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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west

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  • Helen Fedor
    The only do ... phrase I remember hearing is do frasa , which wasn t so bad. Oh, wait, the next step up was do ancias~a . These sound positively quaint
    Message 1 of 35 , Oct 4, 2008
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      The only "do ..." phrase I remember hearing is "do frasa", which wasn't so bad. Oh, wait, the next step up was "do ancias~a". These sound positively quaint nowadays.

      I think I know what "do ...i" is, but not "do ...e". Maybe it's best that I don't. It's helpful to know how to swear in another language so that you don't offend folks around you when you just HAVE to get it out of your system, but I'm afraid that I'll let fly during one of our Slovak events some day. Then I'd be plenty red in the face.

      H




      >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> 10/03/08 4:49 PM >>>
      Hey Helen,
      did your dad say do ...i or do....e?
      :-D
      it is vzor ulica. :-D and it was Saris in your house, right?
      kidding, dear.
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

      From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 4:11 PM






      My dad used to use a swear word (when he got VERY mad) that, to me, meant nothing--it was just a nonsense word as far as I was concerned, but that made my mom see purple. She'd tell him to knock it off because I (who was just a squirt at the time) was around. It wasn't until I was in my 30s and read _Schweik_ that I learned what it meant. (Hint: it was the Big One.)

      H

      >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 10/3/2008 3:58 PM >>>
      maybe it is Slovak. :-P I just looked it up in some Slovak dictionary sites, and it was there... so all this time I thought it was a Czech word- and now I find that perhaps not. :-)
      No, co uz?
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 3:55 PM

      isn't it?
      Hmmm.. I am so used to using it, I wonder what the real Slovak equivalent is....
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

      From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 3:50 PM

      "Sakra" is a Czech word?

      H

      >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 10/3/2008 3:27 PM >>>
      Martin, would it be safe to think of television being a deciding factor in this question? I can see Slovak being a second language for them, and having much TV in Czech, that this could lead to thier using Czech terms. Many Slovaks do too- sakra, hele, atd... but this is not really interference per se. I wouldn't know, but I would expect that to happen in Roma communities.

      Ben

      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, helene cincebeaux <helenezx@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: helene cincebeaux <helenezx@yahoo. com>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 3:20 PM

      This discussion prompts an observation and a question. In visiting Rom familes in northeastern Slovakia I noticed they spoke with some Czech. Is this due to ltheir having to learn Slovak as a second language or possibly to Czech teachers decades ago???? or Czech textbooks when it was Czechoslovakia? can anyone provide enlightenment?

      helene

      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 1:14 PM

      So, would the V-F change be because of Czech influences in West Slovak? Or is there a deeper answer?
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 10/3/08, Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com> wrote:

      From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Frank goes west
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, October 3, 2008, 12:26 PM

      > why the "uf in "zlatufka"

      I'll split it in two: A) [u]; and B) [v].

      A) This [u] from a narrowed long [o'] does occur in places in East
      Slovak (in West SK, too, and in Czech -- stul, dum, for "table,"
      "house"), but as Helen says:

      > we would have said "zlatofka" or "zlatouka"

      ... it is not widespread and not always consistent. It is typical of
      north-eastern Spis, for instance (and I don't mean the Goral dialects
      there).

      > seemed to me that the eastern dialects picked up some Polish

      What would be the grounds to assume that things were "picked up from"
      when there are two possibilities -- either "picked up from" or
      parallel development? Polish linguists determined decades ago that
      there was parallel development in varieties of East Slovak and Polish,
      not borrowing, which is limited to a few lexical items.

      B) The [v]--[w] alternation is quite common in East Slovak (Central
      Spis tends to have [v]--[f], it occurs in other places, too).
      [v]--[f] is common especially in West Slovak.

      |
      Martin

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    • Martin Votruba
      ... I agree, Ron, they do (from an etymological perspective, few Slovaks would think of them that way casually). What I wondered about was the source of
      Message 35 of 35 , Oct 4, 2008
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        > the idea that Eastern Slovak and Czech had a closer resemblance
        > than Central Slovak.

        I agree, Ron, they do (from an etymological perspective, few Slovaks
        would think of them that way casually). What I wondered about was the
        source of information that some argued during the negotiations in the
        1840s (or possibly at another time) that, therefore, Eastern Slovak
        should become Standard Slovak.


        Martin
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