Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [Slovak-World] Re: Needing help with today's saying

Expand Messages
  • Armata, Joseph R
    Funny, in that example, a singular verb seems normal to me. Maybe because the nouns are three separate examples of something that breaks, and the and could
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 23, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Funny, in that example, a singular verb seems normal to me. Maybe because the nouns are three separate examples of something that breaks, and the "and" could be replaced by "or": marble, stone, or iron breaks.

      Joe


      > Marmor, Stein und Eisen bricht
      > aber unsere Liebe nicht.
      >
      > "Marble, stone, and iron it-breaks, but our love not."
      >
      > It should be _brechen_, but in order to get a rhyme with _nicht_, this
      > is so OK that no one notices, just like in the Polish and Slovak
      > examples.
      >
      >
      > Martin
    • William C. Wormuth
      Ben, You already know how much respect I have for you and especially your command of the Slovak language. I completely understand your comment here as I often
      Message 2 of 21 , Apr 23, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Ben,
        You already know how much respect I have for you and especially your command of the Slovak language.
        I completely understand your comment here as I often have the same experience. At times, when I am surrounded by people who do not speak Slovak and I receive a call from Slovakia, or we are listening to Slovak music and someone asks a question, I will answer in Slovak. Yet, when I am thinking about a conversation I had in Slovakia, I remember it in English.

        However, I have been told that I speak Slovak, as though I am translating directly from English. If you do not understand this, I think Martin will.
        z Bohom,

        Vilo






        ________________________________
        From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 12:55:53 AM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying





        I appologize, and will do my best to translate all Slovak that I find/contribute. I just forget, sometimes, that I am speaking Slovak. With my wife and I speaking (almost) only Slovak, and Niki answering in English (or a mix), I just take English and Slovak as givens. I am sorry.
        To translate my post, we could say that "a guest and a fish both stink after three days."
        The "jednou nohou" quote is that he "is one foot in the grave, and yet still refuses to ask/ doesn't ask forgiveness. "

        Vladi brought up a good point- there are people teaching Slovak both here and in Slovakia. The University of Pittsburgh is the only university with a focus on Slovakia and Slovak culture resulting in a minor. Over the summer, Pitt has the SLI (Summer Language Institute) and throughout the year, one of our most revered SW members pretty much single-handedly promotes the study of Slovak in that minor- and in the United States. John Carrol University also has (had?) some Slovak courses. There are the ones mentioned by Vladi in Slovakia, as well as SAS (Studia Academia Slovaca) and others. Each of these options would provide a structured, as well as really fun, way to learn/hone/remember this beautiful language. I don't think you will really need hypnosis- just impetus and direction :-). It will come back, and no one is too old to learn a new language- I believe. :-).

        Ben




        --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Charlotte Conjelko <charr61pribish@ yahoo.com> wrote:

        From: Charlotte Conjelko <charr61pribish@ yahoo.com>
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
        Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 7:05 PM

        Hey, All You Fluent in Slovak,
        Have mercy on us who have forgotten most of the language that we learned long ago when we were young and so were our grandparents- -or perhaps never learned at all. How are we ever going to learn it and come to appreciate the wisdom of those adages if you keep confining it to those "in the know"?

        It would be ever so helpful if when you wrote your favorite quote, you immediately translated it for us. It is extremely frustrating to try to look up words in a dictionary and find that word is not in there either because translation dictionaries are limited to the more common words or it's a different case of another word that's listed. Or have to wait days for someone to eventually translate it for us.

        Interestingly, I had just mentioned to my husband earlier in the week about how helpful so many people were in aiding those looking for family connections or making financial transactions easier for those wishing to send money to Slovakia. And I really appreciate that since many of you have been helpful in my search.

        However, unless I undergo hypnosis, I'm never going to revive my knowlege of my grandparents' native tongue without your help.

        On behalf of myself and others in the same cln/lod', thank you for considering my request,
        Charlotte


        --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

        From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
        Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 10:11 AM

        There's that plural subject/singular verb thing again. Martin has explained it to me a number of times, and each time I think that I finally understand it...until the next time, when I don't.

        H

        >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 4/22/2009 8:00 AM >>>
        Funny that we should be talking about this at all... I was speaking to a friend and he used another version of this saying: je jednou nohou v hrobe, a este sa nekara...

        Speaking of sayings that "stink," Helen et al, here is one of my favorites:

        Host a ryba na treti den smrdi.
        :-)
        Ben

        --- On Tue, 4/21/09, Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@shaw. ca> wrote:

        From: Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@shaw. ca>
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
        Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 11:17 AM

        Not at all KARANIE you go to church asking for forgiveness.

