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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland

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  • Cathie McAdams
    The bryndza that I bought Saturday was in a roll.  We had some yesterday for company on sesame crackers with some chives (green onions were a horrible
    Message 1 of 25 , Dec 1, 2008
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      The bryndza that I bought Saturday was in a roll.  We had some yesterday for company on sesame crackers with some chives (green onions were a horrible price and the chives were still growing in a flower box on our deck).  Since I do not know any receipes for bryndza, that is the best I could do.
       




      ________________________________
      From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, December 1, 2008 12:14:18 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland


      > It sounds like you are getting two types of mixes here

      I'd agree. Perhaps even more.

      As to Polish bryndza, BJLK (glad to see you're still on SK-W), if it's
      marked as made in Poland and labeled _Podhale_ or _Podhalanska_
      bryndza, that would be good. That standard actually pushes it
      somewhat closer to traditional bryndza than what's coming out of
      Slovakia. Here's a paragraph about the European standardization of
      bryndza, and another one about how it is in the US:

      <http://www.pitt edu/~votruba/ qsonhist/ bryndza.html>

      ... in the middle column.

      > I will probably decline any

      I agree, Ben, it's quite difficult to know in the absence of
      regulations. French fries, Swiss cheese, Hawaiian pizza, Home
      cooking... none of that comes from where it says, nor is there any
      rule that something labeled "Slovak" or "Polish" needs to be imported
      from those countries.

      And even when there is regulation.. . An agency tested salmon in a
      number of reputable delis and restaurants in New York a couple of
      years ago. Only about two(!) were really selling the fancy, expensive
      salmon from where all of them claimed theirs had come while all were
      charging the high price, of course.

      Martin






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paw1776
      If you are referring to the Bryndza sold by Gilmart...I can vouch that I use it all the time to make Brydnzove Halushky....at least whenever I get to Chicago
      Message 2 of 25 , Dec 1, 2008
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        If you are referring to the Bryndza sold by Gilmart...I can vouch that I use it all the time to make Brydnzove Halushky....at least whenever I get to Chicago to stock up. I can't vouch that it is authentic...but I think the taste is similar to that which you would find in Slovakia...at least that is what I have been told.

        Here is what I found when I googled "where can I buy bryndza":

        "I am the owner of Slovak-Czech Variety store in NY and we recently started to import and sell bryndza and other cheeses from Slovakia. Our address: Slovak-Czech Varieties, 10-59 Jackson Ave., Long Island City, NY 11101. Tel.: 718-752-2093, E-mail: info@..., www.slovczechvar.com."

        It is currently selling for $13.75 for 500 grams. I did purchase some this spring and it was quite good.

        Polly Russinik Walker


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • fbican@att.net
        I know what you mean about the cost of zeleny cibula and chives. The last time I bought them, they were both terribly expensive. I sowed some chive seeds
        Message 3 of 25 , Dec 1, 2008
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          I know what you mean about the cost of zeleny cibula and chives. The last time I bought them, they were both terribly expensive. I sowed some chive seeds that I had into some potting soil in one of my little terrariums, and have my finger crossed they come up.

          As for syr, I love it, and I'm pretty open-minded about what I'll try. I had some applewood-smoked cheddar for breakfast. The best syr I've found comes from Wisconsin, Vermont, and Holland. I'm looking forward to serving the gouda with basil (Dutch) and cotswald with onions (England) on crackers or raz chlieb during the holidays. I fail to see how that could possibly be bad.

          As an aside, I knew a gent whose favorite snack was a sandwich made with limburger cheese and onions. His wife would make him eat it sitting on a lawn chair in the back yard.

          I've got 6 different varieties of syr in the fridge at the moment. I guess that makes me a certifiable "cheese head"!

          Laskavy prosim,

          Skeeter

          -------------- Original message from Cathie McAdams <ab8gv@...>: --------------

          The bryndza that I bought Saturday was in a roll. We had some yesterday for company on sesame crackers with some chives (green onions were a horrible price and the chives were still growing in a flower box on our deck). Since I do not know any receipes for bryndza, that is the best I could do.


          ________________________________
          From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, December 1, 2008 12:14:18 AM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland

          > It sounds like you are getting two types of mixes here

          I'd agree. Perhaps even more.

