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Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

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  • Ben Sorensen
    Hey there, Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every
    Message 1 of 26 , Sep 2, 2008
      Hey there,
      Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
      We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
      Ben
      --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...> wrote:

      From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 4:40 PM






       
      On the molasses issue -- the cousins were curious about the dark junk in the bottle -- I said molasses -- or in England Strickle -- blank stares -- so I said -- here, taste it --
       
      you should have seen their faces -- apparently nothing they'd ever tried before -- so I'm thinking moleasses is not a staple in the Slovak kitchen.
       
       
       
      Caye

      --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net> wrote:

      From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 3:14 PM

      Paul,

      You DID mean to say "Sour Cream", rather then "Cream Cheese", didn't I? And, although I don't wish to be picky, it's "Break Out", not "Breat Out". You're too hard on me. We don't wish to have our fellow Slovaks think we're illiterate, do we?

      Yourself, Paul

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Paul Wolsko
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:09 PM
      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

      Julie,

      I'm a long-term list member, but can't think of any potato-molasses connection. I asked my wife, who is also of Slovak extraction, and she cannot recall anything as well. Only potato thing that stands out to her was a paoato-onion mush hat was dipped in buttermilk before eating, which I also recall. That was in the days when buttermilk contained butter. But, no, we cannot think of anything with molasses.

      For tonight's dinner, I found a bag of her pirohy in the deep-freeze that wasn't freezer-burned, so I'll brown some onions, breat out the cream cheese and we'll have a cholesterol assault on our arteries tonight. If you find anything, be sure to let us all know. I don't post very much, but when the topic turns to food, you can be sure I'll chime in.

      Best!!!

      Paul Wolsko
      Hopatcong, New Jersey (originally from Passaic, New Jersey) and...

      Kathie Wolsko (nee Yura) (originally from Hazleton, Pennsylvania)

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Julie Michutka
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 1:10 PM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

      I seem to be reading a lot about peasant life this year. Makes me
      feel better about not having a McMansion, I guess, since I'm so much
      better off than my peasant ancestors! Anyway, I came across something
      I didn't quite understand in an interesting little book called The
      Village of Viriatino, an Ethnographic Study of a Russian Village from
      before the Revolution to the Present ("present" being 1950s).

      On p. 18, in a discussion of which crops were grown by the peasants
      and changes in what they chose to grow, it says, "Potatoes, which in
      the first years after the peasant reform occupied a small part of the
      fields, were increasingly grown after a molasses factory was built in
      Sosnovka; but the people of Viriatino grew them more for personal than
      commercial consumption. "

      Long-time listmembers are now groaning, "she's at it again about
      potatoes!" Yes, indeed. But I have never before come across anything
      that links potatoes with molasses???? The only thing I can find by
      googling is both potatoes and molasses being used in the making of
      vodka, but apparently the use of molasses is considered cheating or
      substandard or not-really-vodka. (Can you tell I know nothing about
      vodka?)

      So what's the potato-molasses connection? Was the molasses factory
      really a vodka distillery, or is there something else I don't know
      about? (there's a LOT I don't know about.....)

      I told you it was a weird question.... and since the book is about
      peasants, and so many of our Slovak ancestors fell into that category,
      I thought maybe someone on the list might possibly know.

      Julie Michutka
      jmm@pathbridge. net

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Edward T. Surkosky
      Molasses is a by-product of sugar. In the New World it was made from sugar cane. This is why France and England strove to maintain the island in the
      Message 2 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
        Molasses is a by-product of sugar. In the New World it was made from sugar
        cane. This is why France and England strove to maintain the island in the
        Caribbean.Then they began making sugar from beets. All sugar production in
        Europe used beets because they could grow them there. Were any beets grown
        in the area?

        Ed Surkosky

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Ben Sorensen" <cerrunos1@...>
        To: <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 11:14 PM
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question


        Hey there,
        Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised
        if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every
        tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the
        name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum
        was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West
        indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
        We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
        Ben
        --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...> wr
      • Caye Caswick
          Interesting, I ll have to show them this and see if they have a different reaction.   Thanks, Ben.       Caye ... From: Ben Sorensen
        Message 3 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
           
          Interesting, I'll have to show them this and see if they have a different reaction.
           
          Thanks, Ben.
           
           
           
          Caye


          --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:

          From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 10:14 PM






          Hey there,
          Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
          We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
          Ben
          --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

          From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 4:40 PM

           
          On the molasses issue -- the cousins were curious about the dark junk in the bottle -- I said molasses -- or in England Strickle -- blank stares -- so I said -- here, taste it --
           
          you should have seen their faces -- apparently nothing they'd ever tried before -- so I'm thinking moleasses is not a staple in the Slovak kitchen.
           
