Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

Expand Messages
  • BJLK@aol.com
    I m delighted to see that so many memories are being awakened. My own experience is somewhat limited to the midwest; I m a product of Chicago streets. I know
    Message 1 of 93 , Aug 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm delighted to see that so many memories are being awakened. My own
      experience is somewhat limited to the midwest; I'm a product of Chicago
      streets. I know that in Chicago alone there were at least three distinct Slovak
      communities that did not always communicate with each other. (I know that
      New York City had several similar groups.) I'm also remembering other
      Indiana towns that had groups of Slovaks--like Hammond, Gary, and East
      Chicago--where they worked very hard for the steel and oil-refining industries.
      There were also a number of Slovak groups in small towns near Milwaukee (with
      its own robust Slovak community), like Racine and Cudahy. Also, a beloved
      Sokol camp was located in Wisconsin between the towns of East Troy and
      Mukwonago.

      Sokol brings to my mind more Slovak groups in Perth Amboy and Elizabeth,
      New Jersey, and another Sokol camp I remember fondly near New Kensington,
      PA, outside a small town called Braeburn (which itself may no longer exist)
      where I participated in a national slet just after WW2. One of our
      traveling instructors lived in Canton, OH, another old Slovak community. The
      mention of Binghampton, NY, jogged my memory of the many small Slovak Sokol
      groups that dotted the country at one time. Does anyone else recall belonging
      to an active Sokol group and actually participating in their gymnastic
      activities? Besides my family and religious affiliations, Sokol was an
      important source of information about Slovak culture for me. Where else could I
      learn to dance the national Slovak beseda and learn so many of the beautiful
      Slovak folk songs? Or complete in track events in New York's Central
      Park? I never completely appreciated at the time what a wonderful opportunity
      this gave me to enjoy my family's culture so fully, but I now have many
      memories to cherish in my old age.

      Thanks to everyone who is helping us to remember some of our immigrant
      history.

      B. J.
      _________________________
      B. J. Licko-Keel (BJLK@...)


      In a message dated 8/1/2009 3:10:12 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
      daxthewarrior@... writes:

      Thanks for starting a fascinating thread, B.J.

      --- On Sat, 8/1/09, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...> wrote:

      From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, August 1, 2009, 10:50 AM












      Jennie,



      It seems like most of my relatives (both mother and father's family)
      settled around the following:



      Passaic/Clifton/ Garfield, NJ area - work was in the rubber & textile
      factories

      Hazleton, PA - work was in the strip mines.

      Pittsburgh/McKees Port/McKees Rocks - work was in the steel plants

      Chicago - lots of industries that needed laborers

      ...and a few landed in Ohio & Canada



      Some years back, I hit the online phone books and tried to contact some of
      the Wolsko's I had found. The family was never close and, most of the
      time, I was treated very suspiciously even though I told them I was not
      looking for a loan or organ donor. Matter of fact, most could not say for
      certainty that they were Slovak and had little or no interest in such things.



      I'm still in NJ, but rarely go back to Passaic - much has changed, but
      Garfield still has lots of folks with Czech/Slovak/ Rusyn/Polish roots.



      By the way, my paternal grandmother' s maiden name was Scerbak, but I know
      little of her. I was born in '48 and she was gone by then.



      Paul Wolsko



      ----- Original Message -----

      From: j_coulter77

      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

      Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 10:16 AM

      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities



      Thank you Mr. Wolsko for mentioning Passaic!

      I was just about to mention that this was one of the bigger areas of where
      they lived(and still do). Also alot of Slovaks from Passaic settled in the
      City of Garfield.



      Jennie Scerbak-Coulter



      --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@... > wrote:

      >

      > Passaic, New Jersey is another place where many Slovaks wound up - to
      work in the factories. The only pirohy fest around here is at my house, where
      my wife makes them herself.

      >

      > Paul Wolsko

      >

      >

      > ----- Original Message -----

      > From: BJLK@...

      > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

      > Sent: Friday, July 31, 2009 8:04 PM

      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Immigrant Communities

      >

      >

      > At one time (probably about 80 or some years ago, starting around the

      > early 20s of the previous century), Shamrock, Texas, was a destination
      for

      > Slovak immigrants who were part of a homesteading community led by a
      Lutheran

      > pastor (whose name I don't know). My best friend's mother, uncle, and
      her

      > cousin's mother arrived via this route. There are probably no remnants

      > left of this early history, but it might be interesting to check out.