        He smells of GRAVE and he isn't asking for forgiveness yet.

        Vladi

        At 08:13 AM 4/21/2009, you wrote:

        >- I guess you could take as saying that someone is remaining
        >reprehensible, in spite of being even close to death, as in they
        >refuse to admit guilt even when the act is close to becoming irredeemable.
        >
        >By the way, is karat and karhat the same?
        >Ben
        >--- On Tue, 4/21/09, Helen Fedor <<mailto:hfed% 40loc.gov>hfed@...> wrote:
        >
        >From: Helen Fedor <<mailto:hfed% 40loc.gov>hfed@...>
        >Subject: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
        >To: <mailto:Slovak- World%40yahoogro ups.com>Slovak- World@ yahoogroups. com
        >Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 10:01 AM
        >
        >"Hrobom smrdi' a es~te sa neka'ra"
        >
        >lit. (my attempt, at any rate): He/she smells of the grave and yet
        >doesn't reproach him/herself.
        >
        >H
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • William F Brna
        Vilo, I speak Slovak fluently and found that when I was in Slovakia, with no conscious effort on my part, I prayed in Slovak, even when no one was praying with
        Message 3 of 21 , Apr 23, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Vilo,

          I speak Slovak fluently and found that when I was in Slovakia, with no
          conscious effort on my part, I prayed in Slovak, even when no one was
          praying with me such as when I made the Sign of the Cross.

          William F. Brna

          On Thu, 23 Apr 2009 10:25:08 -0700 (PDT) "William C. Wormuth"
          <senzus@...> writes:



          Ben,
          You already know how much respect I have for you and especially your
          command of the Slovak language.
          I completely understand your comment here as I often have the same
          experience. At times, when I am surrounded by people who do not speak
          Slovak and I receive a call from Slovakia, or we are listening to Slovak
          music and someone asks a question, I will answer in Slovak. Yet, when I
          am thinking about a conversation I had in Slovakia, I remember it in
          English.

          However, I have been told that I speak Slovak, as though I am translating
          directly from English. If you do not understand this, I think Martin
          will.
          z Bohom,

          Vilo

          ________________________________
          From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, April 23, 2009 12:55:53 AM
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying

          I appologize, and will do my best to translate all Slovak that I
          find/contribute. I just forget, sometimes, that I am speaking Slovak.
          With my wife and I speaking (almost) only Slovak, and Niki answering in
          English (or a mix), I just take English and Slovak as givens. I am sorry.
          To translate my post, we could say that "a guest and a fish both stink
          after three days."
          The "jednou nohou" quote is that he "is one foot in the grave, and yet
          still refuses to ask/ doesn't ask forgiveness. "

          Vladi brought up a good point- there are people teaching Slovak both here
          and in Slovakia. The University of Pittsburgh is the only university with
          a focus on Slovakia and Slovak culture resulting in a minor. Over the
          summer, Pitt has the SLI (Summer Language Institute) and throughout the
          year, one of our most revered SW members pretty much single-handedly
          promotes the study of Slovak in that minor- and in the United States.
          John Carrol University also has (had?) some Slovak courses. There are the
          ones mentioned by Vladi in Slovakia, as well as SAS (Studia Academia
          Slovaca) and others. Each of these options would provide a structured, as
          well as really fun, way to learn/hone/remember this beautiful language. I
          don't think you will really need hypnosis- just impetus and direction
          :-). It will come back, and no one is too old to learn a new language- I
          believe. :-).

          Ben




          --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Charlotte Conjelko <charr61pribish@ yahoo.com>
          wrote:

          From: Charlotte Conjelko <charr61pribish@ yahoo.com>
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 7:05 PM

          Hey, All You Fluent in Slovak,
          Have mercy on us who have forgotten most of the language that we learned
          long ago when we were young and so were our grandparents- -or perhaps
          never learned at all. How are we ever going to learn it and come to
          appreciate the wisdom of those adages if you keep confining it to those
          "in the know"?

          It would be ever so helpful if when you wrote your favorite quote, you
          immediately translated it for us. It is extremely frustrating to try to
          look up words in a dictionary and find that word is not in there either
          because translation dictionaries are limited to the more common words or
          it's a different case of another word that's listed. Or have to wait days
          for someone to eventually translate it for us.

          Interestingly, I had just mentioned to my husband earlier in the week
          about how helpful so many people were in aiding those looking for family
          connections or making financial transactions easier for those wishing to
          send money to Slovakia. And I really appreciate that since many of you
          have been helpful in my search.

