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Re: [Slovak-World] Radios in Czechoslovakia without tuners

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  • LongJohn Wayne
    Cover Your A.. It means to protect yourself.  Usually, doing something wrong, but with probable deniability.  Lawyers do a lot of CYA.  Doctors & engineers
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 20 7:59 PM
      Cover Your A..

      It means to protect yourself.  Usually, doing something wrong, but with probable deniability.  Lawyers do a lot of CYA.  Doctors & engineers do, too.  Usually, it costs the customer (client, patient) for the extra tests.  But in writing, it just means extra paragraphs, when a sentence will do.

      The Slovaks I know don't do much of it.  They tell you what they think.  If you agree, fine.  If you don't.  Fine, too.

      Chuck

      --- On Mon, 1/19/09, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:
      From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Radios in Czechoslovakia without tuners
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, January 19, 2009, 11:00 PM











      What is a CYA response? I am soooo out of the lingo- though it seems swell! I mean golly...  Holy incomprehenisble phrases, Batman....

      I am trying to figure out how one C's one's A here....

      Laskavy Prosim, 

      Ben



      --- On Mon, 1/19/09, Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com> wrote:



      From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com>

      Subject: [Slovak-World] Radios in Czechoslovakia without tuners

      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com

      Date: Monday, January 19, 2009, 12:11 PM



      > radios in Czechoslovakia without tuners?



      No interest to C anyone's A, I know you understand, Ron, just some

      historical background. A few hotels, hospitals, offices employ the

      remnants of a system put in by the Communists.



      Following Moscow's example, Prague began to introduce "cable radio"

      (rozhlas po dro^te, "radio by wire") in the 1950s. It transmitted a

      single station (channel) until its demise after the collapse of

      communism. It was the main national radio station that broadcast on

      regular radio waves too (only government-owned stations were allowed

      in much of democratic Europe too until about the 1970s-1980s) .



      The proclaimed idea for rozhlas po drote was to provide a reliable

      channel of information in case of emergency, but the Communists were

      surely thinking of eliminating people's capacity to listen to foreign

      broadcasts.



      Rozhlas po drote was routinely installed in offices, stores, and

      companies (the whole economy was owned by the Communist government),

      but some families subscribed to it too. Like with cable TV today,

      technicians would install special outlets for it. Subscriptions all

      but disappeared after the collapse of communism in 1989.



      Martin



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