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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco

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  • Gergely
    Our daughter taught us (she s lived in Germany for 20 years now) that non-carbonated water is referred to as still water. It seems to work well. ... From:
    Message 1 of 56 , Dec 16, 2008
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      Our daughter taught us (she's lived in Germany for 20 years now) that non-carbonated water is referred to as "still" water. It seems to work well.




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Mader, Michelle A. (GRC-CHC0)
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 3:14 PM
      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco


      I believe what Maxine said was that she wanted non-carbonated
      (non-mineral) water and when she found what she thought was a bottle of
      non-carbonated water it turned out to be Vodka.

      Maxine, we ran into the water problem in Germany. To get non-carbonated
      water you had to ask for tap water.

      Michelle Maco Mader
      Cleveland, Ohio USA

      ________________________________

      From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lil Junas
      Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 3:10 PM
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco



      Maxine: I'm not an expert on this, but I've never known vodka to
      have
      bubbles. What you no doubt drank was mineral water which does
      usually come
      in a tall bottle (mainly green) -- and is the popular drink
      there.
      Lil

      On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 2:47 PM, maxine <maxine96@...
      <mailto:maxine96%40cox.net> > wrote:

      > Hi Ben, I do not get that at all???? Slovak's do not drink too
      much??? When
      > I was there 2 years ago, that had vodka for breakfast, lunch,
      dinner and in
      > between! I never drank so much in my life. Now I am NOT
      condemning them
      > for it, I just think it is a custom. I remember one morning I
      wanted a
      > glass of water so bad, but NOT the kind that had bubbles in
      it, and I could
      > not find some. So I saw someone drinking from a big bottle so
      I thought it
      > was the regular water and went over to ask for some. Well,
      guess what, it
      > was Vodka, no wonder everyone had a smile on their face
      watching me because
      > I took a very big drink of it and almost chocked to death.
      However, I still
      > LOVE THEM ALL! maxine
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Ben Sorensen
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 11:36 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
      >
      >
      > I too have found it curious how often I hear of American kids
      turning 21
      > and dying of alcohol poisoning. In Slovakia, I didn't hear of
      it even once.
      > I won't say that there are fewer alcoholics in Slovakia per
      capita...
      > because I just don't know. :-) It would surprise me if there
      was a higher
      > percentage of alcoholism in Slovakia vis a vis the United
      States, though.
      > Just a thought....
      > Ben
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: John Polko <johnpolko@...
      <mailto:johnpolko%40rogers.com> >
      > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 11:33:15 PM
      > Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
      >
      > Hello,
      >
      > Its curious that liqour was given to me and my siblings, and
      non of us
      > turnded of any addictive products as adults. We genurally got
      a small
      > amount of wine, liqeur, wiskey mixes etc. It was family that
      kept us from
      > going overboard with alcohol by giving us small amounts. Thats
      not to say
      > that I didn't go on an occasional bender, but I always swore
      off alcohol
      > until the next six or so months later. Now, I don't drink
      except for an
      > occasional beer, or a glass of wine, but I generally find that
      I don't
      > especially like liquor of any kind.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > John e. Polko.
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak-World@
      yahoogroups.
      > com]On
      > Behalf Of fbican@... <mailto:fbican%40att.net>
      > Sent: December 2, 2008 10:52 PM
      > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
      >
      > Indeed, some of the old world remedies are the best. Nothing
      was as good
      > as my mom's kura polevka when I got a cold. Vick's Vapo-rub
      was good, too
      > (also stinky). Not to mention some teply caj v citron, med,
      whisky. You'd
      > get in big trouble serving whisky to a child today, but no one
      thought a
      > thing about it in the '50s. Heck, I started drinking pivo with
      my velky
      > otec
      > when I was four. That was just "normal" in a Bohemian
      household back then.
      >
      > Laskavy prosim,
      >
      > Skeeter
      >
      > ------------ -- Original message from Nick Holcz
      > <nickh@iinet. net.au>: ------------ --
      >
      > At 09:43 AM 3/12/2008, you wrote:
      >
      > >Yes, turpentine also popped into my mind. It is good for
      toughening
      > >up skin or blisters when there is need to keep working. A
      quick
      > >google search reveals "turpentine oil" and its various
      medicinal uses.
      >
      > Some of the old world remedies are still very good. My father
      used
      > kerosine as an antiseptic and from memory it worked well.
      >
      > Nick
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --
      "To be nobody but myself."
      www.ljunas.com

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Gergely
      Our daughter taught us (she s lived in Germany for 20 years now) that non-carbonated water is referred to as still water. It seems to work well. ... From:
      Message 56 of 56 , Dec 16, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Our daughter taught us (she's lived in Germany for 20 years now) that non-carbonated water is referred to as "still" water. It seems to work well.




