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FRANK: The Indian family

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  • Helen Fedor
    Frank woke up at 5:30 because something was making a roaring noise near his head. He punched George and George woke up immediately. When they looked up, they
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 31, 2008
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      Frank woke up at 5:30 because something was making a roaring noise near his head. He punched George and George woke up immediately. When they looked up, they saw an Indian who was spreading out some hay in front of the horses for them to eat. "You see, what a good person that Indian was. Even though he was wild, he was good, because while we were sleeping, the wild people could have come and killed us and taken all that we had, but he didn't do that because they were friendly Indians."

      The Indian told the fellows that it was 48 miles to the nearest town and some 25 miles to the nearest white farmers. The fellows said that they were very hungry and asked if they could buy something to eat from the Indian. He knew very little English and showed them the number of miles by using his fingers, but he understood pretty well.

      The Indian wanted the fellows to come to his house. They were afraid, but they were so hungry and it was so far to the nearest white farmer, what could they do? There were other tents around, but this Indian was a pretty good farmer because he had a wagon, a plow, <? brani>, and cows.

      He told his wife to fix the fellows something to eat, so she sliced some smoked venison and smoked fish, milked the cow, and brewed some coffee. While his wife was cooking, the fellows talked with the Indian outside, praising his farm. He told them that he had 20 cows and 150 horses. Later, when his 17- or 18-year-old daughter went to feed the hogs, "she looked at [Frank] boldly, as if she liked [him]."

      Frank asked the Indian if he had a son to help him with the work, but the Indian only had 2 daughters. The Indian's wife called them into the tent <s~ater>, where the food was ready. Neither the wife nor either daughter knew a single word of English. The Indians spoke in their own language, and George and Frank spoke in both English and in Slovak. The Indians thought that English and Slovak sounded funny, and the fellows thought that the Indian's language sounded funny, and they laughed at each other.

      After the meal, George asked the Indian how much they owed. The Indian had seen George use his pocket knife to cut tobacco for his pipe and asked for the knife in payment. The Indian also asked if they had whiskey, but Frank said that they didn't drink.

      When they were saddled up and were passing by the Indian's cottage <chalupa>, the daughter came out and waved to the fellows with a white handkerchief; Frank waved back with his hat. George laughed and said they should go back because she obviously liked Frank, because he'd been a soldier in Pres~ov. The fellows were pretty far away and she still waved the handkerchief, but didn't know a word of English.

      The fellows were well-fed and in a good mood, so they kidded each other along the way. They decided that the old Indian had a very good farm for 150 horses and cows, and had two daughters. The prettier one would be for Frank and the uglier one would be for George. George said he didn't want the uglier one, that Frank should take her himself, etc.

      H
    • Claudia Medvik
      I d like to offer another small sidebar of color, if I may. If this was Oregon territory the Indian might have been Mandan. They were a very friendly tribe
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 2, 2008
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        I'd like to offer another small sidebar of color, if I may. If this was Oregon
        territory the Indian might have been Mandan. They were a very friendly
        tribe and actually helped Lewis and Clark's party make it thru one winter
        at the end of their punishing journey to the Pacific. They lived in what
        we would call lodges, homes of flat boards built into igloo shaped homes,
        and as portable as any teepee (buffalo not being in this area).

        That they were offered smoke fish (salmon) and vension indicates they
        were more than likely nomadic And also because horses and cattle have
        to be moved to new pasture regularly, they probably we on a planned
        route of migration when they met up with Frank and George. It was a
        very lucky day for them to be there at the right time to get the food
        they needed. Frank didn't mention crops and I doubt if there is a Slovak
        word for ranch, so its possible this was one of many 'stations' along
        their yearly route.

        That the girl was interested was to be expected, as Native Americans
        of that era, men married into a family, not like daughters leaving home for
        their husbands' as it was in Europe. Frank and George were obviously
        very fine looking fellows if the girls and their father considered them
        for husbands. If George was calvary back home, he'd have a very
        good 'seat' on a horse, something that was very impressive to the
        native peoples. And it would have been quite an easy life had they
        settled there, as women did everything with home and food. All a man
        had to do was bring in the occasional deer, the women did the butchering
        and preserving. With an indian wife they never would have gone hungry!

        Full of useless historic facts, and grateful to share them.

        Claudia



        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.comFrom: hfed@...: Fri, 31 Oct 2008 15:00:52 -0400Subject: [Slovak-World] FRANK: The Indian family




        Frank woke up at 5:30 because something was making a roaring noise near his head. He punched George and George woke up immediately. When they looked up, they saw an Indian who was spreading out some hay in front of the horses for them to eat. "You see, what a good person that Indian was. Even though he was wild, he was good, because while we were sleeping, the wild people could have come and killed us and taken all that we had, but he didn't do that because they were friendly Indians."The Indian told the fellows that it was 48 miles to the nearest town and some 25 miles to the nearest white farmers. The fellows said that they were very hungry and asked if they could buy something to eat from the Indian. He knew very little English and showed them the number of miles by using his fingers, but he understood pretty well.The Indian wanted the fellows to come to his house. They were afraid, but they were so hungry and it was so far to the nearest white farmer, what could they do? There were other tents around, but this Indian was a pretty good farmer because he had a wagon, a plow, <? brani>, and cows. He told his wife to fix the fellows something to eat, so she sliced some smoked venison and smoked fish, milked the cow, and brewed some coffee. While his wife was cooking, the fellows talked with the Indian outside, praising his farm. He told them that he had 20 cows and 150 horses. Later, when his 17- or 18-year-old daughter went to feed the hogs, "she looked at [Frank] boldly, as if she liked [him]."Frank asked the Indian if he had a son to help him with the work, but the Indian only had 2 daughters. The Indian's wife called them into the tent <s~ater>, where the food was ready. Neither the wife nor either daughter knew a single word of English. The Indians spoke in their own language, and George and Frank spoke in both English and in Slovak. The Indians thought that English and Slovak sounded funny, and the fellows thought that the Indian's language sounded funny, and they laughed at each other.After the meal, George asked the Indian how much they owed. The Indian had seen George use his pocket knife to cut tobacco for his pipe and asked for the knife in payment. The Indian also asked if they had whiskey, but Frank said that they didn't drink.When they were saddled up and were passing by the Indian's cottage <chalupa>, the daughter came out and waved to the fellows with a white handkerchief; Frank waved back with his hat. George laughed and said they should go back because she obviously liked Frank, because he'd been a soldier in Pres~ov. The fellows were pretty far away and she still waved the handkerchief, but didn't know a word of English.The fellows were well-fed and in a good mood, so they kidded each other along the way. They decided that the old Indian had a very good farm for 150 horses and cows, and had two daughters. The prettier one would be for Frank and the uglier one would be for George. George said he didn't want the uglier one, that Frank should take her himself, etc.H





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