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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Paul Newman to a wierd q. for the group

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  • fbican@att.net
    how long did it take you/them to learn English? I can only speak of my recollections of my grandparents. They immigrated to the US in the late 1800 s, and
    Message 1 of 51 , Sep 30, 2008
      "how long did it take you/them to learn English? "

      I can only speak of my recollections of my grandparents. They immigrated to the US in the late 1800's, and quickly learned English. They had to to get an education or decent job. My grandfathers pretty much abandoned the "old country" language, but my grandmothers remained polylingual, and could speak English, Slovak, Czech, and Polish. I wish I had that talent. Now, I have to satisfy myself with my little electronic translator.

      http://www.amazon.com/Lingo-TR-2900-Global-Language-Translator/dp/B000AI2TU6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1222778939&sr=8-1

      It's not perfect, but it gets me in the ballpark most of the time, particularly when I visit a site like in Greece, about which language I know nothing about. I can't recommend the Lingo translator highly enough. It's a wonderful tool. 29 languages, 580000 words, financial conversions, international time, calculator, phone book... Best 50 bucks I've ever spent.

      Kindest regards,

      Skeeter

      -------------- Original message from Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>: --------------



      Hello everyone,

      I was just going through the Paul Newman genealogy posted and reread Martin's original post (I feel like a Philogist, looking for the original post.. :-P)

      However, should

      > she have _first_ immigrated in 1921, her English would probably have

      > been non-existent and remained rather poor for a while,

      I do NOT dispute this very educated assumption- it bears all reasoning. My question is for everyone, and very mundane, if you will...

      For all of you who have family in Slovakia (all of us???) or are Slovaks who immigrated here, or had Slovak family come and visit, how long did it take you/them to learn English? what was the learning process like for YOU/THEM? (Yep, I am after the subjective here...) Did you/thery find English harder or easier than Slovak? I know what my own students thought/felt, but they were studying in Slovakia. If I could get them a summer job (na brigadu) in England, they came back with a very different feeling about English, and all but forgot what it was like to be more or less monolingual. But, I am sure that we all have funny stories...

      I would also like to pose the same questions to those of us who learned Slovak....
      Ben

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    • Plichta
      Jack, Thanks Jack. You must have lived across town. We listened to KDKA when I lived in Pittsburgh from 1941 to 1946, I was too young at the time to know
      Message 51 of 51 , Sep 30, 2008
        Jack,

        Thanks Jack.

        You must have lived across town. We listened to KDKA when I lived in
        Pittsburgh from 1941 to 1946,

        I was too young at the time to know about KQV.

        Frank



        _____

        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Gergely
        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 4:32 PM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Paul Newman to a wierd q. for the group



        Yep,
        KDKA was the first, KQV the second commercial stations. All other east of
        the Mississippi start with a W.
        Jack Gergely
        KQV listener from the late 50s
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: William F Brna
        To: Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 2:33 PM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Paul Newman to a wierd q. for the group

        Not so, Frank. There is also KQV in Pittsburgh.

        Bill Brna

        On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 14:01:56 -0400 "Plichta" <plichta@earthlink.
        <mailto:plichta%40earthlink.net> net>
        writes:
        The first radio station in America was KDKA in Pittsburgh, PA that first
        came on the air on November 2, 1920.

        KDKA is the only radio station east of the Mississippi River that has a
        call
        sign beginning with a "K". All other radio stations with a call sign
        starting with a "K" are west of the Mississippi River. All eastern
        stations
        call signs begin with the letter "W".

        Enjoy Trivia

        Frank Plichta

        "Searching the world for PLICHTAs"

        _____

        From: Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com>
        yahoogroups.com]
        On
        Behalf Of Caye Caswick
        Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2008 12:54 PM
        To: Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Paul Newman to a wierd q. for the group

        Martin and Ben:

        My grandmother came over in 1921 -- mom said gram perfected her English
        via
        radio (seems as if most internet sites say that broadcast radio was
        around
        beginning in the early 1920's) -- and learned to read with the newspaper,
        probably once my own mother could help her do so -- mom was born in 1927.
        Gram married in 1925 -- and I highly doubt the old cabinet radio I
        remember
        them owning was something gram bought before she got married, probably
        not
        until after they had been married a while, so I'm betting she was here
        almost 10 years before her English was any good on the street.

        Caye

        --- On Tue, 9/30/08, Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo.
        <mailto:votrubam%40yahoo.com> com> wrote:

        From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. <mailto:votrubam%40yahoo.com> com>
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Paul Newman to a wierd q. for the group
        To: Slovak-World@ <mailto:Slovak-World%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 9:45 AM

        > my own students thought/felt, but they were studying in Slovakia.

        Not a contribution to your query, Ben, just a comment on how the
        immigrants learned English around the turn of the 19th and 20th
        centuries. They arrived without ever having heard English (hard to
        imagine today). There's a world of difference in the quality of
        foreign language acquisition between having even a year of language
        training and nothing, or merely physiological exposure to the language
        through music, subtitled films, and some TV programming at a younger
        age. Once they were in the US, it depended greatly on age: whether
        they got to go to school here plus the universal physiological turning
        point for languages that is the age of 12-14. If people arrived
        before the age of 12-14 and went to school, they mostly became fluent
        native speakers of English. Things began to go more slowly with no
        schooling and the later after that age the immigrant arrived.

        Another factor was gender, which translated to employment. Women were
        more likely to take care of the family or run boarding houses (often
        both), i.e., to have remained within the immigrant community all day
        long, and those learned less. There was no radio, TV then, so their
        exposure to English was minimal (again, hard to imagine today). Most
        men spent up to 12 hours a day at work, so they got some "interactive
        training" there, although it was sometimes in poor English, because
        they mostly spoke to other immigrants at work.

        Some Slovak (and other) industrial immigrant communities (whether
        people lived in them was another factor in language acquisition)
        remained so large and "stationary" that a segment of their women began
        to be proficient in English with the advent of TV.

        Martin

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