          However, unless I undergo hypnosis, I'm never going to revive my knowlege
          of my grandparents' native tongue without your help.

          On behalf of myself and others in the same cln/lod', thank you for
          considering my request,
          Charlotte


          --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

          From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 10:11 AM

          There's that plural subject/singular verb thing again. Martin has
          explained it to me a number of times, and each time I think that I
          finally understand it...until the next time, when I don't.

          H

          >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 4/22/2009 8:00 AM >>>
          Funny that we should be talking about this at all... I was speaking to a
          friend and he used another version of this saying: je jednou nohou v
          hrobe, a este sa nekara...

          Speaking of sayings that "stink," Helen et al, here is one of my
          favorites:

          Host a ryba na treti den smrdi.
          :-)
          Ben

          --- On Tue, 4/21/09, Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@shaw. ca> wrote:

          From: Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@shaw. ca>
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 11:17 AM

          Not at all KARANIE you go to church asking for forgiveness.

          He smells of GRAVE and he isn't asking for forgiveness yet.

          Vladi

          At 08:13 AM 4/21/2009, you wrote:

          >- I guess you could take as saying that someone is remaining
          >reprehensible, in spite of being even close to death, as in they
          >refuse to admit guilt even when the act is close to becoming
          irredeemable.
          >
          >By the way, is karat and karhat the same?
          >Ben
          >--- On Tue, 4/21/09, Helen Fedor <<mailto:hfed% 40loc.gov>hfed@...>
          wrote:
          >
          >From: Helen Fedor <<mailto:hfed% 40loc.gov>hfed@...>
          >Subject: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
          >To: <mailto:Slovak- World%40yahoogro ups.com>Slovak- World@ yahoogroups.
          com
          >Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 10:01 AM
          >
          >"Hrobom smrdi' a es~te sa neka'ra"
          >
          >lit. (my attempt, at any rate): He/she smells of the grave and yet
          >doesn't reproach him/herself.
          >
          >H
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ____________________________________________________________
          Get a life insurance quote online. Click to compare rates and save.
          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/BLSrjpTQcxJhsysvRmvbku6Bekia9bOSMMXK2tzSYeLKOtqUB3TuDPs7O96/

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Martin Votruba
          ... Indeed, human minds are driven to ascribe meaningful meaning to what they hear (language) no matter how unlikely it seems at first. The same applies to
          Message 4 of 21 , Apr 23, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            > in that example, a singular verb seems normal to me.

            Indeed, human minds are driven to ascribe "meaningful" meaning to what they hear (language) no matter how unlikely it seems at first. The same applies to Slovak minds in that pan-European saying: the guest and the fish are not a couple, a unit, each of them stinks on his/its own.

            Nevertheless, these (Slovak, Polish, German) instances would be unlikely to occur in everyday language.


            Martin
          • William C. Wormuth
            Martin, I thought you might enjoy this true story: When a young woman, here was a wallflower , (jumping from one man to another) she was referred to as miss
            Message 5 of 21 , Apr 24, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Martin,

              I thought you might enjoy this true story:
              When a young woman, here was a "wallflower", (jumping from one man to another) she was referred to as "miss whose manska" [huzmenska].

              Hev e najs vikend

              Vilko


              ________________________________




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Charlotte Conjelko
              Thanks, Ben, for considering the needs of we neophytes. Charlotte ... From: Ben Sorensen Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with
              Message 6 of 21 , Apr 25, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks, Ben, for considering the needs of we neophytes.
                Charlotte
                --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:

                From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 11:55 PM








                I appologize, and will do my best to translate all Slovak that I find/contribute.  I just forget, sometimes, that I am speaking Slovak. With my wife and I speaking (almost) only Slovak, and Niki answering in English (or a mix), I just take English and Slovak as givens.  I am sorry.
                To translate my post, we could say that "a guest and a fish both stink after three days."
                The "jednou nohou" quote is that he "is one foot in the grave, and yet still refuses to ask/ doesn't ask forgiveness. "
                 
                Vladi brought up a good point- there are people teaching Slovak both here and in Slovakia.  The University of Pittsburgh is the only university with a focus on Slovakia and Slovak culture resulting in a minor.  Over the summer, Pitt has the SLI (Summer Language Institute) and throughout the year, one of our most revered SW members pretty much single-handedly promotes the study of Slovak in that minor- and in the United States.   John Carrol University also has (had?) some Slovak courses.  There are the ones mentioned by Vladi in Slovakia, as well as SAS (Studia Academia Slovaca) and others.  Each of these options would provide a structured, as well as really fun, way to learn/hone/remember this beautiful language.  I don't think you will really need hypnosis- just impetus and direction :-).  It will come back, and no one is too old to learn a new language- I believe. :-).
                 
