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FRANK: San Francisco

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  • Helen Fedor
    Frank traveled to San Francisco on the ship for 2 days and 2 nights, and was sick as a dog. He described SF as being as big as Pes~t (of Budapest fame).
    Message 1 of 56 , Dec 2, 2008
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      Frank traveled to San Francisco on the ship for 2 days and 2 nights, and was sick as a dog. He described SF as being as big as Pes~t (of Budapest fame). There he found Poles and Czech and Slovak families. He was there for about 2 weeks before coming back to Portland. He was so sick on the way back that he was yellow when he landed.

      His 2nd child, little Pauline, was born February 28, 1897, and they had the doctor in again. Frank had to pay him $30. The serving woman who helped his wife for 2 weeks was paid $10, and the pharmacy costs were $7.80. "You see, $50 down the water all at once!" [Would it be too strong (and wrong) to translate <dolu vodu> as the modern-day "down the toilet"?]

      When Frank came back from SF, he got 2 "stinging" <ohnive> scabs on his right leg, below the knee, so he went to the doctor, who gave him powders to mix with water and drink, and some ointment. [I wonder if he considered this money to be <dolu vodu> as well.] It took 8 months for the 2 wounds to heal. It was only after he remembered that when he was about 9 years old, he had a hole in his right leg below the knee and his mother scraped some fluff from a linen sheet and applied some wood oil to the wound <mi matka zos lenej plachti nas~krabala mohu a drevenu olivu mi prikladala> that it healed. [Can anyone explain the "wood oil"?] Remembering this treatment got Frank do the same thing and he cured his wounds. Later on, however, he started getting a rash on his shoulders, lower back, and sometimes on his forehead, but the rash on his forehead disappeared quickly.

      On July 28, 1897, he started working nights in a casino. The building had a big tavern. There were a lot of rooms on the 2nd floor and all kinds of gambling was done for big money. In the evenings, all kinds of rich men <panove>, storekeepers, and craftsmen came. The more people who came, the more Frank earned. He served all kinds of liquors, working by the hour. When he worked more hours, he earned more. His pay increased from month to month.

      H
    • Gergely
      Our daughter taught us (she s lived in Germany for 20 years now) that non-carbonated water is referred to as still water. It seems to work well. ... From:
      Message 56 of 56 , Dec 16, 2008
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        Our daughter taught us (she's lived in Germany for 20 years now) that non-carbonated water is referred to as "still" water. It seems to work well.




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Mader, Michelle A. (GRC-CHC0)
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 3:14 PM
        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco


        I believe what Maxine said was that she wanted non-carbonated
        (non-mineral) water and when she found what she thought was a bottle of
        non-carbonated water it turned out to be Vodka.

        Maxine, we ran into the water problem in Germany. To get non-carbonated
        water you had to ask for tap water.

        Michelle Maco Mader
        Cleveland, Ohio USA

        ________________________________

        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lil Junas
        Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 3:10 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco



        Maxine: I'm not an expert on this, but I've never known vodka to
        have
        bubbles. What you no doubt drank was mineral water which does
        usually come
        in a tall bottle (mainly green) -- and is the popular drink
        there.
        Lil

        On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 2:47 PM, maxine <maxine96@...
        <mailto:maxine96%40cox.net> > wrote:

        > Hi Ben, I do not get that at all???? Slovak's do not drink too
        much??? When
        > I was there 2 years ago, that had vodka for breakfast, lunch,
        dinner and in
        > between! I never drank so much in my life. Now I am NOT
        condemning them
        > for it, I just think it is a custom. I remember one morning I
        wanted a
        > glass of water so bad, but NOT the kind that had bubbles in
        it, and I could
        > not find some. So I saw someone drinking from a big bottle so
        I thought it
        > was the regular water and went over to ask for some. Well,
        guess what, it
        > was Vodka, no wonder everyone had a smile on their face
        watching me because
        > I took a very big drink of it and almost chocked to death.
        However, I still
        > LOVE THEM ALL! maxine
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Ben Sorensen
        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 11:36 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
        >
        >
        > I too have found it curious how often I hear of American kids
        turning 21
        > and dying of alcohol poisoning. In Slovakia, I didn't hear of
        it even once.
        > I won't say that there are fewer alcoholics in Slovakia per
        capita...
        > because I just don't know. :-) It would surprise me if there
        was a higher
        > percentage of alcoholism in Slovakia vis a vis the United
        States, though.
        > Just a thought....
        > Ben
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: John Polko <johnpolko@...
        <mailto:johnpolko%40rogers.com> >
        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2008 11:33:15 PM
        > Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > Its curious that liqour was given to me and my siblings, and
        non of us
        > turnded of any addictive products as adults. We genurally got
        a small
        > amount of wine, liqeur, wiskey mixes etc. It was family that
        kept us from
        > going overboard with alcohol by giving us small amounts. Thats
        not to say
        > that I didn't go on an occasional bender, but I always swore
        off alcohol
        > until the next six or so months later. Now, I don't drink
        except for an
        > occasional beer, or a glass of wine, but I generally find that
        I don't
        > especially like liquor of any kind.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > John e. Polko.
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak-World@
        yahoogroups.
        > com]On
        > Behalf Of fbican@... <mailto:fbican%40att.net>
        > Sent: December 2, 2008 10:52 PM
        > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: FRANK: San Francisco
        >
        > Indeed, some of the old world remedies are the best. Nothing
        was as good
        > as my mom's kura polevka when I got a cold. Vick's Vapo-rub
        was good, too
        > (also stinky). Not to mention some teply caj v citron, med,
        whisky. You'd
        > get in big trouble serving whisky to a child today, but no one
        thought a
        > thing about it in the '50s. Heck, I started drinking pivo with
        my velky
        > otec
        > when I was four. That was just "normal" in a Bohemian
        household back then.
        >
        > Laskavy prosim,
        >
        > Skeeter
        >
        > ------------ -- Original message from Nick Holcz
        > <nickh@iinet. net.au>: ------------ --
        >
        > At 09:43 AM 3/12/2008, you wrote:
        >
        > >Yes, turpentine also popped into my mind. It is good for
        toughening
        > >up skin or blisters when there is need to keep working. A
        quick
        > >google search reveals "turpentine oil" and its various
        medicinal uses.
        >
        > Some of the old world remedies are still very good. My father
        used
        > kerosine as an antiseptic and from memory it worked well.
        >
        > Nick
        >
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        >
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        >
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        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        "To be nobody but myself."
        www.ljunas.com

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