well as... e.g., it could also have been two separate farmsteads, not even necessarily next to each other, "the Front Farm 'At Maco's'" and "the Rear Farm 'At Maco's.'" Etc. Only broader context could clarify how the designation(s), "v prednej u Maca," worked in this instance -- from ad-hoc descriptions of adjacent buildings on a single farm through established local place names.


            Martin
          • votrubam
            ... Consider ... grew up at Maco s [as the locality was called], and there they would say the family lived [either] at Maco s in the front and [or] at
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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              > pocha'dzala od Maca, kde sa hovorilo o rodine "V predn~ej
              > u Maca" a v "Zadn~ej u Maca". U Maca v predn~ej by'valo 7 dus~i..."


              > Would "in the front part of the Maco place" and "in the rear part of the Maco place" be accurate, yet ambiguous enough to match the original, given that there's not more info to go on?

              Consider ... grew up at Maco's [as the locality was called], and there they would say the family lived [either] "at Maco's in the front" and [or] "at Maco's in the rear." ...


              Martin
            • Helen Fedor
              I think that ll do nicely. It gives a good sense of the original while leaving it just as ambiguous in English. D akujem pekne, Martin. H All opinions my own
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 1, 2010
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                I think that'll do nicely. It gives a good sense of the original while leaving it just as ambiguous in English. D'akujem pekne, Martin.

                H
                All opinions my own



                >>> "votrubam" <votrubam@...> 04/01/10 10:45 PM >>>
                > pocha'dzala od Maca, kde sa hovorilo o rodine "V predn~ej
                > u Maca" a v "Zadn~ej u Maca". U Maca v predn~ej by'valo 7 dus~i..."


                > Would "in the front part of the Maco place" and "in the rear part of the Maco place" be accurate, yet ambiguous enough to match the original, given that there's not more info to go on?

                Consider ... grew up at Maco's [as the locality was called], and there they would say the family lived [either] "at Maco's in the front" and [or] "at Maco's in the rear." ...


                Martin
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