          As to Polish bryndza, BJLK (glad to see you're still on SK-W), if it's
          marked as made in Poland and labeled _Podhale_ or _Podhalanska_
          bryndza, that would be good. That standard actually pushes it
          somewhat closer to traditional bryndza than what's coming out of
          Slovakia. Here's a paragraph about the European standardization of
          bryndza, and another one about how it is in the US:

          <http://www.pitt edu/~votruba/ qsonhist/ bryndza.html>

          ... in the middle column.

          > I will probably decline any

          I agree, Ben, it's quite difficult to know in the absence of
          regulations. French fries, Swiss cheese, Hawaiian pizza, Home
          cooking... none of that comes from where it says, nor is there any
          rule that something labeled "Slovak" or "Polish" needs to be imported
          from those countries.

          And even when there is regulation.. . An agency tested salmon in a
          number of reputable delis and restaurants in New York a couple of
          years ago. Only about two(!) were really selling the fancy, expensive
          salmon from where all of them claimed theirs had come while all were
          charging the high price, of course.

          Martin

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ben Sorensen
          Hello BJLK- You can use it for bryndzove halusky most likely... and I will be right over. What is your address? :-) I have yet to get bryndza here but I have
          Message 4 of 25 , Dec 1, 2008
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            Hello BJLK-
            You can use it for bryndzove halusky most likely... and I will be right over. What is your address? :-)

            I have yet to get bryndza here but I have the same contact in NY as someone else referenced. I know that thier supplier is actually Hungarian and in NY, and he told me that he imports it from the Liptov/Podpolanie area. I hope it is true... and I may have to break down and get some....
            Ben




            ________________________________
            From: "BJLK@..." <BJLK@...>
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2008 11:04:05 PM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland


            I've been following this thread of thought carefully because I have been
            able to buy bryndza in the Chicago area for quite a while. However, I'm not too
            sure about its provenance, because it doesn't seem to be quite the same each
            time I find it. Sometimes it is rather mild and resembles cream cheese, and
            other times it is more sharp and a little more dry, but still of spreading
            consistency. It is apparently repacked from a bulk package into small plastic
            tubs that weigh about a half pound, more or less. The cost was $5.49 per
            pound the last time I bought some.

            I have a few questions:

            Because my source is a Polish importer, am I buying a Polish-style bryndza?

            Can I use this bryndza when I make bryndzove halusky? (I just came across
            an old recipe that I would love to try during the Christmas season).

            Any information or comments would be appreciated.

            ____________ _________ ____
            B. J. Licko-Keel (_BJLK@..._ (mailto:BJLK@...) )

            ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
            ------------ -


            In a message dated 11/30/2008 8:40:18 A.M. Central Standard Time,
            votrubam@yahoo. com writes:

            > that bryndza is back- There is
            > no bryndza like Slovak bryndza

            It's not clear where this product has originated. A substitute made
            of cow cheese and feta, processed and seasoned to resemble bryndza, is
            sold in a limited number of places in the US. A former major Slovak
            exporter to the US said in the summer that they were stopping export
            to the US (which is not to say that they indeed did). They probably
            used to supply all the Slovak bryndza that was commercially available
            here.

            Martin

            ------------ --------- --------- ------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            ************ **Finally, one site has it all: your friends, your email, your
            favorite sites. Try the NEW AOL.com.
            (http://www.aol com/?optin= new-dp&icid= aolcom40vanity& ncid=emlcntaolco m00000006)

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • William C. Wormuth
            is the name Buta toth Bryndza? ________________________________ From: Ben Sorensen To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday,
            Message 5 of 25 , Dec 1, 2008
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              is the name "Buta toth" Bryndza?




              ________________________________
              From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2008 11:30:20 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland


              Hey there,
              I have found a Hungarian that imports Slovak bryndza- and I bet it is hard to be sure that a Pole is or isn't importing Slovak bryndza.  I think people who know Slovenska (majova) bryndza would have to try it and give you their opinion... and I am always looking for an excuse to eat bryndza.  However, Martin's words have lead me to the idea that I will probably decline any American bryndza. Feta is not even close....