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Mader, Michelle A. (GRC-CHC0)
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 3:14 PM
        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco


        I believe what Maxine said was that she wanted non-carbonated
        (non-mineral) water and when she found what she thought was a bottle of
        non-carbonated water it turned out to be Vodka.

        Maxine, we ran into the water problem in Germany. To get non-carbonated
        water you had to ask for tap water.

        Michelle Maco Mader
        Cleveland, Ohio USA

        ________________________________

        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lil Junas
        Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 3:10 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco



        Maxine: I'm not an expert on this, but I've never known vodka to
        have
        bubbles. What you no doubt drank was mineral water which does
        usually come
        in a tall bottle (mainly green) -- and is the popular drink
        there.
        Lil

        On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 2:47 PM, maxine <maxine96@...
        <mailto:maxine96%40cox.net> > wrote:

        > Hi Ben, I do not get that at all???? Slovak's do not drink too
        much??? When
        > I was there 2 years ago, that had vodka for breakfast, lunch,
        dinner and in
        > between! I never drank so much in my life. Now I am NOT
        condemning them
        > for it, I just think it is a custom. I remember one morning I
        wanted a
        > glass of water so bad, but NOT the kind that had bubbles in
        it, and I could
        > not find some. So I saw someone drinking from a big bottle so
        I thought it
        > was the regular water and went over to ask for some. Well,
        guess what, it
        > was Vodka, no wonder everyone had a smile on their face
        watching me because
        > I took a very big drink of it and almost chocked to death.
        However, I still
        > LOVE THEM ALL! maxine
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Ben Sorensen
        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 11:36 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
        >
        >
        > I too have found it curious how often I hear of American kids
        turning 21
        > and dying of alcohol poisoning. In Slovakia, I didn't hear of
        it even once.
        > I won't say that there are fewer alcoholics in Slovakia per
        capita...
        > because I just don't know. :-) It would surprise me if there
        was a higher
        > percentage of alcoholism in Slovakia vis a vis the United
        States, though.
        > Just a thought....
        > Ben
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: John Polko <johnpolko@...
        <mailto:johnpolko%40rogers.com> >
        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 11:33:15 PM
        > Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > Its curious that liqour was given to me and my siblings, and
        non of us
        > turnded of any addictive products as adults. We genurally got
        a small
        > amount of wine, liqeur, wiskey mixes etc. It was family that
        kept us from
        > going overboard with alcohol by giving us small amounts. Thats
        not to say
        > that I didn't go on an occasional bender, but I always swore
        off alcohol
        > until the next six or so months later. Now, I don't drink
        except for an
        > occasional beer, or a glass of wine, but I generally find that
        I don't
        > especially like liquor of any kind.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > John e. Polko.
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak-World@
        yahoogroups.
        > com]On
        > Behalf Of fbican@... <mailto:fbican%40att.net>
        > Sent: December 2, 2008 10:52 PM
        > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
        >
        > Indeed, some of the old world remedies are the best. Nothing
        was as good
        > as my mom's kura polevka when I got a cold. Vick's Vapo-rub
        was good, too
        > (also stinky). Not to mention some teply caj v citron, med,
        whisky. You'd
        > get in big trouble serving whisky to a child today, but no one
        thought a
        > thing about it in the '50s. Heck, I started drinking pivo with
        my velky
        > otec
        > when I was four. That was just "normal" in a Bohemian
        household back then.
        >
        > Laskavy prosim,
        >
        > Skeeter
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message from Nick Holcz
        > <nickh@iinet. net.au>: ------------ --
        >
        > At 09:43 AM 3/12/2008, you wrote:
        >
        > >Yes, turpentine also popped into my mind. It is good for
        toughening
        > >up skin or blisters when there is need to keep working. A
        quick
        > >google search reveals "turpentine oil" and its various
        medicinal uses.
        >
        > Some of the old world remedies are still very good. My father
        used
        > kerosine as an antiseptic and from memory it worked well.
        >
        > Nick
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        "To be nobody but myself."
        www.ljunas.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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