Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Slovak-World] "Food and Eating"--6

Expand Messages
  • Lubos Brieda
    Hi Helen, I forgot if you speak Slovak or not, but if you do, there is a great book you may find interesting. It s called S Vareškou Dvoma Tisícročiami
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 1 7:25 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Helen, I forgot if you speak Slovak or not, but if you do, there is a great book you may find interesting. It's called "S Vareškou Dvoma Tisícročiami" and it documents the evolution of food in the Bratislava region. I'll bring it to the next DC Slovaks meeting if I don't forget.

      -- Lubos Brieda --
      Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
      hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com






      ________________________________
      From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, March 1, 2010 10:45:13 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] "Food and Eating"--6

      Potatoes play an important role in the diet. Their cultivation spread
      to Slovakia from Western Europe, especially during the 19th century, and
      continued from the northern regions towards the south. Originally,
      whole potatoes were boiled or baked in their skins. More complicated
      methods came along gradually: soups, purees, side dishes, and fried in
      fat. Potato dishes were an important supplement to dishes made of
      cereals.

      During the frequent periods when there was no flour, potatoes were made
      into many dishes that are now considered part of Slovak tradition. Many
      kinds of pasta are prepared from a flour-and-potato dough, such as
      “halus~ky,” “s~ulance,” “pirohy,” and potato pancakes.
      In almost the whole of Slovakia, mashed potatoes also used to be added
      to bread dough, which not only gave it a better flavor, but also made it
      last longer [Meaning that the bread stayed fresh longer or that using
      potatoes made the flour “go farther” when there was little of it
      around?]. Potatoes also became an ingredient in a wide range of soups,
      where they were added to vegetables, podders, and sauerkraut. In
      mountainous regions, potatoes were also used as a filling in sausages.
      In recent decades they have also become a common side dish for meals
      containing meat. It can be said that in Slovakia the potato has become
      an equal partner to the foodstuffs that have been traditional for
      hundreds of years.(12)


      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Helen Fedor
      Ahoj Lubos, Yes, I do know Slovak. I ve never heard of this book, so I d be very interested in seeing it. D akujem, H All opinions my own ... Hi Helen, I
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 2 6:55 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Ahoj Lubos,
        Yes, I do know Slovak. I've never heard of this book, so I'd be very
        interested in seeing it.

        D'akujem,
        H
        All opinions my own



        >>> Lubos Brieda <lbrieda@...> 3/1/2010 10:25 PM >>>
        Hi Helen, I forgot if you speak Slovak or not, but if you do, there is
        a great book you may find interesting. It's called "S Vareškou Dvoma
        Tisícročiami" and it documents the evolution of food in the
        Bratislava region. I'll bring it to the next DC Slovaks meeting if I
        don't forget.

        -- Lubos Brieda --
        Slovak recipes: www.slovakcooking.com
        hikes and travel: www.iamlubos.com






        ________________________________
        From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, March 1, 2010 10:45:13 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] "Food and Eating"--6

        Potatoes play an important role in the diet. Their cultivation spread
        to Slovakia from Western Europe, especially during the 19th century,
        and
        continued from the northern regions towards the south. Originally,
        whole potatoes were boiled or baked in their skins. More complicated
        methods came along gradually: soups, purees, side dishes, and fried
        in
        fat. Potato dishes were an important supplement to dishes made of
        cereals.

        During the frequent periods when there was no flour, potatoes were
        made
        into many dishes that are now considered part of Slovak tradition.
        Many
        kinds of pasta are prepared from a flour-and-potato dough, such as
        “halus~ky,” “s~ulance,” “pirohy,” and potato pancakes.
        In almost the whole of Slovakia, mashed potatoes also used to be added
        to bread dough, which not only gave it a better flavor, but also made
        it
        last longer [Meaning that the bread stayed fresh longer or that using
        potatoes made the flour “go farther” when there was little of it
        around?]. Potatoes also became an ingredient in a wide range of
        soups,
        where they were added to vegetables, podders, and sauerkraut. In
        mountainous regions, potatoes were also used as a filling in sausages.

        In recent decades they have also become a common side dish for meals
        containing meat. It can be said that in Slovakia the potato has
        become
        an equal partner to the foodstuffs that have been traditional for
        hundreds of years.(12)


        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ben Sorensen
        Hey all, In Slovakia- a song Z~ivijo is sung to celebrate life- http://pesnicky.orava.sk/component/mjoosic/song/968-zivijo.html   I was wondering.... how
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 4 6:55 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hey all,
          In Slovakia- a song "Z~ivijo" is sung to celebrate life- http://pesnicky.orava.sk/component/mjoosic/song/968-zivijo.html
           
          I was wondering.... how old is this song? What is that language? Is that a dialect, or is it an old precursor to Stur's (or Bernolak's) Slovak? Is it an import?
           
          Thank you!!!!
          Ben






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.