           
           
          Caye

          --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net> wrote:

          From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 3:14 PM

          Paul,

          You DID mean to say "Sour Cream", rather then "Cream Cheese", didn't I? And, although I don't wish to be picky, it's "Break Out", not "Breat Out". You're too hard on me. We don't wish to have our fellow Slovaks think we're illiterate, do we?

          Yourself, Paul

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Paul Wolsko
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:09 PM
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

          Julie,

          I'm a long-term list member, but can't think of any potato-molasses connection. I asked my wife, who is also of Slovak extraction, and she cannot recall anything as well. Only potato thing that stands out to her was a paoato-onion mush hat was dipped in buttermilk before eating, which I also recall. That was in the days when buttermilk contained butter. But, no, we cannot think of anything with molasses.

          For tonight's dinner, I found a bag of her pirohy in the deep-freeze that wasn't freezer-burned, so I'll brown some onions, breat out the cream cheese and we'll have a cholesterol assault on our arteries tonight. If you find anything, be sure to let us all know. I don't post very much, but when the topic turns to food, you can be sure I'll chime in.

          Best!!!

          Paul Wolsko
          Hopatcong, New Jersey (originally from Passaic, New Jersey) and...

          Kathie Wolsko (nee Yura) (originally from Hazleton, Pennsylvania)

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Julie Michutka
          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 1:10 PM
          Subject: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

          I seem to be reading a lot about peasant life this year. Makes me
          feel better about not having a McMansion, I guess, since I'm so much
          better off than my peasant ancestors! Anyway, I came across something
          I didn't quite understand in an interesting little book called The
          Village of Viriatino, an Ethnographic Study of a Russian Village from
          before the Revolution to the Present ("present" being 1950s).

          On p. 18, in a discussion of which crops were grown by the peasants
          and changes in what they chose to grow, it says, "Potatoes, which in
          the first years after the peasant reform occupied a small part of the
          fields, were increasingly grown after a molasses factory was built in
          Sosnovka; but the people of Viriatino grew them more for personal than
          commercial consumption. "

          Long-time listmembers are now groaning, "she's at it again about
          potatoes!" Yes, indeed. But I have never before come across anything
          that links potatoes with molasses???? The only thing I can find by
          googling is both potatoes and molasses being used in the making of
          vodka, but apparently the use of molasses is considered cheating or
          substandard or not-really-vodka. (Can you tell I know nothing about
          vodka?)

          So what's the potato-molasses connection? Was the molasses factory
          really a vodka distillery, or is there something else I don't know
          about? (there's a LOT I don't know about.....)

          I told you it was a weird question.... and since the book is about
          peasants, and so many of our Slovak ancestors fell into that category,
          I thought maybe someone on the list might possibly know.

          Julie Michutka
          jmm@pathbridge. net

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ben Sorensen
          Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka- originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do) with a fipple cut
          Message 4 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
            Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka- originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do) with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play melodies.  I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske" melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising to me....
            Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia- most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
            Slovak ingenuity!
            Ben

            --- On Wed, 9/3/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...> wrote:

            From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 9:35 AM






             
            Interesting, I'll have to show them this and see if they have a different reaction.
             
            Thanks, Ben.
             
             
             
            Caye

            --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:

            From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 10:14 PM

            Hey there,
            Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
            We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
            Ben
            --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

            From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 4:40 PM

             
            On the molasses issue -- the cousins were curious about the dark junk in the bottle -- I said molasses -- or in England Strickle -- blank stares -- so I said -- here, taste it --
             
            you should have seen their faces -- apparently nothing they'd ever tried before -- so I'm thinking moleasses is not a staple in the Slovak kitchen.
             
             
             
            Caye

            --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net> wrote:

            From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
            Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 3:14 PM

            Paul,

            You DID mean to say "Sour Cream", rather then "Cream Cheese", didn't I? And, although I don't wish to be picky, it's "Break Out", not "Breat Out". You're too hard on me. We don't wish to have our fellow Slovaks think we're illiterate, do we?

            Yourself, Paul

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Paul Wolsko
            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:09 PM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

            Julie,

            I'm a long-term list member, but can't think of any potato-molasses connection. I asked my wife, who is also of Slovak extraction, and she cannot recall anything as well. Only potato thing that stands out to her was a paoato-onion mush hat was dipped in buttermilk before eating, which I also recall. That was in the days when buttermilk contained butter. But, no, we cannot think of anything with molasses.