      >

      > Whiting, Indiana, was indeed a thriving Slovak community around the same

      > time. My mother arrived there as a young Slovak teenager to join her
      father

      > who preceded her, along with one of his brothers. St. Paul Slovak

      > Lutheran Church continues to exist, and this past weekend the community
      celebrated

      > its annual Pierogy Fest which continues to honor both its Slovak and

      > Polish roots (even though they are probably now in the minority).

      >

      > I suspect that there might be even more forgotten Slovak enclaves
      scattered

      > across the midwest. The Czech communities in Nebraska and Iowa were also

      > the home of many Slovaks (like my father's cousins from the Quad Cities

      > area) who, because they were in the minority, were not differentiated
      from

      > their close ethnic relatives.

      >

      > This is an interesting subject, and I hope there may be other bits of

      > information lingering in the memories of the remaining "first-generation
      kids"

      > like me.

      >

      > ____________ _________ ____

      > B. J. Licko-Keel (BJLK@...)

      >

      > In a message dated 7/31/2009 9:06:22 A.M. Central Daylight Time,

      > trflynn@... writes:

      >

      > I think there are some settlements of Slovaks in Nebraska and Indiana,
      but

      > I've not heard of any in Texas.

      >

      > ************ **A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2
      easy

      > steps!

      > (http://pr.atwola. com/promoclk/ 100126575x122284 6709x1201493018/
      aol?redir= http://www. freecreditreport .com/pm/default. aspx?sc=668072&
      hmpgID=115& bcd

      > =JulystepsfooterNO1 15)

      >

      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      >

      >

      >

      >

      >

      >

      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links





      **************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
      steps!
      (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1222846709x1201493018/aol?redir=
      http://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc=668072&hmpgID=115&bcd=JulystepsfooterNO115)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • LongJohn Wayne
      What a great thread! I guess everyone was on vacation a couple weeks ago. Not now. ... From: Ben Sorensen Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re:
      Message 93 of 93 , Aug 6, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        What a great thread!

        I guess everyone was on vacation a couple weeks ago.

        Not now.

        --- On Tue, 8/4/09, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:

        From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, August 4, 2009, 1:22 AM






         





        Martin and Ron,

        You both are amazing- when I am at a lost of words, you both write, and all I can say is "why didn't I think of that????" :-)

         

        Thanks for getting me the back on track with the Rusyn Church history. Now 1646 makes sense.

        I am going to ask a very bad question: The Rusyn question gets heated here in America... but rarely in Slovakia.  Can someone explain to me why this is? (I understand the Slovak lack of arguement in this issue. I am looking to understand the basis of the American "heat" in the same question.)  Like I said, I am rather at a loss as the bulk of my "rusinsky" experience is in Slovakia, and infantile here in the states, at best. 

         

        It sparked my curiosity when I heard a heated discussion of who is Slovak and who is Rusyn at the festival in Pittsburgh (Having come back from Slovakia, I couldn't even begin to understand WHY the arguement was even taking place).  Then, when I joined the groups, I realized that I should remain "laissez-faire" on the topic.  To me though, Rusyn people were a Slovak sub-group, much like Slovaks are found in the same manner in Romania....

        Ben



        --- On Tue, 8/4/09, Ron Matviyak <amiak27@yahoo. com> wrote:



        From: Ron Matviyak <amiak27@yahoo. com>

        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        Date: Tuesday, August 4, 2009, 12:26 AM



         



        Ahh, the treacherous grounds were trodden!



        Well Ben, the term Greek Catholic may have several meanings. A quick Google told me they date back to 1200+ when an attempt to re-unite the Eastern & Western churches failed; Some Greeks chose the Roman church and the term was applied to them, to distinguish them from Orthodox.



        More to the point, Grecko Katolicky is often used in Europe to describe the Ruthenian Catholic church, now referred to as Byzantine in the USA. That is how I was using the term as you see from the /// names I applied. The 1646 A.D. Union of Uzhhorod is what created this Ruthenian Catholic Church. For as reliable as it may be, a starting source is http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Ruthenian_ Catholic_ Church

        At http://www.byzcath. org/ they have a link on the left to their forums and one in particular that discusses "Eastern Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Relationship" .



        I had a great uncle who got into all of that hair splitting. I myself don't count how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.



        Uniat is also a descriptive term, as in "Unionist". The Catholics seem to have gotten over the "Protestant" bad meanings, while the Orthodox still use "Uniat" as a pejorative.



