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RE: [Slovak-World] Re: Postcard

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  • Armata, Joseph R
    Interesting, and thanks! How would you read the first two lines of the postcard? We ve all had trouble making firm sense out of it. And one other thing - in
    Message 1 of 54 , Sep 25, 2008
      Interesting, and thanks! How would you read the first two lines of the postcard? We've all had trouble making firm sense out of it.

      And one other thing - in the short part at the top written vertically, the writer wrote "pisit" several times, which I figured had to intend the imperative (Write!), though the form looks like it really is "he/she writes". A few words farther on, there's what I recognize as a real imperative ("piszte nam" - Write us), then farther on "piszali" (past participle form). Any thoughts on that? Was the writer just getting tired, or are these all good grammatical imperative forms in the dialect?

      Joe


      > On "Minyi":
      > Yes, almost; it's the 1st person singular dative ("to me"). In Rusyn it
      > would normally be spelled "meni" but in this particular Lowlander
      > dialect of Rusyn, the vowel "e" in that position goes to a "y" sound
      > (rhymes with i in "fit", same y as in the word Rusyn), and the "yi" as
      > others noted is the Hungarian orthography's representation of a
      > palatized n before the i. You might also transliterate it from Cyrillic
      > as mynji. Other examples of this in the Lowlander Rusyn dialects are
      > dyn' (for den', day), dnys' (for dnes', today), typyr' (for teper',
      > now), pysatyl' (for pysatel', writer), zymlja (for zemlja, land)...
      >
      > The author may have not been highly educated, but she wrote in
      > completely normal phonetic spelling, appropriate of the
      > political/educational environment of the time, of her natural Rusyn
      > language.
      >
      >
      >
    • Armata, Joseph R
      Interesting, and thanks! How would you read the first two lines of the postcard? We ve all had trouble making firm sense out of it. And one other thing - in
      Message 54 of 54 , Sep 25, 2008
        Interesting, and thanks! How would you read the first two lines of the postcard? We've all had trouble making firm sense out of it.

        And one other thing - in the short part at the top written vertically, the writer wrote "pisit" several times, which I figured had to intend the imperative (Write!), though the form looks like it really is "he/she writes". A few words farther on, there's what I recognize as a real imperative ("piszte nam" - Write us), then farther on "piszali" (past participle form). Any thoughts on that? Was the writer just getting tired, or are these all good grammatical imperative forms in the dialect?

        Joe


        > On "Minyi":
        > Yes, almost; it's the 1st person singular dative ("to me"). In Rusyn it
        > would normally be spelled "meni" but in this particular Lowlander
        > dialect of Rusyn, the vowel "e" in that position goes to a "y" sound
        > (rhymes with i in "fit", same y as in the word Rusyn), and the "yi" as
        > others noted is the Hungarian orthography's representation of a
        > palatized n before the i. You might also transliterate it from Cyrillic
        > as mynji. Other examples of this in the Lowlander Rusyn dialects are
        > dyn' (for den', day), dnys' (for dnes', today), typyr' (for teper',
        > now), pysatyl' (for pysatel', writer), zymlja (for zemlja, land)...
        >
        > The author may have not been highly educated, but she wrote in
        > completely normal phonetic spelling, appropriate of the
        > political/educational environment of the time, of her natural Rusyn
        > language.
        >
        >
        >
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