            For tonight's dinner, I found a bag of her pirohy in the deep-freeze that wasn't freezer-burned, so I'll brown some onions, breat out the cream cheese and we'll have a cholesterol assault on our arteries tonight. If you find anything, be sure to let us all know. I don't post very much, but when the topic turns to food, you can be sure I'll chime in.

            Best!!!

            Paul Wolsko
            Hopatcong, New Jersey (originally from Passaic, New Jersey) and...

            Kathie Wolsko (nee Yura) (originally from Hazleton, Pennsylvania)

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Julie Michutka
            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 1:10 PM
            Subject: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

            I seem to be reading a lot about peasant life this year. Makes me
            feel better about not having a McMansion, I guess, since I'm so much
            better off than my peasant ancestors! Anyway, I came across something
            I didn't quite understand in an interesting little book called The
            Village of Viriatino, an Ethnographic Study of a Russian Village from
            before the Revolution to the Present ("present" being 1950s).

            On p. 18, in a discussion of which crops were grown by the peasants
            and changes in what they chose to grow, it says, "Potatoes, which in
            the first years after the peasant reform occupied a small part of the
            fields, were increasingly grown after a molasses factory was built in
            Sosnovka; but the people of Viriatino grew them more for personal than
            commercial consumption. "

            Long-time listmembers are now groaning, "she's at it again about
            potatoes!" Yes, indeed. But I have never before come across anything
            that links potatoes with molasses???? The only thing I can find by
            googling is both potatoes and molasses being used in the making of
            vodka, but apparently the use of molasses is considered cheating or
            substandard or not-really-vodka. (Can you tell I know nothing about
            vodka?)

            So what's the potato-molasses connection? Was the molasses factory
            really a vodka distillery, or is there something else I don't know
            about? (there's a LOT I don't know about.....)

            I told you it was a weird question.... and since the book is about
            peasants, and so many of our Slovak ancestors fell into that category,
            I thought maybe someone on the list might possibly know.

            Julie Michutka
            jmm@pathbridge. net

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • fbican@att.net
            Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf. I remember doing that as a child, but never knew where it from. Perhaps from my
            Message 5 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
              "Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf."

              I remember doing that as a child, but never knew where it from. Perhaps from my grandmother from Bratislava? We also used to pick milkweed stems and hollow them out to make "flutes". I wonder if that's related?

              Kindest regards,

              Skeeter

              -------------- Original message from Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>: --------------

              Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka- originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do) with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play melodies. I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske" melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising to me....
              Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia- most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
              Slovak ingenuity!
              Ben

              --- On Wed, 9/3/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...> wrote:

              From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 9:35 AM


              Interesting, I'll have to show them this and see if they have a different reaction.

              Thanks, Ben.



              Caye

              --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:

              From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 10:14 PM

              Hey there,
              Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
              We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
              Ben
              --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

              From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 4:40 PM


              On the molasses issue -- the cousins were curious about the dark junk in the bottle -- I said molasses -- or in England Strickle -- blank stares -- so I said -- here, taste it --

              you should have seen their faces -- apparently nothing they'd ever tried before -- so I'm thinking moleasses is not a staple in the Slovak kitchen.



              Caye

              --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net> wrote:

              From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 3:14 PM

              Paul,

              You DID mean to say "Sour Cream", rather then "Cream Cheese", didn't I? And, although I don't wish to be picky, it's "Break Out", not "Breat Out". You're too hard on me. We don't wish to have our fellow Slovaks think we're illiterate, do we?

              Yourself, Paul

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Paul Wolsko
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:09 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

              Julie,

              I'm a long-term list member, but can't think of any potato-molasses connection. I asked my wife, who is also of Slovak extraction, and she cannot recall anything as well. Only potato thing that stands out to her was a paoato-onion mush hat was dipped in buttermilk before eating, which I also recall. That was in the days when buttermilk contained butter. But, no, we cannot think of anything with molasses.

              For tonight's dinner, I found a bag of her pirohy in the deep-freeze that wasn't freezer-burned, so I'll brown some onions, breat out the cream cheese and we'll have a cholesterol assault on our arteries tonight. If you find anything, be sure to let us all know. I don't post very much, but when the topic turns to food, you can be sure I'll chime in.

              Best!!!

              Paul Wolsko
              Hopatcong, New Jersey (originally from Passaic, New Jersey) and...

              Kathie Wolsko (nee Yura) (originally from Hazleton, Pennsylvania)

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Julie Michutka
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 1:10 PM
              Subject: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

              I seem to be reading a lot about peasant life this year. Makes me
              feel better about not having a McMansion, I guess, since I'm so much
              better off than my peasant ancestors! Anyway, I came across something
              I didn't quite understand in an interesting little book called The
              Village of Viriatino, an Ethnographic Study of a Russian Village from
              before the Revolution to the Present ("present" being 1950s).