        >>> Also, it seems that the plight for recognition for the Rusyn "race/tribe/ people" is a bigger issue in America than in Slovakia.



        Yes, that seems to be the case. The Slovak family is aware and takes it to no extreme. One family that participates in folk gatherings is deliberately raising the kids to speak Slovak, not Rusyn, so it does seem to be as you say. As I mentioned, the Czech family is quite Czech. In the American family they are quite American and they tolerate my interest in Europe and were bemused when I discovered the Rusyn connection - at age 50! I grew up a good Slovak boy in America.



        It seems the Gypsies have a status in Slovakia the way Blacks had in America some decades ago. I can't comment on your trying to convey the Slovak-Rusyn relationship; I might begin to hazard a guess, but good judgment tells me to leave the topic to others!



        Ron



        --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@. ..> wrote:

        >

        > Hi Ron,

        > The basis for the Greek Catholics actually comes about two hundred years earlier, when Byzantium was appealing to Rome and Roman Catholic countries for help against the rising Osmanli (Ottoman Turks.) The 1646 pact is not one that I am familiar with- what exactly happened? Uniate, by the way, is a pejorative term.

        >

        > Also, it seems that the plight for recognition for the Rusyn "race/tribe/ people" is a bigger issue in America than in Slovakia. The term "Rusyn" to many in Slovakia is very malleable- Milka's Babka, for example, speaks a version of Rusyn- a very Spis version. Her other Babka also came from a Rusyn village. They both converted to Catholicism, and do not think of themselves as Rusyn- nor does anyone else in the family. Most Rusyns I know consider themselves Slovaks first- and Rusyn for them is a sub-denomination. It is very much like the people from Saris or Spis, or Podpolanie in my experience.. . just with Rusyn it is a bit deeper as it also signifies a very personal connection to religion.

        >

        > That will probably also fan some fires... but I just "calling it as I see it," based on personal (very personal!) experience.

        >

        > Ben :-)

        > --- On Mon, 8/3/09, Ron Matviyak <amiak27@... > wrote:

        >

        >

        > From: Ron Matviyak <amiak27@... >

        > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > Date: Monday, August 3, 2009, 10:55 AM

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        > Vilo,

        >

        > This ethnic & religious topic is where you must choose your words with extreme care, as most certainly someone will be offended by the most innocently mis-placed adverb or modifier. This is not to criticize anything you said, but to reply and set the stage for additional, peaceful comments!

        >

        > The Rusyn seem to enjoy three major divisions I also like to refer to as tribes, but they also have (at my last reading) 5 major dialects and 2 alphabets (Roman and Cyrillic). I suppose 2 major faiths, the Orthodox and the Greek Catholic (Byzantine). The original Christian faith following paganizm was Orthodoxy, but then the Roman Church and the Hapsburgs wanted the Rusyn citizens of Austria & Hungary 1) to recognize the Pope, and 2) pray for the Hapsburg Emperor instead of the Russian Emperor as the Orthodox did. So some of the Orthodox bishops were persuaded to reunite with the Roman Church in 1646 and the Greek Catholic church was created.

        >

        > The Rusyn of today's Slovakia are referred to as "Presovsky Rusyn"; although the city of Presov is primarily Slovak, it is the seat of the Greek Catholic/Byzantine church in Slovakia. I suspect that they would be Lemko if they lived across the border in Poland. The Boyko tribe lies further east, and is a distinct tribe. Hutsils are the farthest east, and in the best Slavic tradition of confusing things, some claim to be Rusyn and some claim to be distinct and different ....

        >

        > The Rusyn identity was not fully formed at the time of the great migrations to America 1880-1914, and the English and Rusyn languages were different then, compounded by variable transliterations between Cyrillic and Roman alphabets, Thus Rus, Ruski (Russian) and Ruskii (Rusyn) in various forms added to the confusion. Many Rusyn simply identified as "po nashimu", "those who speak as we do". All of this often led to people variously identifying themselves in English as "Russian" or "Slavisch", compounded by the geographical / citizenship identification as Slovak, Hungarian, or even Austrian.

        >

        > Yes, there was an Irish Roman Catholic bishop who refused to honor the 1646 agreement that created the Greek Catholic(GC) /Uniat/Byzantine Church and allowed the GC priests to marry. So the priest from Europe led his flock back to Orthodoxy, which was Russian Orthodoxy - compounding the identity confusion. The result is that many of the "Russian Orthodox" in America are ethnically Rusyn, but are convinced they are Russian.

