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"Food and Eating"--7

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  • Helen Fedor
    “Fruit Dishes” Wild fruits and forest-fruits [berries?] were always picked and eaten as nutritious food supplements. Fruit dishes were prepared in areas
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 2, 2010
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      “Fruit Dishes”

      Wild fruits and forest-fruits [berries?] were always picked and eaten
      as nutritious food supplements. Fruit dishes were prepared in areas
      where much fruit was grown, and the surplus was preserved. These dishes
      were mainly fruit soups, which were cooked from both fresh and dried
      fruit. Usually they were eaten with bread or potatoes, and were
      considered a fasting meal. The most widespread way of preserving fruit
      was drying it. Dried fruit was formerly eaten with bread, and its juice
      was served as a drink and sweetener [Was it juiced before it was
      dried?]. Another traditional way of conserving fruit was to make fruit
      butters without any sugar; in Slovakia, this was made mainly from plums.
      Properly made fruit butter lasted for a couple of years, but before it
      was used it had to be cooked again. Fruit butter was spread on bread,
      mixed with pasta, and used to fill cakes. In folk religion, fruit was a
      symbol of health, beauty, and love, and was therefore considered a
      ceremonial food.(13)


      “Vegetable Oils”

      Vegetable oils were produced in Slovakia not only for cooking and
      healing, but also for lighting. Flax, hemp, poppy, rape [canola], and
      mustard were among traditional oil-bearing crops. Oil was also made
      from sunflower and pumpkin seeds, from nuts, and in times of shortage,
      also from acorns and beech nuts. Until the beginning of the 20th
      century, oil was produced at home. Hucksters from the more productive
      areas used to go around selling oil [see below]. Vegetable oils
      replaced animal fats in cooking mainly during periods of fasting, when
      animal fats were forbidden.



      QUESTION: Does “huckster” here mean “olejkar”? I posted the
      first page (the remaining pages cover Transylvania.) of an article on
      “Wandering Healers, Medicine Hawkers in Slovakia and
      Transylvania” by Bela Gunda in the _Southwestern Journal of
      Anthropology_, vol.5, no.2 (summer 1949), pp.147-50.
    • votrubam
      ... Yes, the word _bobul~ka_ means a berry (edible or not), but it is used only to describe the shape if people need to. The phrase _lesne plody_ stands for
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 2, 2010
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        > Wild fruits and forest-fruits [berries?]

        Yes, the word _bobul~ka_ means a berry (edible or not), but it is used only to describe the shape if people need to. The phrase _lesne' plody_ stands for what's commonly meant by "berries" in English.


        > Dried fruit was formerly eaten with bread, and its juice
        > was served as a drink and sweetener [Was it juiced before it was
        > dried?].

        My guess is that they meant "or," "or" ("and also," "and also"). Drying seems to have gone away if they're still talking about berries here? ("Prune plums" might make it clearer that other plums were not involved, because they didn't grow there.)

        Martin
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