              On p. 18, in a discussion of which crops were grown by the peasants
              and changes in what they chose to grow, it says, "Potatoes, which in
              the first years after the peasant reform occupied a small part of the
              fields, were increasingly grown after a molasses factory was built in
              Sosnovka; but the people of Viriatino grew them more for personal than
              commercial consumption. "

              Long-time listmembers are now groaning, "she's at it again about
              potatoes!" Yes, indeed. But I have never before come across anything
              that links potatoes with molasses???? The only thing I can find by
              googling is both potatoes and molasses being used in the making of
              vodka, but apparently the use of molasses is considered cheating or
              substandard or not-really-vodka. (Can you tell I know nothing about
              vodka?)

              So what's the potato-molasses connection? Was the molasses factory
              really a vodka distillery, or is there something else I don't know
              about? (there's a LOT I don't know about.....)

              I told you it was a weird question.... and since the book is about
              peasants, and so many of our Slovak ancestors fell into that category,
              I thought maybe someone on the list might possibly know.

              Julie Michutka
              jmm@pathbridge. net

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Caye Caswick
                Wow, Skeeter, you musta been from the other side of the tracks, when I lived in Cleveland, we played with mudpies and tied Campbells soup cans together with
              Message 6 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                 
                Wow, Skeeter, you musta been from the other side of the tracks, when I lived in Cleveland, we played with mudpies and tied Campbells soup cans together with string so we could talk to the next door neighbors out the attic windows.
                 
                 

                Caye


                --- On Wed, 9/3/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 9:23 AM






                "Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf."

                I remember doing that as a child, but never knew where it from. Perhaps from my grandmother from Bratislava? We also used to pick milkweed stems and hollow them out to make "flutes". I wonder if that's related?

                Kindest regards,

                Skeeter

                ------------ -- Original message from Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>: ------------ --

                Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka- originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do) with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play melodies. I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske" melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising to me....
                Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia- most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
                Slovak ingenuity!
                Ben

                --- On Wed, 9/3/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

                From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 9:35 AM

                Interesting, I'll have to show them this and see if they have a different reaction.

                Thanks, Ben.



                Caye

                --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:

                From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 10:14 PM

                Hey there,
                Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
                We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
                Ben
                --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

                From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 4:40 PM

                On the molasses issue -- the cousins were curious about the dark junk in the bottle -- I said molasses -- or in England Strickle -- blank stares -- so I said -- here, taste it --

                you should have seen their faces -- apparently nothing they'd ever tried before -- so I'm thinking moleasses is not a staple in the Slovak kitchen.



                Caye

                --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net> wrote:

                From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 3:14 PM

                Paul,

                You DID mean to say "Sour Cream", rather then "Cream Cheese", didn't I? And, although I don't wish to be picky, it's "Break Out", not "Breat Out". You're too hard on me. We don't wish to have our fellow Slovaks think we're illiterate, do we?

                Yourself, Paul

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Paul Wolsko
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:09 PM
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

                Julie,

                I'm a long-term list member, but can't think of any potato-molasses connection. I asked my wife, who is also of Slovak extraction, and she cannot recall anything as well. Only potato thing that stands out to her was a paoato-onion mush hat was dipped in buttermilk before eating, which I also recall. That was in the days when buttermilk contained butter. But, no, we cannot think of anything with molasses.

                For tonight's dinner, I found a bag of her pirohy in the deep-freeze that wasn't freezer-burned, so I'll brown some onions, breat out the cream cheese and we'll have a cholesterol assault on our arteries tonight. If you find anything, be sure to let us all know. I don't post very much, but when the topic turns to food, you can be sure I'll chime in.

                Best!!!

                Paul Wolsko
                Hopatcong, New Jersey (originally from Passaic, New Jersey) and...

                Kathie Wolsko (nee Yura) (originally from Hazleton, Pennsylvania)

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Julie Michutka
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 1:10 PM
                Subject: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

                I seem to be reading a lot about peasant life this year. Makes me
                feel better about not having a McMansion, I guess, since I'm so much
                better off than my peasant ancestors! Anyway, I came across something
                I didn't quite understand in an interesting little book called The
                Village of Viriatino, an Ethnographic Study of a Russian Village from
                before the Revolution to the Present ("present" being 1950s).