        >

        > It is great to be a part of the great mish-mash of confusion and to try to sort it all out; it is great to be American and watch the passions ignited by True Believers on one side or another as they argue the divisions and the history, and to stand back and not join in with the "ear slitters" as one cousin in Slovakia referred to the "others".

        >

        > Well, that is enough fuel for the fire for today. My morning coffee is gone.

        >

        > Ron

        >

        > --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@> wrote:

        > >

        > > I believe that "Rusyn" can be broken down into three main "tribes": Lemko, Hutsel and Bojko. Southern Poland was heavily, populated with Lemkyn and they were forced out, (Date Unknown but after WWII).

        > > They moved east along the Karpathian Mountains and south to what was the "tail" end of CzechoSlovakia, "Pod Karpaty Rus", now part of the Ukraine.

        > > I have never heard which division the Rusyns in Slovakia today are. I knew a Slovak who came from Rusyn village and he definitely identified as Slovak although his home village was Rusyn.

        > >

        > > RC churches in Slovakia often appear to be the same, structurally, as Orthodox, Pravoslavne. Slovaks in the east are usually RC or Greek Catholic.

        > >

        > > I have been told that many "Russian Orthodox" churches are really Rusyn. they called themselves Russian because that is the translation, (here in the USA), for Rus.

        > >

        > > I read an article concerning the Greek Catholics Rusyn/Slovak that said these people wanted to form their own parishes and bring their married priests from CzechoSlovakia. The Catholic Bishops refused to allow this so the left the authority of Rome and formed Orthodox churches (Ukrainian and Russian). The article stated that the churh "lost" 20,000 people.

        > >

        > > I would appreciate any "corrections" for this write-up.

        > >

        > > Vilo

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > > ____________ _________ _________ __

        > > From: Ron Matviyak <amiak27@ >

        > > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > > Sent: Monday, August 3, 2009 12:45:10 AM

        > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > >

        > >

        > > Some basic and interesting questions, who is Slovak and who is Rusyn? On the manifests one grandfather claimed Rusyn while the grandmother coming separately claimed Slovak; both came from the same 96% Rusyn village.

        > >

        > > On the other side of the family they come from a village in an area that Magocsi shows in a Rusyn area in 1810 & Slovak area in subsequent maps. The cousins in this village are Greek Catholic but strongly identify as Slovak. If I ever do the research in the church books, it will be interesting to see if I find any trace of identity change from Rusyn to Slovak in the last 200 years.

        > >

        > > In the first village above, I questioned the cousins a few years ago and they definitely identify as Rusini, definitely different from the Moscow Russians (eliminating my confusion of the different declensions and distinctions of "Rus" in Slovak!

        > >

        > > So when you are in Slovakia,as your cousins!

        > >

        > > My aunt in the Czech Republic (moved there after the war) was quite pleased when I was telling her daughter we are ethnic Rusyn and not Slovak. Her daughter didn't know the distinction. It was also nice to have this aunt confirm my information.

        > >

        > > Ron

        > >

        > > --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@ ...> wrote:

        > > >

        > > > I was always told that my Mom's side of the family was Slovak, but perhaps I am part Rusyn. But there was no doubt that they were Roman Catholic, although the churches look more orthodox than Roman.

        > > >

        > > > How does one determine? My grandfather' s town was Parchovany, which seems to be equidistant from the Ukrainian & Hungarian borders.

        > > >

        > > > Was the Ukraine ever part of the Austo-Hungarian empire?

        > > >

        > > > I also do not know why he left. I had always assumed that it was for economic reasons. But there could have been other reasons. I think that when he left, WWI had not started, so I don't think he was avoiding military service.

        > > >

        > > > Chuck

        > > >

        > > > --- On Sun, 8/2/09, maxine <maxine96@ .> wrote:

        > > >

        > > > From: maxine <maxine96@ .>

        > > > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > > > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > > > Date: Sunday, August 2, 2009, 3:06 PM

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > Hi Nick, perhaps I can help you out. Clifton, NJ and the surrounding areas were loaded with Slovaks, Rusyns, etc.

