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RE: [Slovak-World] Folk Dress Mania

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  • Vladimir Linder
    Helene please do not FOOL us with the AGE stuff, I see you every year at the festivals in Slovakia and I thought you were 50is. Vladi
    Message 1 of 53 , Apr 4 10:15 AM
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      Helene please do not FOOL us with the AGE stuff, I see you every year
      at the festivals in Slovakia and I thought you were 50is.

      Vladi

      At 08:17 AM 4/4/2009, you wrote:

      >hi Joe - you say it so well!!!!! The old folk dress was made with
      >love! The modern ones are lovely but lack that certain something.
      >
      >I never heard the term "kroj mania" - it is perfect and it explains a lot .
      >
      >I have aprons from the 1880s - so simple with one narrow line of
      >embroidery and then by 1912 they are decorated almost to the waist,
      >by the 1950s to 1980s they are back to a small line of embroidery.
      >
      >What do we calll us nuts who are crazy for kroj - kroj maniacs????
      >How can it be so addictive? i guess part of the fascination is the
      >tremendous variety.
      >
      >helene
      >Kroj maniac since my great aunt dressed me up in her gorgeous kroj
      >when i was 13 - wow 58 years ago!
      >
      >--- On Fri, 4/3/09, Armata, Joseph R
      ><<mailto:armata%40pitt.edu>armata@...> wrote:
      >
      >From: Armata, Joseph R <<mailto:armata%40pitt.edu>armata@...>
      >Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Year of the Frog
      >To:
      >"<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com"
      > <<mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
      >Date: Friday, April 3, 2009, 4:48 PM
      >
      >The old elaborate costumes were made for love of family, and for
      >personal pride in how you present yourself to your village
      >community. Once you start making them for sale to strangers outside
      >the community, you'll never put in the same amount of labor, and
      >you'll cut corners and stylize things to simplify the process.
      >
      >A Hungarian book once pointed out that the elaborate folk costumes
      >we think of were really a fleeting thing. (The book called it a
      >"mania.") It lasted only 4 or 5 generations (late 1800s to mid
      >1900s). How lucky we are to be living in these times!
      >
      >Ben, Helene will name her single favorite costume when you name your
      >single favorite tune!
      >
      >Joe
      >
      > > Helene, you will be both glad and saddened to know that kroj makers are
      > > still out there, and probably will be for a while- but the whole
      > > situation has changed for the most part. You will be hard pressed to
      > > find real Ocovsky kroj, for example- but you probably can find a person
      > > who makes kroj according to most/all regions. It is no longer so well
      > > based in the villages. They really focus on the FS (folklorny subor)
      > > dance groups, and therefore everything becomes- sadly- more stylized
      > > according to region- and more homogenous at that. The kroj still
      > > are/probably will remain individual works of art, but you probably
      > > won't see the personalization (from the maker to the wearer) that was
      > > present before. Thankfully, musical instruments are still just as
      > > stylized as before, but it is NO SOLACE for people who appreciate the
      > > "signatures" of the kroj-makers of old.
      > >
      > > I love your kroj. As you say, picking a favorite is like picking a
      > > favorite child. I have the same opinion when it comes to my flutes.....
      > > Ben
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
    • Dorothy L Fitts
      This is the answer that I got from my niece on the word Well, paseker is certainly not a normal German word and not one either or I are familiar with.
      Message 53 of 53 , May 3, 2009
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        This is the answer that I got from my niece on the word



        "Well, "paseker" is certainly not a normal German word and not one either
        or I are familiar with.

        However, from what we can see on Google, "Paseky" is the name of a Czech
        town on the Czech/Polish border.

        The inhabitants are known as "Paseker", and the adjective for anything made
        in that town or held in that town is also "Paseker".

        For example they have a musical festival there and it is known as the
        "Paseker music festival" (here is a link to a site about the festival,
        unfortunately in German: http://www.radio.cz/de/artikel/31185/limit)

        Paseker can also be a last name. Probably originating from that town as
        well, I very much assume.



        I also think I just came across the same page you are looking at in Slovak
        World.

        From what I can see there, I tend to think that "Pasekers" mean that the
        people in question were from that town. It is definitely not an occupation,
        at least not in German.



        Hope that helps!"



        Dorothy



        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of helene cincebeaux
        Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 2:55 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] German words translated?








        Any German experts out there - this is from an Evangelical church document
        in 1866

        Grundbesitzer - homeowner?

        Eheweibes - wife?

        Paseker - could this be an occupation?

        un seiners Eheweibes???? Anna Wawra von Katerzinitz - could this be her
        full name, maiden name????

        Any help is welcome!

        thanks

        helene

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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