                On p. 18, in a discussion of which crops were grown by the peasants
                and changes in what they chose to grow, it says, "Potatoes, which in
                the first years after the peasant reform occupied a small part of the
                fields, were increasingly grown after a molasses factory was built in
                Sosnovka; but the people of Viriatino grew them more for personal than
                commercial consumption. "

                Long-time listmembers are now groaning, "she's at it again about
                potatoes!" Yes, indeed. But I have never before come across anything
                that links potatoes with molasses???? The only thing I can find by
                googling is both potatoes and molasses being used in the making of
                vodka, but apparently the use of molasses is considered cheating or
                substandard or not-really-vodka. (Can you tell I know nothing about
                vodka?)

                So what's the potato-molasses connection? Was the molasses factory
                really a vodka distillery, or is there something else I don't know
                about? (there's a LOT I don't know about.....)

                I told you it was a weird question.... and since the book is about
                peasants, and so many of our Slovak ancestors fell into that category,
                I thought maybe someone on the list might possibly know.

                Julie Michutka
                jmm@pathbridge. net

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Julie Michutka
                ... I ve seen this done in Slovakia.... it was amazing.... the musician said it took him 2 months to learn to do it. He had been playing the violin earlier,
                Message 7 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                  On Sep 3, 2008, at 9:54 AM, Ben Sorensen wrote:

                  > Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf.
                  > If you have never heard this, go to Slovakia, and you will find a
                  > few who can do this in central Slovakia- most famous was Jozef
                  > Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a pistalka nearby... a
                  > leaf was just as good. He not only played melodies, but improvised
                  > around them- until the leaf finally split....

                  I've seen this done in Slovakia.... it was amazing.... the musician
                  said it took him 2 months to learn to do it. He had been playing the
                  violin earlier, and the melody he played on the leaf was just as
                  intricate.

                  Julie Michutka
                  jmm@...
                • fbican@att.net
                  Caye-- Indeed. When I grew up (1950 s-1960 s), Broadview Heights was considered out in the boonies . We tried the cans n string thing, but the houses were
                  Message 8 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                    Caye--

                    Indeed. When I grew up (1950's-1960's), Broadview Heights was considered "out in the boonies". We tried the cans'n'string thing, but the houses were just too far apart. Fortunately for me, I was an elektronicky from day one, and built some walkie-talkies. We used those instead.

                    As for the mliecny burina flutes, it was old farmland, and they grew everywhere, along with elderberries, strawberries, blackberries, raaspberries, black cherries, hicory nuts, acorns, sassafras (for making tea), and Lord knows what else we ate. No mudpies that I can recall. ;-)

                    Kindest regards,

                    Skeeter

                    -------------- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>: --------------


                    Wow, Skeeter, you musta been from the other side of the tracks, when I lived in Cleveland, we played with mudpies and tied Campbells soup cans together with string so we could talk to the next door neighbors out the attic windows.



                    Caye

                    --- On Wed, 9/3/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                    From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 9:23 AM

                    "Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf."

                    I remember doing that as a child, but never knew where it from. Perhaps from my grandmother from Bratislava? We also used to pick milkweed stems and hollow them out to make "flutes". I wonder if that's related?

                    Kindest regards,

                    Skeeter

                    ------------ -- Original message from Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>: ------------ --

                    Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka- originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do) with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play melodies. I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske" melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising to me....
                    Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia- most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
                    Slovak ingenuity!
                    Ben

                    --- On Wed, 9/3/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

                    From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 9:35 AM

                    Interesting, I'll have to show them this and see if they have a different reaction.

                    Thanks, Ben.

                    Caye

                    --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> wrote:

                    From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com>
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 10:14 PM

                    Hey there,
                    Molasses is in the Slovak kitchen, called melasa. I would not be surprised if potatos can be used for this production- especially if you have every tried the byproduct of molasses- RUM! In Slovakia, they had to change the name of the liquor to "Um" (I am NOT kidding) due to regulations- Slovak rum was not considered "true" rum so they couldn't call it that. Rum in the West indies is either made from beets or sugarcane, as is molasses.
                    We used molasses in Slovakia- for a range of things. It was wonderful...
                    Ben
                    --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com> wrote:

                    From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 4:40 PM

                    On the molasses issue -- the cousins were curious about the dark junk in the bottle -- I said molasses -- or in England Strickle -- blank stares -- so I said -- here, taste it --

                    you should have seen their faces -- apparently nothing they'd ever tried before -- so I'm thinking moleasses is not a staple in the Slovak kitchen.

                    Caye

                    --- On Tue, 9/2/08, Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net> wrote:

                    From: Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Tuesday, September 2, 2008, 3:14 PM

                    Paul,

                    You DID mean to say "Sour Cream", rather then "Cream Cheese", didn't I? And, although I don't wish to be picky, it's "Break Out", not "Breat Out". You're too hard on me. We don't wish to have our fellow Slovaks think we're illiterate, do we?