        > > >

        > > > There was also a lot of industry in this area. I believe it was a starting point when the people got off the ships. As far as the church goes, Russian Orth, it is the SAME as Greek Catholic. My church in Perth Amboy, NJ, about 30 min. from Clifton was named St John the Baptist Greek Catholic ORTHODOX church. It is still there. There are several different names for Orthodox and each Sect has a top leader. Those leaders elect the top man, which right now is a Greek person. This person would be on par with the Pope. One of the biggest differences between the Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox Catholic and Russian is that WE choose our leaders and make decisions concerning the church WE ATTEND. Hope this helps. maxine sasala, Perth Amboy, NJ

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > ----- Original Message -----

        > > >

        > > > From: Nick

        > > >

        > > > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > > >

        > > > Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 6:33 AM

        > > >

        > > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > Until the proliferation of the internet almost nothing was known about my family. My father was first generation American, and it appears that they wanted to put europe behind them. Parts of the family said that we were Russian, others Czech but with no supporting documenation.

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > I was able to find out that we were indeed Slovak, and that my grandparents had come over in the late 1890's. They had settled in West Virginia in the coal mining areas of Bluefield, and then for some unknown reason, resettled to Clifton NJ. My grandfather worked as a warper in the Botony Mills.

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > My understanding was that the Coal companies were sponsoring the immigration to the US which explains how they wound up in West Virginia. The part that I don't understand or can't piece together is why they made to move to Clifton NJ. Was this community known amng the Slovaks, or perhaps it was through connections in the Church?

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > Another thing that I recently found was that they did not join the Russian Orthodox Church until they came to New Jersey. In Europe, they were "Greek Catholic" and from what I understand, has no connection to the Russian Orthodox Church.

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > Nick Sekela

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, n8de@ wrote:

        > > >

        > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > From 1890 through 1910, many Slovaks emigrated to Johnstown, PA, and

        > > >

        > > > > Johnstown, NY.

        > > >

        > > > > On the way to Johnstown, NY, some of them, especially those from the

        > > >

        > > > > Zahorie area, stopped and set up 'camp' in Schenectady, NY, to work at

        > > >

        > > > > Edison Electric Company, later to become General Electric.

        > > >

        > > > > The biggest group lived on Cutler Street in Schenectady, where my

        > > >

        > > > > Father and Godfather were born [next door to each other]!

        > > >

        > > > > The Schenectady Slovaks were responsible for the founding and building

        > > >

        > > > > of Sts. Cyril & Methodius Church on Congress Street, one block North

        > > >

        > > > > of Cutler Street.

        > > >

        > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > Don Havlicek

        > > >

        > > > > Edmore, MI

        > > >

        > > > >

        > > >

        > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > Quoting maxine <maxine96@ .>:

        > > >

        > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > I believe Perth Amboy, NJ was a "starting point" for many because it

        > > >

        > > > > > was so close to NY and coming in to port. There are still many,

        > > >

        > > > > > many RusynSlovak people in this area. My grandfather, John Sasala,

        > > >

        > > > > > had a tavern there and it was always packed! From Perth Amboy many

        > > >

        > > > > > went to NE Pa. like Lopez or the surrounding areas for coal. 2

        > > >

        > > > > > years ago I met a cousin, Sam Sasala, from Homer City, Pa. There

        > > >

        > > > > > are streets named after the people who migrated there. It is my

        > > >

        > > > > > understanding that "groups" were formed in different areas

        > > >

        > > > > > because someone from the coal, steel, etc areas went to Slovakia to

        > > >

        > > > > > push coming to America to work! Maxine Sasala

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > ----- Original Message -----

        > > >

        > > > > > From: Paul Wolsko

        > > >

        > > > > > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > > >

        > > > > > Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 10:50 AM

        > > >

        > > > > > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > Jennie,

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > It seems like most of my relatives (both mother and father's

        > > >

        > > > > > family) settled around the following:

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > Passaic/Clifton/ Garfield, NJ area - work was in the rubber &

        > > >

        > > > > > textile factories

        > > >

        > > > > > Hazleton, PA - work was in the strip mines.

        > > >

        > > > > > Pittsburgh/McKees Port/McKees Rocks - work was in the steel plants

        > > >

        > > > > > Chicago - lots of industries that needed laborers

        > > >

        > > > > > ...and a few landed in Ohio & Canada

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > Some years back, I hit the online phone books and tried to contact

        > > >

        > > > > > some of the Wolsko's I had found. The family was never close and,

        > > >

        > > > > > most of the time, I was treated very suspiciously even though I told

        > > >

        > > > > > them I was not looking for a loan or organ donor. Matter of fact,

        > > >

        > > > > > most could not say for certainty that they were Slovak and had

        > > >

        > > > > > little or no interest in such things.

