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vocab question & case question

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  • Julie Michutka
    Can you use the word pribuzny/-a as a general word for relative when referring to an individual, eg she is my relative, je pribuzna; or, I have a relative who
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 29, 2008
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      Can you use the word pribuzny/-a as a general word for relative when
      referring to an individual, eg she is my relative, je pribuzna; or, I
      have a relative who ..., mam pribuznu ktora ... ? Or is there
      another word that is either more correct or more common?

      Harking back to the recent discussion on case use ... someone
      offering me a cup of coffee the other day made me wonder: So when
      someone holds up the coffee pot and raises their eyebrows in query and
      asks "coffee?" (short for "would you like coffee?"), in Slovak, would
      you use the one word like that, and would it be in the accusative even
      tho' a word all by itself, because it is the direct object of an
      unspoken but implied verb: "kavu?"

      Thanks. Silly, the stuff that rattles around in my head some days!

      Julie Michutka
      jmm@...
    • Ben Sorensen
      Hi Julie, I am going to take a stab at this-- pribuzna/-ny is just fine, the only other alternative is to use words like  cousin (for male, bratranec/female
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 29, 2008
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        Hi Julie,
        I am going to take a stab at this-- pribuzna/-ny is just fine, the only other alternative is to use words like  cousin (for male, bratranec/female sesternica) or other members of the family.  The cases you used are correct- Mam pribuznu, ktora... Just and FYI
         
        Also, the coffee would be in accusative- do you want coffee? (direct object.) Coffee? (implied direct object)
        Kavu??? :-)
         
        Ben :-)


        --- On Mon, 12/29/08, Julie Michutka <jmm@...> wrote:


        From: Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
        Subject: [Slovak-World] vocab question & case question
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, December 29, 2008, 9:20 PM






        Can you use the word pribuzny/-a as a general word for relative when
        referring to an individual, eg she is my relative, je pribuzna; or, I
        have a relative who ..., mam pribuznu ktora ... ? Or is there
        another word that is either more correct or more common?

        Harking back to the recent discussion on case use ... someone
        offering me a cup of coffee the other day made me wonder: So when
        someone holds up the coffee pot and raises their eyebrows in query and
        asks "coffee?" (short for "would you like coffee?"), in Slovak, would
        you use the one word like that, and would it be in the accusative even
        tho' a word all by itself, because it is the direct object of an
        unspoken but implied verb: "kavu?"

        Thanks. Silly, the stuff that rattles around in my head some days!

        Julie Michutka
        jmm@pathbridge. net

















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Martin Votruba
        ... A good example of the issue. That s also why the relatively fixed phrases go: _Dobru chut._, _Stastnu cestu._, _Dobru noc._ I.e., it is also the
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 29, 2008
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          >> holds up the coffee pot and raises their eyebrows in query
          >> and asks "coffee?" (short for "would you like coffee?")
          >
          > the coffee would be in accusative- do you want coffee?
          > (direct object.) Coffee? (implied direct object) Kavu???

          A good example of the issue. That's also why the relatively fixed
          phrases go: _Dobru chut._, _Stastnu cestu._, _Dobru noc._ I.e., it is
          also the accusative in, e.g., _Pekny vylet._, _Vesele Vianoce._,
          _Dobry den._, we just can't see that, and that misleads people into
          using the nominative in instances when the N and A differ.
          |

          To expand the examples, the nominative _Kava?_ would probably be
          uncommon, but if it occurred at all, it would not mean what's expected
          in the English description. It would be read as, e.g., "Coffee?
          This??" -- "Toto ze je kava??", "Tomuto tu hovoria kava??", "Toto ma
          byt kava??", etc.
          |

          Martin
        • Ben Sorensen
          Martin, I am racking (or wracking??? maybe just wrecking) my brain, but can t seem to get it/find it. What is the difference between o hodinu and za
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 29, 2008
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            Martin,
            I am racking (or wracking??? maybe just wrecking) my brain, but can't seem to get it/find it. What is the difference between "o hodinu" and "za hodinu?"
             
            Ben

            --- On Tue, 12/30/08, Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:


            From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: vocab question & case question
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, December 30, 2008, 12:38 AM






            >> holds up the coffee pot and raises their eyebrows in query
            >> and asks "coffee?" (short for "would you like coffee?")
            >
            > the coffee would be in accusative- do you want coffee?
            > (direct object.) Coffee? (implied direct object) Kavu???

            A good example of the issue. That's also why the relatively fixed
            phrases go: _Dobru chut._, _Stastnu cestu._, _Dobru noc._ I.e., it is
            also the accusative in, e.g., _Pekny vylet._, _Vesele Vianoce._,
            _Dobry den._, we just can't see that, and that misleads people into
            using the nominative in instances when the N and A differ.
            |

            To expand the examples, the nominative _Kava?_ would probably be
            uncommon, but if it occurred at all, it would not mean what's expected
            in the English description. It would be read as, e.g., "Coffee?
            This??" -- "Toto ze je kava??", "Tomuto tu hovoria kava??", "Toto ma
            byt kava??", etc.
            |

            Martin


















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Martin Votruba
            ... What the language minders want, Ben, but only some Slovaks distinguish naturally is: o hodinu = after an hour passes za hodinu = for the duration of an
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 29, 2008
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              > the difference between "o hodinu" and "za hodinu?"

              What the language minders want, Ben, but only some Slovaks distinguish
              naturally is:

              o hodinu = "after an hour passes"
              za hodinu = "for the duration of an hour"

              There are few contexts when a mere switch between o and za could make
              a difference:

              Urobim to o hodinu. "Not now, I'll do it 60 minutes from now."
              Pridem tam o hodinu. "I'll be there 60 minutes from now."

              Urobim to za hodinu. "It'll take me 60 minutes to do do it."
              Pridem tam za hodinu. "It'll take me 60 minutes to get there."

              But broader context makes it normally clear which meaning is intended.
              In most instances, though, there is no potential for two readings at all:

              Poviem im to za hodinu. "I'll tell them 60 minutes from now." --
              There's 0.1 percent chance that anyone could understand this as "I'll
              be telling them about this for 60 minutes." The perfective _povedat_
              effectively prevents that in this example. People would use the
              imperfective _Budem im to hovorit hodinu._ (neither za, nor o) to get
              that meaning. Etc.

              Most people use only za all the time, and there's no confusion.


              Martin
            • William F Brna
              When I was in Slovakia, I was always asked, Chces kavu? . I do not recall only the word, kavu being used. William F. Brna On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 21:20:56
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 30, 2008
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                When I was in Slovakia, I was always asked, "Chces kavu?". I do not
                recall only the word, "kavu" being used.

                William F. Brna

                On Mon, 29 Dec 2008 21:20:56 -0500 Julie Michutka <jmm@...>
                writes:
                Can you use the word pribuzny/-a as a general word for relative when
                referring to an individual, eg she is my relative, je pribuzna; or, I
                have a relative who ..., mam pribuznu ktora ... ? Or is there
                another word that is either more correct or more common?

                Harking back to the recent discussion on case use ... someone
                offering me a cup of coffee the other day made me wonder: So when
                someone holds up the coffee pot and raises their eyebrows in query and
                asks "coffee?" (short for "would you like coffee?"), in Slovak, would
                you use the one word like that, and would it be in the accusative even
                tho' a word all by itself, because it is the direct object of an
                unspoken but implied verb: "kavu?"

                Thanks. Silly, the stuff that rattles around in my head some days!

                Julie Michutka
                jmm@...


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