                    Yourself, Paul

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Paul Wolsko
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 4:09 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

                    Julie,

                    I'm a long-term list member, but can't think of any potato-molasses connection. I asked my wife, who is also of Slovak extraction, and she cannot recall anything as well. Only potato thing that stands out to her was a paoato-onion mush hat was dipped in buttermilk before eating, which I also recall. That was in the days when buttermilk contained butter. But, no, we cannot think of anything with molasses.

                    For tonight's dinner, I found a bag of her pirohy in the deep-freeze that wasn't freezer-burned, so I'll brown some onions, breat out the cream cheese and we'll have a cholesterol assault on our arteries tonight. If you find anything, be sure to let us all know. I don't post very much, but when the topic turns to food, you can be sure I'll chime in.

                    Best!!!

                    Paul Wolsko
                    Hopatcong, New Jersey (originally from Passaic, New Jersey) and...

                    Kathie Wolsko (nee Yura) (originally from Hazleton, Pennsylvania)

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Julie Michutka
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 1:10 PM
                    Subject: [Slovak-World] today's weird question

                    I seem to be reading a lot about peasant life this year. Makes me
                    feel better about not having a McMansion, I guess, since I'm so much
                    better off than my peasant ancestors! Anyway, I came across something
                    I didn't quite understand in an interesting little book called The
                    Village of Viriatino, an Ethnographic Study of a Russian Village from
                    before the Revolution to the Present ("present" being 1950s).

                    On p. 18, in a discussion of which crops were grown by the peasants
                    and changes in what they chose to grow, it says, "Potatoes, which in
                    the first years after the peasant reform occupied a small part of the
                    fields, were increasingly grown after a molasses factory was built in
                    Sosnovka; but the people of Viriatino grew them more for personal than
                    commercial consumption. "

                    Long-time listmembers are now groaning, "she's at it again about
                    potatoes!" Yes, indeed. But I have never before come across anything
                    that links potatoes with molasses???? The only thing I can find by
                    googling is both potatoes and molasses being used in the making of
                    vodka, but apparently the use of molasses is considered cheating or
                    substandard or not-really-vodka. (Can you tell I know nothing about
                    vodka?)

                    So what's the potato-molasses connection? Was the molasses factory
                    really a vodka distillery, or is there something else I don't know
                    about? (there's a LOT I don't know about.....)

                    I told you it was a weird question.... and since the book is about
                    peasants, and so many of our Slovak ancestors fell into that category,
                    I thought maybe someone on the list might possibly know.

                    Julie Michutka
                    jmm@pathbridge. net

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • durisek
                    Do we have videos of any folks playing the leaf? I want to see/hear! Smiles.. Zuzka D. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                      Do we have videos of any folks playing the leaf?
                      I want to see/hear!
                      Smiles.. Zuzka D.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Armata, Joseph R
                      Not to take anything from the ingenious Slovaks, but the overtone flutes (no holes except for the outlet, played by closing/opening the outlet with your
                      Message 10 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                        Not to take anything from the ingenious Slovaks, but the overtone flutes (no holes except for the outlet, played by closing/opening the outlet with your finger) and playing melodies on leaves aren't really Slovak inventions; they're widespread in Eastern Europe and elsewhere in the world. I haven't heard Vyboh's play, but heard some real masters from Bulgaria and Poland. When you hear it, you can't believe it's just a leaf, and not some real musical instrument they're playing.

                        Chains to manage roof water runoff are called rain chains over here.

                        Joe


                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-
                        > World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ben Sorensen
                        > Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2008 9:55 AM
                        > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                        >
                        > Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka-
                        > originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do)
                        > with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be
                        > directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I
                        > am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks
                        > then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play
                        > melodies. I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske"
                        > melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that
                        > is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava
                        > are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising
                        > to me....
                        > Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-
                        > spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just
                        > chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we
                        > have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that
                        > play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to
                        > Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia-
                        > most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a
                        > pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played
                        > melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
                        > Slovak ingenuity!
                        > Ben
                      • fbican@att.net
                        If you think about it, saxophones, clarinets, oboes, bassoons... they re all reed instruments, not all that distant from a leaf, only a lot more expensive. I
                        Message 11 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                          If you think about it, saxophones, clarinets, oboes, bassoons... they're all reed instruments, not all that distant from a leaf, only a lot more expensive. I did have a German-silver clarinet many years ago, but I was never very good at it. I regret that I didn't keep it, however. I think we donated it to a school band. Probably just as well.