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > I'm still in NJ, but rarely go back to Passaic - much has changed,

        > > >

        > > > > > but Garfield still has lots of folks with Czech/Slovak/ Rusyn/Polish

        > > >

        > > > > > roots.

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > By the way, my paternal grandmother' s maiden name was Scerbak, but

        > > >

        > > > > > I know little of her. I was born in '48 and she was gone by then.

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > Paul Wolsko

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > ----- Original Message -----

        > > >

        > > > > > From: j_coulter77

        > > >

        > > > > > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > > >

        > > > > > Sent: Saturday, August 01, 2009 10:16 AM

        > > >

        > > > > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > Thank you Mr. Wolsko for mentioning Passaic!

        > > >

        > > > > > I was just about to mention that this was one of the bigger areas

        > > >

        > > > > > of where they lived(and still do). Also alot of Slovaks from Passaic

        > > >

        > > > > > settled in the City of Garfield.

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > Jennie Scerbak-Coulter

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@> wrote:

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > Passaic, New Jersey is another place where many Slovaks wound up

        > > >

        > > > > > - to work in the factories. The only pirohy fest around here is at

        > > >

        > > > > > my house, where my wife makes them herself.

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > Paul Wolsko

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > ----- Original Message -----

        > > >

        > > > > > > From: BJLK@

        > > >

        > > > > > > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

        > > >

        > > > > > > Sent: Friday, July 31, 2009 8:04 PM

        > > >

        > > > > > > Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Immigrant Communities

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > At one time (probably about 80 or some years ago, starting around the

        > > >

        > > > > > > early 20s of the previous century), Shamrock, Texas, was a

        > > >

        > > > > > destination for

        > > >

        > > > > > > Slovak immigrants who were part of a homesteading community led

        > > >

        > > > > > by a Lutheran

        > > >

        > > > > > > pastor (whose name I don't know). My best friend's mother, uncle, and her

        > > >

        > > > > > > cousin's mother arrived via this route. There are probably no remnants

        > > >

        > > > > > > left of this early history, but it might be interesting to check out.

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > Whiting, Indiana, was indeed a thriving Slovak community around the same

        > > >

        > > > > > > time. My mother arrived there as a young Slovak teenager to join

        > > >

        > > > > > her father

        > > >

        > > > > > > who preceded her, along with one of his brothers. St. Paul Slovak

        > > >

        > > > > > > Lutheran Church continues to exist, and this past weekend the

        > > >

        > > > > > community celebrated

        > > >

        > > > > > > its annual Pierogy Fest which continues to honor both its Slovak and

        > > >

        > > > > > > Polish roots (even though they are probably now in the minority).

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > I suspect that there might be even more forgotten Slovak

        > > >

        > > > > > enclaves scattered

        > > >

        > > > > > > across the midwest. The Czech communities in Nebraska and Iowa were also

        > > >

        > > > > > > the home of many Slovaks (like my father's cousins from the Quad Cities

        > > >

        > > > > > > area) who, because they were in the minority, were not

        > > >

        > > > > > differentiated from

        > > >

        > > > > > > their close ethnic relatives.

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > This is an interesting subject, and I hope there may be other bits of

        > > >

        > > > > > > information lingering in the memories of the remaining

        > > >

        > > > > > "first-generation kids"

        > > >

        > > > > > > like me.

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > ____________ _________ ____

        > > >

        > > > > > > B. J. Licko-Keel (BJLK@)

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > In a message dated 7/31/2009 9:06:22 A.M. Central Daylight Time,

        > > >

        > > > > > > trflynn@ writes:

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > I think there are some settlements of Slovaks in Nebraska and

        > > >

        > > > > > Indiana, but

        > > >

        > > > > > > I've not heard of any in Texas.

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > ************ **A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in

        > > >

        > > > > > just 2 easy

        > > >

        > > > > > > steps!

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > (http://pr.atwola. com/promoclk/ 100126575x122284 6709x1201493018/ aol?redir= http://www. freecreditreport .com/pm/default. aspx?sc=668072& hmpgID=115& bcd

        > > >

        > > > > > > =JulystepsfooterNO1 15)

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > > >

        > > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > > >

        > > >

        > > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > >

        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > > >

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > >

        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        > >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.