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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Work visas

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  • William F Brna
    Ben, I m amazed that you can t see the fundamental difference between the GOP and liberals. It s really quite simple, the liberals are in and the GOP is out
    Message 1 of 32 , Jul 1, 2009
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      Ben,

      I'm amazed that you can't see the fundamental difference between the GOP
      and liberals. It's really quite simple, the liberals are in and the GOP
      is out and wants in. If the GOP gets back in, we will have the same
      situation with the liberals. That is the only difference.

      Bill Brna

      On Tue, 30 Jun 2009 18:52:12 -0700 (PDT) Ben Sorensen
      <cerrunos1@...> writes:



      Yes, but in this case (the case of the Slovak Republic and Czech
      Republic), he meant that the same politicians were in charge. I am NOT so
      sure that this is true- but I would not be surprised. However, it is
      kinda true in America... I can barely see the difference between the GOP
      and liberals.
      I am about to get shot.... so... adieu.... :-)
      ben

      --- On Tue, 6/30/09, ssultonia <ssultonia@...> wrote:

      From: ssultonia <ssultonia@...>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Work visas
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, June 30, 2009, 9:15 PM

      Ben,
      Good comment from the Czech diplomat only I would offer one variation -
      different pigs, same ethics!
      Bill
      --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@. ..>
      wrote:
      >
      > I would argue that their opportunities are just as vast in
      Nitra/Zilina/ Bratislava. The same firms run the show there as in, say,
      DC. IKEA, Shell, and Tesco (which is a British version of Wal-Mart...)
      are major employers. I personally felt that I had more LIFE for the
      money, and less things. Milka, on the other hand disagrees with me. She
      likes being able to be independent, I liked being part of a real
      community. (Does that make me communist? kidding....)
      >
      > There is another side to this. I was thinking of studying
      ethnomusicology, but upon doing a job search, I now am afraid that I
      would have a field of study that I love, and a job market to loathe. In
      Slovakia, I could find a job in no time in the field... but paying of my
      student loan? NOT a chance. Credit ratings mean nothing in Slovakia for
      the most part, but watching Blanket after MJ's death... I can't do that
      to Niki. I have excellent credit now, and refuse to blow it. Now, if the
      DOE could find a way to accept money from SK based banks, and if I can
      make a salary that allows me to live ok there and pay down the loan-
      well- the course of study as well as my place of residence is decided.
      :-P I can't find a job in either music or history here in the States, and
      my diploma is from a NY college!!!!!
      >
      > Gegerly, I wouldn't fear this government any more than the last one.
      :-) As a Czech diplomat told me about the change-over from communism to
      capitalism, what is the difference? The same pigs are still in power....
      :-)
      > Ben
      >
      > --- On Tue, 6/30/09, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@.. .> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@.. .>
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Work visas
      > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      > Date: Tuesday, June 30, 2009, 9:33 AM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Ben, I agree, I easily could live in Slovakia -- wouldn't bother me a
      bit to have to travel for shopping, as it's not such a priority in my
      life any longer -- I've lived in a large city for most of my life, so
      being rural and taking it slower would be a welcome change for me
      personally, my cousins are in the opposite position, which makes their
      mother sad, but at the same time she realizes that their opportunities
      are much more vast here.
      >
      >
      > Caye
      >
      > --- On Mon, 6/29/09, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:
      >
      > From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Work visas
      > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      > Date: Monday, June 29, 2009, 9:52 PM
      >
      > Having lived in both countries-- I just want to politely excuse myself
      from the conversation. :-P Sorry, but it could and potentially will work
      me up, as I have been longing to return to Slovakia.
      >
      > I will leave it at this though- I did not return because of any LACK of
      any amenity. I did, however, have to pay off school loans and America has
      no way for us to pay from SK. I find America all but culturally dead,
      and yet the people so alive- also there is so much I can do with so
      little money here. Slovakia was exactly the opposite. I personally would
      take culture and happiness over manufactured measures of success any day.
      > Ben
      >
      > --- On Mon, 6/29/09, Ron Matviyak <amiak27@yahoo. com> wrote:
      >
      > From: Ron Matviyak <amiak27@yahoo. com>
      > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Work visas
      > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      > Date: Monday, June 29, 2009, 10:30 PM
      >
      > They were brother and sister, 21 & 18 years old, studying to be
      teachers. When not at school they do live with their parents. My first
      distinct memory of them was when the boy was 5 years old on one of my
      visits, so I was able to see them grow up over the years.
      >
      > I was expecting curious, young adults, much as we Americans picture
      teens heading to discover Europe with a backpack. Experienced parents
      have assured me that I experienced nothing that is not "typically
      teenager", but it is small consolation.
      >
      > I have a nephew who came up three summers between 16 and 19, and he
      hasn't been back in the 20+ years since - but he experienced enough to
      form an informed opinion and chooses to live elsewhere. The kids didn't
      give it much of a chance.
      >
      > May they lead rich lives within the limits they choose. It sounds as if
      your cousins came for a different experience.
      >
      > Ron
      >
      > --- In Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@ .>
      wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Ron,
      > >
      > > I'm totally floored by your posting -- were they male or female, what
      were their ages -- where were they from in Slovakia, were they college
      students? Did they still live with their parents?
      > >
      > > My cousin is completely at a loss (but has to take to heart) as to
      the fact that her daughters won't even be in Slovakia to inherit their
      legacy/property because they have such a better chance here in Chicago.
      > >
      > > Very Curious,
      > >
      > >
      > > Caye
      > >
      > >
      > >
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    • Martin Votruba
      ... An opinion on whether inheritance should or should should not be taxed has nothing to do with the argument ... because it s already been taxed. That it
      Message 32 of 32 , Jul 1, 2009
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        > Nah, I disagree with grouping in-family inheritance with

        An opinion on whether inheritance should or should should not be taxed has nothing to do with the argument "... because it's already been taxed." That it has been taxed just as other sources of income have been taxed is a fact.

        The other issue, "should/not be taxed" is a matter of opinion, what's fallacious is the fictitious supporting argument ... because it's already been taxed." The opinion can be supported, e.g., with the argument that "it's in the family/blood/genes..." or other arguments, but not with "... because it's already been taxed," since other sources of income have been taxed before too.

        What's taxed in each instance is the transfer of money from one person to another person. The question is what transfers of money should/not be taxed -- the US tax law contains a multitude of exceptions to taxing transfers of money, so does the Slovak law.

        The Slovak law lists inheritance among the exceptions, the US law does not.

        > that's why there's different parties

        It doesn't have as much to do with parties as one might imagine. Washington didn't change its tax law in this respect under Bush's rightist government. Bratislava hasn't changed its law under Fico's leftist government.


        Martin
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