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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food and Eating"--11 Poaching Game

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  • helene cincebeaux
    hi ron - i have heard some really hair-raising tales of stealing horses across the Polish border in communities that were nearby. helene
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 9, 2010
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      hi ron - i have heard some really hair-raising tales of stealing horses across the Polish border in communities that were nearby.

      helene




      ________________________________
      From: Ron <amiak27@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, March 9, 2010 9:08:44 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food and Eating"--11 Poaching Game

       
      I was talking to another Slovak the other day and he told me of his family going into the hills on a regular basis to poach animals - deer or whatever - to feed the family. That matches up with my family tales of poaching fish from the Poprad river.

      I suppose it was a matter of stealing from the local Lord at the time, and later from stealing from the communist system, but in the end boiling down to 1) unjust laws, 2) feeding the family, 3) it tasting better when it was stolen.

      Are there any other stories of poaching traditions out there?

      Ron

      --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
      >
      > Game, fish, and other aquatic animals used to play a larger role in
      > traditional cooking than they do today. There was an abundance of fish
      > in rivers and brooks. Also, fish have been reared in ponds in Slovakia
      > since the 16th century. In addition, many inexpensive saltwater fish
      > were imported, particularly from the North and Baltic seas. Crayfish
      > and frogs were caught in still waters, and just like fish, were eaten
      > primarily during periods of fasting.
      >
      > In folk cuisine, the entrails of animal were also eaten. A frequent
      > meal was mutton entrails, such as liver. Inexpensive beef lungs, tripe,
      > and liver were bought at a butcher’s shop too. Pork entrails were
      > usually consumed at domestic hog-slaughterings, when various meat
      > products were made. Meat consumption increased in Slovak villages
      > during the 20th century. Meals adopted from foreign or middle-class
      > cuisine, such as steaks fried in batter, meatballs, goulash, paprikash,
      > potatoes, stews, and pork roasts, are widespread and very popular.
      > These meals are prepared for Sunday dinner [which takes place at midday]
      > and for various feasts.(16)
      >







      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      Hija Helinka, Of course, horses make delicious konske parky and salam. :0) ________________________________ From: helene cincebeaux To:
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 10, 2010
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        Hija Helinka,

        Of course, horses make delicious konske parky and salam. :0)





        ________________________________
        From: helene cincebeaux <helenezx@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, March 10, 2010 2:03:22 AM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food and Eating"--11 Poaching Game


        hi ron - i have heard some really hair-raising tales of stealing horses across the Polish border in communities that were nearby.

        helene

        ____________ _________ _________ __
        From: Ron <amiak27@yahoo. com>
        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
        Sent: Tue, March 9, 2010 9:08:44 PM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: "Food and Eating"--11 Poaching Game


        I was talking to another Slovak the other day and he told me of his family going into the hills on a regular basis to poach animals - deer or whatever - to feed the family. That matches up with my family tales of poaching fish from the Poprad river.

        I suppose it was a matter of stealing from the local Lord at the time, and later from stealing from the communist system, but in the end boiling down to 1) unjust laws, 2) feeding the family, 3) it tasting better when it was stolen.

        Are there any other stories of poaching traditions out there?

        Ron

        --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
        >
        > Game, fish, and other aquatic animals used to play a larger role in
        > traditional cooking than they do today. There was an abundance of fish
        > in rivers and brooks. Also, fish have been reared in ponds in Slovakia
        > since the 16th century. In addition, many inexpensive saltwater fish
        > were imported, particularly from the North and Baltic seas. Crayfish
        > and frogs were caught in still waters, and just like fish, were eaten
        > primarily during periods of fasting.
        >
        > In folk cuisine, the entrails of animal were also eaten. A frequent
        > meal was mutton entrails, such as liver. Inexpensive beef lungs, tripe,
        > and liver were bought at a butcher’s shop too. Pork entrails were
        > usually consumed at domestic hog-slaughterings, when various meat
        > products were made. Meat consumption increased in Slovak villages
        > during the 20th century. Meals adopted from foreign or middle-class
        > cuisine, such as steaks fried in batter, meatballs, goulash, paprikash,
        > potatoes, stews, and pork roasts, are widespread and very popular.
        > These meals are prepared for Sunday dinner [which takes place at midday]
        > and for various feasts.(16)
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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