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Food Traditions - Keeping them alive!!!

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  • Paul Wolsko
    Friends, I rarely post, but thought I d pass along some stuff that s happening in our family. Last week, my son (35) called my wife (his mom) and asked if
    Message 1 of 3 , May 29, 2009
      Friends,

      I rarely post, but thought I'd pass along some stuff that's happening in our family. Last week, my son (35) called my wife (his mom) and asked if she'd spend a day with him to teach him how to make pirohy. She's always made her own, which she learned to make from my mom. We're both Slovak, but her mom bought them from the Uki church and my mom made them from scratch.

      The key to good pirohy is good dough, and they spent an entire day rolling dough and, when the day was done...the kid made pirohy worthy of any Slovak table. They did potato/cheese, cabbage and lekvar (which I always disliked). Important to keep the tradition alive. Yes, "Pierogies" are big in the supermarket, but nothing like the "Real Thing".

      Paul Wolsko



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Donna Manuel
      Wow, Paul, that s wonderful.  I remember my grandmother working in her kitchen, making all kinds of goodies.  Unfortunately we only have a couple of her
      Message 2 of 3 , May 29, 2009
        Wow, Paul, that's wonderful.  I remember my grandmother working in her kitchen, making all kinds of goodies.  Unfortunately we only have a couple of her "recipes."
        Sounds like your wife and son had a great time, and oh boy, now I'm HUNGRY.  
        Have a great evening,
        Donna Manuel

        --- On Fri, 5/29/09, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...> wrote:


        From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...>
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Food Traditions - Keeping them alive!!!
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, May 29, 2009, 7:42 PM








        Friends,

        I rarely post, but thought I'd pass along some stuff that's happening in our family. Last week, my son (35) called my wife (his mom) and asked if she'd spend a day with him to teach him how to make pirohy. She's always made her own, which she learned to make from my mom. We're both Slovak, but her mom bought them from the Uki church and my mom made them from scratch.

        The key to good pirohy is good dough, and they spent an entire day rolling dough and, when the day was done...the kid made pirohy worthy of any Slovak table. They did potato/cheese, cabbage and lekvar (which I always disliked). Important to keep the tradition alive. Yes, "Pierogies" are big in the supermarket, but nothing like the "Real Thing".

        Paul Wolsko

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michelle Burke
        That s great -- I used to help my mom make pierogies on Friday afternoons, but I never learned how to do it from her -- it s great that your son decided to
        Message 3 of 3 , May 29, 2009
          That's great -- I used to "help" my mom make pierogies on Friday afternoons, but I never learned how to do it from her -- it's great that your son decided to take advantage of her knowledge.


          ________________________________
          From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...>
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, May 29, 2009 7:42:16 PM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Food Traditions - Keeping them alive!!!





          Friends,

          I rarely post, but thought I'd pass along some stuff that's happening in our family. Last week, my son (35) called my wife (his mom) and asked if she'd spend a day with him to teach him how to make pirohy. She's always made her own, which she learned to make from my mom. We're both Slovak, but her mom bought them from the Uki church and my mom made them from scratch.

          The key to good pirohy is good dough, and they spent an entire day rolling dough and, when the day was done...the kid made pirohy worthy of any Slovak table. They did potato/cheese, cabbage and lekvar (which I always disliked). Important to keep the tradition alive. Yes, "Pierogies" are big in the supermarket, but nothing like the "Real Thing".

          Paul Wolsko

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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