              It sounds like you are getting two types of mixes here, one more "cut" than the other, and the roll is leading me to think Slovak bryndza.  I am HOPING, as I live on bryndza when I can find it. I have since lost a staple of my diet- bryndza and zincica. What is a fujaras to do???? Slivovica is just not a substitute.. . :-D
              Martin and other Slovaks, please chime in and give me hope....
              Ben

              ____________ _________ _________ __
              From: "BJLK@..." <BJLK@...>
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Sunday, November 30, 2008 11:04:05 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland

              I've been following this thread of thought carefully because I have been
              able to buy bryndza in the Chicago area for quite a while. However, I'm not too
              sure about its provenance, because it doesn't seem to be quite the same each
              time I find it. Sometimes it is rather mild and resembles cream cheese, and
              other times it is more sharp and a little more dry, but still of spreading
              consistency. It is apparently repacked from a bulk package into small plastic
              tubs that weigh about a half pound, more or less. The cost was $5.49 per
              pound the last time I bought some.

              I have a few questions:

              Because my source is a Polish importer, am I buying a Polish-style bryndza?

              Can I use this bryndza when I make bryndzove halusky? (I just came across
              an old recipe that I would love to try during the Christmas season).

              Any information or comments would be appreciated.

              ____________ _________ ____
              B. J. Licko-Keel (_BJLK@..._ (mailto:BJLK@...) )

              ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
              ------------ -

              In a message dated 11/30/2008 8:40:18 A.M. Central Standard Time,
              votrubam@yahoo. com writes:

              > that bryndza is back- There is
              > no bryndza like Slovak bryndza

              It's not clear where this product has originated. A substitute made
              of cow cheese and feta, processed and seasoned to resemble bryndza, is
              sold in a limited number of places in the US. A former major Slovak
              exporter to the US said in the summer that they were stopping export
              to the US (which is not to say that they indeed did). They probably
              used to supply all the Slovak bryndza that was commercially available
              here.

              Martin

              ------------ --------- --------- ------

              Yahoo! Groups Links

              ************ **Finally, one site has it all: your friends, your email, your
              favorite sites. Try the NEW AOL.com.
              (http://www.aol com/?optin= new-dp&icid= aolcom40vanity& ncid=emlcntaolco m00000006)

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • William C. Wormuth
              Actually, if there is none available, the mix with feta is not bad.  Don t be afraid to try the Ukrainian deli selections.  In Albany, NY they had three
              Message 6 of 25 , Dec 1, 2008
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                Actually, if there is none available, the mix with feta is not bad.
                 Don't be afraid to try the Ukrainian deli selections.  In Albany, NY they had three brands:  Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Romanian.  I selected Bulgarian because it was closest in odor to ours.
                Since there are different "brands" from  different areas in Slovakia, each of us would have a different special choice.
                It cost $3.75 a pound but was worth it.  I bought fro myself and two friends, both Krajani.  THEY WERE SUPER HAPPY, as was I.  Thus, I understand all of these messages in the thread.

                Hope you all find a source!
                Vilo



                ________________________________
                From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, December 1, 2008 12:14:18 AM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Bryndza in Cleveland


                > It sounds like you are getting two types of mixes here

                I'd agree. Perhaps even more.

                As to Polish bryndza, BJLK (glad to see you're still on SK-W), if it's
                marked as made in Poland and labeled _Podhale_ or _Podhalanska_
                bryndza, that would be good. That standard actually pushes it
                somewhat closer to traditional bryndza than what's coming out of
                Slovakia. Here's a paragraph about the European standardization of
                bryndza, and another one about how it is in the US:

                <http://www.pitt edu/~votruba/ qsonhist/ bryndza.html>

                ... in the middle column.

                > I will probably decline any

                I agree, Ben, it's quite difficult to know in the absence of
                regulations. French fries, Swiss cheese, Hawaiian pizza, Home
                cooking... none of that comes from where it says, nor is there any
                rule that something labeled "Slovak" or "Polish" needs to be imported
                from those countries.

                And even when there is regulation... . An agency tested salmon in a
                number of reputable delis and restaurants in New York a couple of
                years ago. Only about two(!) were really selling the fancy, expensive
                salmon from where all of them claimed theirs had come while all were
                charging the high price, of course.

                Martin






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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