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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?

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  • Ben Sorensen
    ... We can t all be perfect, my friend... :-) I knew what you meant! Ahh, a funny note. Many of my folklor friends want me to purchase a few copies of Zivot
    Message 1 of 33 , Jan 2, 2009
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      :-)
      We can't all be perfect, my friend... :-)
      I knew what you meant!
      Ahh, a funny note. Many of my folklor friends want me to purchase a few copies of "Zivot Franka Sakalskeho" to take back to Slovakia. :-D This is where my fear of the incongruencies begins... :-D
      But it answers one "question" that Helen brought up. She said she doesn't know how many Slovaks would understand the book, but this may be the answer. I am going to say 90% at least- from my limited survey. :-) (Janko Hrasko and friends.)  Even my Trencianka friend could read the first four pages with no problem-- and there is no reason why she should speak Saris.... Understand it, yes.... but her dialect is "insi," as Frank would say....
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:


      From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 2:31 PM






      > that blank post that automatically sent off

      And I took it to mean, Ben, that my:

      > si ot's highly unlikely
      >
      > was inserted by a subsequent editor who only of "style."

      ... could do with some editing too.

      Martin


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      paprikás [pahpree kah kahsh] csirke galuskaval [gha loosh kahvahl]. chicken paprikas~ s halus~ky, (with dumplings / spaetzle).
      Message 33 of 33 , Jan 22, 2009
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        paprikás [pahpree kah kahsh] csirke galuskaval [gha loosh kahvahl]. chicken paprikas~ s halus~ky, (with dumplings / spaetzle).


        ________________________________
        From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 9:37:30 AM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?


        < Csirke > (pronounced CHEER-keh) is the Hungarian word for chicken.

        H

        >>> Marianne Petruska <marianne50614@ gmail.com> 1/15/2009 12:08 PM >>>
        I know the name Mom had on a recipe card was something that ended like
        "sirke"? The "recipe card" was an old, fading index card & NOT written in
        Mom's handwriting -- it was a list of ingredients without no
        measurements. (I wish I knew what became of that card!)

        I think she just took that card out so to teach me to take out all the
        ingredients prior to starting to prepare the dish & I learned to make it
        by watching her cook it for her father. "Chicken" was on the list & she & I
        never varied how we prepared it. (Perhaps my grandfather didn't like
        veal!)

        We'd cook the chicken parts (usually drumsticks & thighs) in one big skillet
        & when those were cooked about half-way through, in another skillet we'd
        start sauteeing the chopped onions & minced garlic in bacon grease, adding
        to that sliced or chopped mushrooms & later stirring the "smetana" & paprika
        into it. (It was "Szeged" paprika -- I still remember the red can with the
        map on it! Whenever I find that paprika, I buy it!)

        While the sauce was cooking, water was boiling in 2 pots: One for the
        noodles & in a bottom of double boiler (the steamer-top half of which had
        the "pole beans" in it). I'm getting hungry just thinking about it!!

        On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 3:47 AM, <fbican@...> wrote:

        > I hope you'll forgive me for jumping in here, but by now you already
        > know I'm a "foodie".
        >
        > Papricacz is is generally a Hungarian/German food,
        >
        > VEAL PAPRIKASH
        > Printed from COOKS.COM <http://cooks. com/>
        >
        > 1 tbsp. butter
        > 1/2 c. diced onions
        > 1/2 lg. clove garlic minced
        > 1 tsp. milk paprika
        > 2 tbsp. tomato sauce
        > 2 tbsp. (heaping) sour cream
        > Spaetzle (recipe follows)
        > 2 lb. shoulder veal cut into 2 inch cubes
        > 2 lb. veal bones
        > 1 tbsp. flour
        > 4 c. chicken stock
        > 1/2 tsp. salt
        > In large heavy skillet heat butter, add onion, garlic and paprika - cook
        > until onion is soft. Add veal cubes and bones. Cook over low heat until meat
        > lets out juices. Sprinkle with flour until lightly browned when cooking. Add
        > stock (water can be used if stock not available) and salt. Bring mixture to
        > a boil, stirring frequently. Add tomato sauce, lower heat and simmer for 30
        > minutes or until meat is fork tender. Remove and discard bones. Turn off
        > heat and add sour cream slowly. Adjust seasoning if wanted. Makes 4 to 6
        > servings.
        > SPAETZLE (Small Dumplings) :
        > 1 c. flour
        > 1 egg
        > Melted butter
        > 1/2 c. water
        > Dash of salt
        > Place flour in bowl (medium), make well in center. Put egg, water and salt
        > into well; with work stir flour into liquid ingredients just until moistened
        > and soft dough is formed. Turn bowl so dough is at the edge. With knife cut
        > small portions of dough into large pot of boiling salted water. When
        > spaetzle rise to top, remove with slotted spoon and drain. Do this in 4
        > steps so as not to crowd spaetzle. When all cooked, rinse in lukewarm water
        > - drain and reheat in baking dish with desired amount of melted butter.
        > Serve with Veal Paprikash. Yields 4 to 6 servings.
        >
        > To make it wih anything but veal (i.e., chicken) is a sacriliage!
        >
        > Laskavy prosim,
        >
        > Skeeter
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message from LongJohn Wayne <
        > daxthewarrior@ yahoo.com <daxthewarrior% 40yahoo.com> >: ------------ --
        >
        > Marianne:
        >
        > Please describe Paprikash.
        >
        > Chuck
        >
        > --- On Sat, 1/3/09, Marianne Petruska <marianne50614@ gmail.com<marianne50614% 40gmail.com> >
        > wrote:
        > From: Marianne Petruska <marianne50614@ gmail.com<marianne50614% 40gmail.com>
        > >
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?
        > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com <Slovak-World% 40yahoogroups. com>
        > Date: Saturday, January 3, 2009, 8:08 PM
        >
        > I'l have to agree with Skeeter. I don't think the L.A. area has any
        >
        > Slovak/Czech restaurants but there are a few that claim to be Russian
        >
        > and German, along with a multitude of Chinese, Thai & Mexican restaurants &
        >
        > the ever-present Sushi bars & Olive Garden and Romano's Macaroni Grill
        >
        > locations.
        >
        > I've had Italian-American (home-cooked, courtesy of an ex-boyfriend' s
        >
        > mother) & agree re: Olive Garden *and *"Romano's Macaroni Grill" (Some
        >
        > former co-workers LOVED going there, claimed it as "better Italian food
        >
        > than Olive Garden". Oh, PLEASE!) The only thing I liked there was
        >
        > the "rustic bread" they served *before *the meal with olive oil & minced
        >
        > garlic. (And the non-food crayons with the Italian vegetable names for the
        >
        > colors, which I kept as collectors' items.)
        >
        > I'll skip the local Russian restaurants too -- a couple Russian co-workers
        > &
        >
        > I & some of our colleagues went to one near our office -- they had 3
        >
        > Hispanics as cooks & the food was terrible; neither of the Russians
        > finished
        >
        > her meal (thank goodness our company was picking up the tab because it was
        >
        > another co-worker's birthday). They've brought home-cooked foods to
        >
        > birthday "pot-luck" parties much better!!).
        >
        > As for Mexican food, my wonderful multi-ethnic generation of our family
        >
        > consists of Mexican-American in-laws, from whom one of my sisters learned
        > to
        >
        > cook Mexican dishes: Home-made is definitely better than restaurant food!
        >
        > (About the only Mexican restaurant she'll go to is El Torito -- and even
        >
        > then she compares the food to that of her sisters-in-law & mother-in-law! )
        >
        > My late mother made us Slovak & Ukrainian foods when we were kids . I miss
        >
        > the breads & rolls she'd make, especially the ones for Easter & the
        >
        > poppyseed loaves she made for the year-end holidays. (One of my 4
        >
        > sisters has started making those now.) Among the foods Mom taught me to
        >
        > make was Paprikash (Hungarian but among her my grandfather' s favorites) &
        > I
        >
        > still enjoy making that. And cabbage rolls & piroshki -- and NOT that
        >
        > frozen stuff at the market (yuck!). I'm getting hungry thinking about it!
        >
        > MARIANNE
        >
        > On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 5:58 PM, <fbican@... <fbican%40att. net>> wrote:
        >
        > > "worse than calling something produced in a restaurant "home" cooking".
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Martin, I have to strongly agree with you there. I learned to cook from
        > my
        >
        > > mom (Czech) and my grandmothers (Czech and Slovak). You can't get
        >
        > > home-cooking in any restaurant, particularly in the US. Too many chain
        >
        > > restaurants that cater to to the bland American tastes. First one that
        > comes
        >
        > > to mind is Olive Garden -- the poorest excuse for Italian food that I've
        >
        > > ever had, and I do like Italian, German, Slovak, Czech, Polish, German,
        >
        > > Russian, and many other cuisines, but if you want then done right, make
        > them
        >
        > > at home. Gulasz, forget it. Polevka, forget it. Telici rizky na houbrach?
        >
        > > Forget it. Knedlicky? I can get get some from a Polish store near here,
        > but
        >
        > > a restaurant? forget it. Brokev varena? I'll be growing my own varena in
        > my
        >
        > > greenhouse this summer. You'll never find it in a restaurant serving
        > varena.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > The terms "restaurant" and "home-cooked" are mutually-exclusive, at least
        >
        > > in the US. The best Mexican food I had was in a small mom-and-pop place
        > in
        >
        > > Puerto Vallarta. What passes for Mexican food around here pales in
        >
        > > comparison.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Yes, I'm a food critic-of-sorts, and rather say that I'm rather proud of
        >
        > > it. Maybe it takes a little (sometimes a lot) of work in the kitchen, but
        >
        > > it's worth the effort. I just can't believe what crap the American public
        >
        > > puts up with.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > [/end of rant]
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Laskavy prosim,
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Skeeter
        >
        > >
        >
        > > ------------ -- Original message from "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@yahoo. com<votrubam%40yahoo. com>>:
        >
        > > ------------ --
        >
        > >
        >
        > > > not take your comment as critical and
        >
        > > > meant mine purely as conversational.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > So let me pick up on and finish up my post that dwindled away towards
        >
        > > the end and be conversationally critical. I think _alpine_, and even
        >
        > > worse _Alpine_ (Reuters) is a bad word to use figuratively when it can
        >
        > > be taken in its literal meaning -- worse than calling something
        >
        > > produced in a restaurant "home" cooking, because people can figure out
        >
        > > that the second phrase is nonsense. Moreover, I suspect that the
        >
        > > editors were actually confusing Slovakia with Slovenia, which is
        >
        > > often, and rightly, described as an "Alpine country" in agency reports.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > As to the Alps, Carpathians, and strict geology, the Danube cut its
        >
        > > way through the Carpathians, not between them and the Alps. The
        >
        > > Carpathians spill south across the Danube here:
        >
        > >
        >
        > > <http://tinyurl. com/7eycdy>
        >
        > >
        >
        > > The hills just south of Hainburg and Wolfsthal are the
        >
        > > south-westernmost tip of the Carpathians. The Alps start (zoom out a
        >
        > > little) with the hills a few miles south-west of them, just west of
        >
        > > Neusiedler See.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Martin
        >
        > >
        >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >

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