                          Kindest regards,

                          Skeeter

                          -------------- Original message from "Armata, Joseph R" <armata+@...>: --------------

                          Not to take anything from the ingenious Slovaks, but the overtone flutes (no holes except for the outlet, played by closing/opening the outlet with your finger) and playing melodies on leaves aren't really Slovak inventions; they're widespread in Eastern Europe and elsewhere in the world. I haven't heard Vyboh's play, but heard some real masters from Bulgaria and Poland. When you hear it, you can't believe it's just a leaf, and not some real musical instrument they're playing.

                          Chains to manage roof water runoff are called rain chains over here.

                          Joe

                          > -----Original Message-----
                          > From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-
                          > World@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ben Sorensen
                          > Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2008 9:55 AM
                          > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                          >
                          > Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka-
                          > originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do)
                          > with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be
                          > directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I
                          > am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks
                          > then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play
                          > melodies. I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske"
                          > melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that
                          > is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava
                          > are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising
                          > to me....
                          > Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-
                          > spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just
                          > chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we
                          > have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that
                          > play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to
                          > Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia-
                          > most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a
                          > pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played
                          > melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
                          > Slovak ingenuity!
                          > Ben




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • luci
                            Actually, it is indeed a world-wide phenomenon. If you go to youtube.com - and put in music from leaves  in that search you will find a huge diversity
                          Message 12 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                             
                            Actually, it is indeed a world-wide phenomenon. If you go to youtube.com - and put in "music from leaves"  in that search you will find a huge diversity of humanity, all showing off their leaf playing expertise.  Actually, I understand there are formal contests in Goa.
                             
                            Luci

                            --- On Wed, 9/3/08, Armata, Joseph R <armata+@...> wrote:

                            From: Armata, Joseph R <armata+@...>
                            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                            To: "Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com" <Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com>
                            Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 12:51 PM






                            Not to take anything from the ingenious Slovaks, but the overtone flutes (no holes except for the outlet, played by closing/opening the outlet with your finger) and playing melodies on leaves aren't really Slovak inventions; they're widespread in Eastern Europe and elsewhere in the world. I haven't heard Vyboh's play, but heard some real masters from Bulgaria and Poland. When you hear it, you can't believe it's just a leaf, and not some real musical instrument they're playing.

                            Chains to manage roof water runoff are called rain chains over here.

                            Joe

                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak-
                            > World@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Ben Sorensen
                            > Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2008 9:55 AM
                            > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                            > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] today's weird question
                            >
                            > Slovaks make anything from everything. :-) Think about the koncovka-
                            > originally it was a piece of willow that was hollowed out (easy to do)
                            > with a fipple cut into the top. it was just a "V" and the air would be
                            > directed onto the edge with a very basic embroucher- something that I
                            > am sure that many American children did. The difference- the Slovaks
                            > then began to open and close the end with a finger or two and play
                            > melodies. I believe that these melodies gave way to the "terchovske"
                            > melodies that are popular in Slovakia today. Why? because the mode that
                            > is found on that hollowed piece of willow and songs from Terchova/Orava
                            > are the same! (Lydian). So, Slovaks making melasa is not as surprising
                            > to me....
                            > Heck, look at their embroidery and Detvianske crosses! Look at chain-
                            > spouts! (These are water "spouts" that hang from guttered roofs- just
                            > chains that direct rainwater downwards. They work too... where as we
                            > have piping for this run-off). Most of all, look at the people that
                            > play entire melodies on a leaf. If you have never heard this, go to
                            > Slovakia, and you will find a few who can do this in central Slovakia-
                            > most famous was Jozef Vyboh- a great musician. If he didn't have a
                            > pistalka nearby... a leaf was just as good. He not only played
                            > melodies, but improvised around them- until the leaf finally split....
                            > Slovak ingenuity!
                            > Ben


















                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Nick Holcz
                            Eucalyptus leaves are used for music in Australia . it must be a common thing in a lot of cultures. Nick
                            Message 13 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                              Eucalyptus leaves are used for music in Australia . it must be a
                              common thing in a lot of cultures.

                              Nick
                            • fbican@att.net
                              When I was a kid, we used to make hudba by putting a leaf (didn t seem to matter which, as long as they weren t too big) between our thumbs. Blow through it,
                              Message 14 of 26 , Sep 3, 2008
                                When I was a kid, we used to make hudba by putting a leaf (didn't seem to matter which, as long as they weren't too big) between our thumbs. Blow through it, and that was all it took.

                                Since then, I've gone through thousands of dollars of musical instruments, but I don't think any were more fun just plucking a leaf and playing it!

