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Fw: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak written language

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  • Helen Fedor
    This past weekend, I was looking at the GC records for a church in my dad s village and found that, for several years, the records were written in Ukrainian,
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1 6:12 AM
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      This past weekend, I was looking at the GC records for a church in my dad's village and found that, for several years, the records were written in Ukrainian, which uses the Cyrillic alphabet.

      H



      >>> George Sirko <gsirko@...> 9/1/2009 12:06 AM >>>
      You mighy mean written in Church Slavonic. I got records of my Fathers birth in Ubla in 1894 from Mormon church. There are 2 tapes of Ubla, One is written in Latin and Hungarian and one is in Church Slavonic. I am having a tough time with the latter.
      George

      --- On Sun, 8/30/09, deeprootsaz <deeprootsaz@...> wrote:


      From: deeprootsaz <deeprootsaz@...>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak written language
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, August 30, 2009, 11:09 PM






      Are you sure the records are in Slovak?
      The records I have switch to cyrillic in the 1850's not Slovak.
      Slovak is not written in cyrillic.

      Mary

      --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, "Carl Kotlarchik" <kotlarchik@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a question about when Slovak became a written language. Because of the policy of Magyarization, I thought that it wasn't until after the separation of Czechoslovakia from Hungary. But I am finding Slovak used during a period in the 1800s in my family's church records. Prior to 1850, I find all the records are in Latin or Hungarian. But beginning in 1850, I find many of them written in Slovak including names and the names of villages. This lasts until about 1878 when everything switches back to Hungarian. I know that in 1848-49, that there was quite a rebellion in the empire and in all of Europe. Would writing in Slovak have been an act of rebellion by some of the clergy?
      > Clearly, later in the century, Magyarization policies stopped this behavior. Anyway, I'm curious if others find this in their family records.
      > CK
      >
















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