                Ben
                 
                 
                 

                --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Charlotte Conjelko <charr61pribish@ yahoo.com> wrote:

                From: Charlotte Conjelko <charr61pribish@ yahoo.com>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 7:05 PM

                Hey, All You Fluent in Slovak,
                Have mercy on us who have forgotten most of the language that we learned long ago when we were young and so were our grandparents- -or perhaps never learned at all.  How are we ever going to learn it and come to appreciate the wisdom of those adages if you keep confining it to those "in the know"?
                 
                It would be ever so helpful if when you wrote your favorite quote, you immediately translated it for us.  It is extremely frustrating to try to look up words in a dictionary and find that word is not in there either because translation dictionaries are limited to the more common words or it's a different case of another word that's listed.  Or have to wait days for someone to eventually translate it for us.
                 
                Interestingly, I had just mentioned to my husband earlier in the week about how helpful so many people were in aiding those looking for family connections or making financial transactions easier for those wishing to send money to Slovakia.  And I really appreciate that since many of you have been helpful in my search. 
                 
                However, unless I undergo hypnosis, I'm never going to revive my knowlege of my grandparents' native tongue without your help.
                 
                On behalf of myself and others in the same cln/lod', thank you for considering my request,
                Charlotte
                 

                --- On Wed, 4/22/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

                From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 10:11 AM

                There's that plural subject/singular verb thing again. Martin has explained it to me a number of times, and each time I think that I finally understand it...until the next time, when I don't.

                H

                >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 4/22/2009 8:00 AM >>>
                Funny that we should be talking about this at all... I was speaking to a friend and he used another version of this saying: je jednou nohou v hrobe, a este sa nekara...

                Speaking of sayings that "stink," Helen et al, here is one of my favorites:

                Host a ryba na treti den smrdi.
                :-)
                Ben

                --- On Tue, 4/21/09, Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@shaw. ca> wrote:

                From: Vladimir Linder <vlinder49@shaw. ca>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 11:17 AM

                Not at all KARANIE you go to church asking for forgiveness.

                He smells of GRAVE and he isn't asking for forgiveness yet.

                Vladi

                At 08:13 AM 4/21/2009, you wrote:

                >- I guess you could take as saying that someone is remaining
                >reprehensible, in spite of being even close to death, as in they
                >refuse to admit guilt even when the act is close to becoming irredeemable.
                >
                >By the way, is karat and karhat the same?
                >Ben
                >--- On Tue, 4/21/09, Helen Fedor <<mailto:hfed% 40loc.gov>hfed@...> wrote:
                >
                >From: Helen Fedor <<mailto:hfed% 40loc.gov>hfed@...>
                >Subject: [Slovak-World] Needing help with today's saying
                >To: <mailto:Slovak- World%40yahoogro ups.com>Slovak- World@ yahoogroups. com
                >Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 10:01 AM
                >
                >"Hrobom smrdi' a es~te sa neka'ra"
                >
                >lit. (my attempt, at any rate): He/she smells of the grave and yet
                >doesn't reproach him/herself.
                >
                >H
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Helen Fedor
                That s not how my dictionary defines a wallflower. H ... Martin, I thought you might enjoy this true story: When a young woman, here was a wallflower ,
                Message 7 of 21 , Apr 25, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  That's not how my dictionary defines a wallflower.

                  H



                  >>> "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@...> 04/24/09 10:51 PM >>>
                  Martin,

                  I thought you might enjoy this true story:
                  When a young woman, here was a "wallflower", (jumping from one man to another) she was referred to as "miss whose manska" [huzmenska].

                  Hev e najs vikend

                  Vilko


                  ________________________________




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • William C. Wormuth
                  The word is colloquial but I didn t want to use a more common, unkind term. Vilo ________________________________ From: Helen Fedor To:
                  Message 8 of 21 , Apr 25, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The word is colloquial but I didn't want to use a more common, unkind term.

                    Vilo




                    ________________________________
                    From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2009 7:27:13 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovaks adapting their new language in AMERICA





                    That's not how my dictionary defines a wallflower.

                    H

                    >>> "William C. Wormuth" <senzus@ymail. com> 04/24/09 10:51 PM >>>
                    Martin,

                    I thought you might enjoy this true story:
                    When a young woman, here was a "wallflower" , (jumping from one man to another) she was referred to as "miss whose manska" [huzmenska].

                    Hev e najs vikend

                    Vilko

                    ____________ _________ _________ __

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.