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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?

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  • Ben Sorensen
    Just wired. I would like to recall that blank post that automatically sent off whilst reading Martin s post.... som uplne zmateny z toho. Why would an email
    Message 1 of 33 , Jan 2, 2009
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      Just wired.
      I would like to recall that blank post that automatically sent off whilst reading Martin's post....
      som uplne zmateny z toho. Why would an email just shoot off like that?
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:


      From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 2:09 PM








      --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 1:07 PM

      >> AP article in the paper this morning about Slovakia's adoption
      >> of the euro. To my surprise, the country was described as a
      >> "small alpine nation". [...] Granted, it didn't say "small
      >> Alpine nation" (upper case A)
      >
      > I would, however, call it mountainous

      My guess is that it's a result of "style" applied by copy editors at
      the agencies to raw reports from correspondents. A Reuters item from
      12/31 did the same, they even capitalized the A. The Rueters report
      was actually filed by their Slovak reporter, si ot's highly unlikely
      that he would have said "Alpine" rather than mountainous (although,
      e.g., the Slovak word _pleso_ is often translated with _Alpine lake_
      rather than with the more obscure _tarn_). The reporter either said
      "mountainous" or nothing, and his style was spruced up, or the whole
      sentence was inserted by a subsequent editor who only of "style."

      Martin

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William C. Wormuth
      paprikás [pahpree kah kahsh] csirke galuskaval [gha loosh kahvahl]. chicken paprikas~ s halus~ky, (with dumplings / spaetzle).
      Message 33 of 33 , Jan 22, 2009
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        paprikás [pahpree kah kahsh] csirke galuskaval [gha loosh kahvahl]. chicken paprikas~ s halus~ky, (with dumplings / spaetzle).


        ________________________________
        From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2009 9:37:30 AM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?


        < Csirke > (pronounced CHEER-keh) is the Hungarian word for chicken.

        H

        >>> Marianne Petruska <marianne50614@ gmail.com> 1/15/2009 12:08 PM >>>
        I know the name Mom had on a recipe card was something that ended like
        "sirke"? The "recipe card" was an old, fading index card & NOT written in
        Mom's handwriting -- it was a list of ingredients without no
        measurements. (I wish I knew what became of that card!)

        I think she just took that card out so to teach me to take out all the
        ingredients prior to starting to prepare the dish & I learned to make it
        by watching her cook it for her father. "Chicken" was on the list & she & I
        never varied how we prepared it. (Perhaps my grandfather didn't like
        veal!)

        We'd cook the chicken parts (usually drumsticks & thighs) in one big skillet
        & when those were cooked about half-way through, in another skillet we'd
        start sauteeing the chopped onions & minced garlic in bacon grease, adding
        to that sliced or chopped mushrooms & later stirring the "smetana" & paprika
        into it. (It was "Szeged" paprika -- I still remember the red can with the
        map on it! Whenever I find that paprika, I buy it!)

        While the sauce was cooking, water was boiling in 2 pots: One for the
        noodles & in a bottom of double boiler (the steamer-top half of which had
        the "pole beans" in it). I'm getting hungry just thinking about it!!

        On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 3:47 AM, <fbican@...> wrote:

        > I hope you'll forgive me for jumping in here, but by now you already
        > know I'm a "foodie".
        >
        > Papricacz is is generally a Hungarian/German food,
        >
        > VEAL PAPRIKASH
        > Printed from COOKS.COM <http://cooks. com/>
        >
        > 1 tbsp. butter
        > 1/2 c. diced onions
        > 1/2 lg. clove garlic minced
        > 1 tsp. milk paprika
        > 2 tbsp. tomato sauce
        > 2 tbsp. (heaping) sour cream
        > Spaetzle (recipe follows)
        > 2 lb. shoulder veal cut into 2 inch cubes
        > 2 lb. veal bones
        > 1 tbsp. flour
        > 4 c. chicken stock
        > 1/2 tsp. salt
        > In large heavy skillet heat butter, add onion, garlic and paprika - cook
        > until onion is soft. Add veal cubes and bones. Cook over low heat until meat
        > lets out juices. Sprinkle with flour until lightly browned when cooking. Add
        > stock (water can be used if stock not available) and salt. Bring mixture to
        > a boil, stirring frequently. Add tomato sauce, lower heat and simmer for 30
        > minutes or until meat is fork tender. Remove and discard bones. Turn off
        > heat and add sour cream slowly. Adjust seasoning if wanted. Makes 4 to 6
        > servings.
        > SPAETZLE (Small Dumplings) :
        > 1 c. flour
        > 1 egg
        > Melted butter
        > 1/2 c. water
        > Dash of salt
        > Place flour in bowl (medium), make well in center. Put egg, water and salt
        > into well; with work stir flour into liquid ingredients just until moistened
        > and soft dough is formed. Turn bowl so dough is at the edge. With knife cut
        > small portions of dough into large pot of boiling salted water. When
        > spaetzle rise to top, remove with slotted spoon and drain. Do this in 4
        > steps so as not to crowd spaetzle. When all cooked, rinse in lukewarm water
        > - drain and reheat in baking dish with desired amount of melted butter.
        > Serve with Veal Paprikash. Yields 4 to 6 servings.
        >
        > To make it wih anything but veal (i.e., chicken) is a sacriliage!
        >
        > Laskavy prosim,
        >
        > Skeeter
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message from LongJohn Wayne <
        > daxthewarrior@ yahoo.com <daxthewarrior% 40yahoo.com> >: ------------ --
        >
        > Marianne:
        >
        > Please describe Paprikash.
        >
        > Chuck
        >
        > --- On Sat, 1/3/09, Marianne Petruska <marianne50614@ gmail.com<marianne50614% 40gmail.com> >
        > wrote:
        > From: Marianne Petruska <marianne50614@ gmail.com<marianne50614% 40gmail.com>
        > >
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: an interesting description; comments?
        > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com <Slovak-World% 40yahoogroups. com>
        > Date: Saturday, January 3, 2009, 8:08 PM
        >
        > I'l have to agree with Skeeter. I don't think the L.A. area has any
        >
        > Slovak/Czech restaurants but there are a few that claim to be Russian
        >
        > and German, along with a multitude of Chinese, Thai & Mexican restaurants &
        >
        > the ever-present Sushi bars & Olive Garden and Romano's Macaroni Grill
        >
        > locations.
        >
        > I've had Italian-American (home-cooked, courtesy of an ex-boyfriend' s
        >
        > mother) & agree re: Olive Garden *and *"Romano's Macaroni Grill" (Some
        >
        > former co-workers LOVED going there, claimed it as "better Italian food
        >
        > than Olive Garden". Oh, PLEASE!) The only thing I liked there was
        >
        > the "rustic bread" they served *before *the meal with olive oil & minced
        >
        > garlic. (And the non-food crayons with the Italian vegetable names for the
        >
        > colors, which I kept as collectors' items.)
        >
        > I'll skip the local Russian restaurants too -- a couple Russian co-workers
        > &
        >
        > I & some of our colleagues went to one near our office -- they had 3
        >
        > Hispanics as cooks & the food was terrible; neither of the Russians
        > finished
        >
        > her meal (thank goodness our company was picking up the tab because it was
        >
        > another co-worker's birthday). They've brought home-cooked foods to
        >
        > birthday "pot-luck" parties much better!!).
        >
        > As for Mexican food, my wonderful multi-ethnic generation of our family
        >
        > consists of Mexican-American in-laws, from whom one of my sisters learned
        > to
        >
        > cook Mexican dishes: Home-made is definitely better than restaurant food!
        >
        > (About the only Mexican restaurant she'll go to is El Torito -- and even
        >
        > then she compares the food to that of her sisters-in-law & mother-in-law! )
        >
        > My late mother made us Slovak & Ukrainian foods when we were kids . I miss
        >
        > the breads & rolls she'd make, especially the ones for Easter & the
        >
        > poppyseed loaves she made for the year-end holidays. (One of my 4
        >
        > sisters has started making those now.) Among the foods Mom taught me to
        >
        > make was Paprikash (Hungarian but among her my grandfather' s favorites) &
        > I
        >
        > still enjoy making that. And cabbage rolls & piroshki -- and NOT that
        >
        > frozen stuff at the market (yuck!). I'm getting hungry thinking about it!
        >
        > MARIANNE
        >
        > On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 5:58 PM, <fbican@... <fbican%40att. net>> wrote:
        >
        > > "worse than calling something produced in a restaurant "home" cooking".
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Martin, I have to strongly agree with you there. I learned to cook from
        > my
        >
        > > mom (Czech) and my grandmothers (Czech and Slovak). You can't get
        >
        > > home-cooking in any restaurant, particularly in the US. Too many chain
        >
        > > restaurants that cater to to the bland American tastes. First one that
        > comes
        >
        > > to mind is Olive Garden -- the poorest excuse for Italian food that I've
        >
        > > ever had, and I do like Italian, German, Slovak, Czech, Polish, German,
        >
        > > Russian, and many other cuisines, but if you want then done right, make
        > them
        >
        > > at home. Gulasz, forget it. Polevka, forget it. Telici rizky na houbrach?
        >
        > > Forget it. Knedlicky? I can get get some from a Polish store near here,
        > but
        >
        > > a restaurant? forget it. Brokev varena? I'll be growing my own varena in
        > my
        >
        > > greenhouse this summer. You'll never find it in a restaurant serving
        > varena.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > The terms "restaurant" and "home-cooked" are mutually-exclusive, at least
        >
        > > in the US. The best Mexican food I had was in a small mom-and-pop place
        > in
        >
        > > Puerto Vallarta. What passes for Mexican food around here pales in
        >
        > > comparison.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Yes, I'm a food critic-of-sorts, and rather say that I'm rather proud of
        >
        > > it. Maybe it takes a little (sometimes a lot) of work in the kitchen, but
        >
        > > it's worth the effort. I just can't believe what crap the American public
        >
        > > puts up with.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > [/end of rant]
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Laskavy prosim,
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Skeeter
        >
        > >
        >
        > > ------------ -- Original message from "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@yahoo. com<votrubam%40yahoo. com>>:
        >
        > > ------------ --
        >
        > >
        >
        > > > not take your comment as critical and
        >
        > > > meant mine purely as conversational.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > So let me pick up on and finish up my post that dwindled away towards
        >
        > > the end and be conversationally critical. I think _alpine_, and even
        >
        > > worse _Alpine_ (Reuters) is a bad word to use figuratively when it can
        >
        > > be taken in its literal meaning -- worse than calling something
        >
        > > produced in a restaurant "home" cooking, because people can figure out
        >
        > > that the second phrase is nonsense. Moreover, I suspect that the
        >
        > > editors were actually confusing Slovakia with Slovenia, which is
        >
        > > often, and rightly, described as an "Alpine country" in agency reports.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > As to the Alps, Carpathians, and strict geology, the Danube cut its
        >
        > > way through the Carpathians, not between them and the Alps. The
        >
        > > Carpathians spill south across the Danube here:
        >
        > >
        >
        > > <http://tinyurl. com/7eycdy>
        >
        > >
        >
        > > The hills just south of Hainburg and Wolfsthal are the
        >
        > > south-westernmost tip of the Carpathians. The Alps start (zoom out a
        >
        > > little) with the hills a few miles south-west of them, just west of
        >
        > > Neusiedler See.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > Martin
        >
        > >
        >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >

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