                                Kindest regards,

                                Skeeter

                                -------------- Original message from Nick Holcz <nickh@...>: --------------

                                Eucalyptus leaves are used for music in Australia . it must be a
                                common thing in a lot of cultures.

                                Nick



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Ben Sorensen
                                ... From: fbican@att.net Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Music from leaves To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com Date: Thursday, September 4, 2008,
                                Message 15 of 26 , Sep 4, 2008
                                  --- On Thu, 9/4/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                                  From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Music from leaves
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Date: Thursday, September 4, 2008, 12:18 AM






                                  When I was a kid, we used to make hudba by putting a leaf (didn't seem to matter which, as long as they weren't too big) between our thumbs. Blow through it, and that was all it took.

                                  Since then, I've gone through thousands of dollars of musical instruments, but I don't think any were more fun just plucking a leaf and playing it!

                                  Kindest regards,

                                  Skeeter

                                  ------------ -- Original message from Nick Holcz <nickh@iinet. net.au>: ------------ --

                                  Eucalyptus leaves are used for music in Australia . it must be a
                                  common thing in a lot of cultures.

                                  Nick

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Ben Sorensen
                                  My computer just shot off a blank email- SORRY!!!   I can t agree more with you Skeeter, except I haven t learned how to play the leaf yet. I did, however,
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Sep 4, 2008
                                    My computer just shot off a blank email- SORRY!!!
                                     
                                    I can't agree more with you Skeeter, except I haven't learned how to play the leaf yet. I did, however, love getting a hose with a funneled end and spinning it around. I would whistle and sound ghostly- and by adjusting the speed it would change the note. I LOVED IT! and it was cheap to make.
                                     
                                    Another cheap instrument that was just fun was a kazoo- wax-paper and a comb!
                                    Ben

                                    --- On Thu, 9/4/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                                    From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Music from leaves
                                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Thursday, September 4, 2008, 12:18 AM






                                    When I was a kid, we used to make hudba by putting a leaf (didn't seem to matter which, as long as they weren't too big) between our thumbs. Blow through it, and that was all it took.

                                    Since then, I've gone through thousands of dollars of musical instruments, but I don't think any were more fun just plucking a leaf and playing it!

                                    Kindest regards,

                                    Skeeter

                                    ------------ -- Original message from Nick Holcz <nickh@iinet. net.au>: ------------ --

                                    Eucalyptus leaves are used for music in Australia . it must be a
                                    common thing in a lot of cultures.

                                    Nick

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Nick Holcz
                                    Australian aboriginals make a hole in the end of a flat piece of wood, tie a piece of string in it and whirl it around their heads. We called it a bullroarer.
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Sep 4, 2008
                                      Australian aboriginals make a hole in the end of a flat piece of
                                      wood, tie a piece of string in it and whirl it around their heads. We
                                      called it a bullroarer. When I was a boy we used our school rulers.

                                      Nick
                                    • fbican@att.net
                                      Speaking of fun, cheap musical instruments for kids, we also made bas gitara with an old 5-gallon pail, a length of string, and an old broomstick. You vary
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Sep 4, 2008
                                        Speaking of fun, cheap musical instruments for kids, we also made bas gitara with an old 5-gallon pail, a length of string, and an old broomstick. You vary the pitch by how much tension you put on the broomstick. Good fun for kids, and it costs nothing.

                                        Kindest regards,

                                        Skeeter

                                        -------------- Original message from Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>: --------------

                                        My computer just shot off a blank email- SORRY!!!

                                        I can't agree more with you Skeeter, except I haven't learned how to play the leaf yet. I did, however, love getting a hose with a funneled end and spinning it around. I would whistle and sound ghostly- and by adjusting the speed it would change the note. I LOVED IT! and it was cheap to make.

                                        Another cheap instrument that was just fun was a kazoo- wax-paper and a comb!
                                        Ben

                                        --- On Thu, 9/4/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                                        From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                                        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Music from leaves
                                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                        Date: Thursday, September 4, 2008, 12:18 AM

                                        When I was a kid, we used to make hudba by putting a leaf (didn't seem to matter which, as long as they weren't too big) between our thumbs. Blow through it, and that was all it took.

                                        Since then, I've gone through thousands of dollars of musical instruments, but I don't think any were more fun just plucking a leaf and playing it!

                                        Kindest regards,

                                        Skeeter

                                        ------------ -- Original message from Nick Holcz <nickh@iinet. net.au>: ------------ --

                                        Eucalyptus leaves are used for music in Australia . it must be a
                                        common thing in a lot of cultures.

                                        Nick

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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