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RE: [Slovak-World] Today's saying seems to be a quote

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  • Helen Fedor
    I meant that we have 3 separate reference sections: one with books covering the Czech Republic, one with books covering Slovakia, and one with books covering
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 29, 2008
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      I meant that we have 3 separate reference sections: one with books
      covering the Czech Republic, one with books covering Slovakia, and one
      with books covering the former Czechoslovakia.

      H



      >>> <fbican@...> 8/29/2008 12:18 PM >>>
      How lucky for you!

      My grandparents came from both Bratislava and Prague, so I still think
      of myself as Czechoslovakian. I'm well aware that they're separate
      entities now, but for my 55 years on this planet, they're still related.


      Kindest regards,

      Skeeter

      -------------- Original message from "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...>:
      --------------

      How sweet.

      It's called the Czech, Slovak, and Czech & Slovak reference
      collections
      at the Library of Congress. We have some pretty amazing books, some of
      them close at hand.

      I just found one more dictionary, called _Struc~ny etymologicky
      slovnik
      jazyka c~eskeho_, that gives a "cleaner" explanation. Acc'd to this, "
      < ovad > comes from the proto-Slavic < obad—ä >. Perhaps a
      proto-European verb. An old form of < hovad > (folk, also < hovado >):

      it bites primarily cattle < hovezi dobytek >."

      H

      >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> 8/29/2008 11:21 AM >>>
      Where do you find this stuff???? You found exactly what I was looking
      for...
      Ben

      zlatu hviezdicku uz mam. Sa vola Milka. :-)


      --- On Fri, 8/29/08, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

      From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Today's saying seems to be a quote
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, August 29, 2008, 11:10 AM

      I've checked two etymological dictionaries and found that the word is
      the same in both Slovak and Czech, except for a long "a" in the Czech
      word. Acc'd to one dictionary, < ovad > is the modern version of the
      proto-Slavic "obad", which coresponds with the Latin < tabanus > [the
      first part of the horsefly's scientific name]. Both of these words are
      derived from an unknown proto-European word.

      Another Czech etymological dictionary says that < ovad > is a
      development of the root for the word < ovce >, meaning "sheep". This
      version says that < ovad > meant/means "the thing that bites sheep"
      and
      relates it to < uodas >, meaning "mosquito". "It's often noted," says
      this entry, "that the < ovad > primarily annoys cattle [< hovezi
      dobytek
      > = folk usages <hovado > and < hovad >]."

      Another explanation given by this dictionary is that < ovad > is
      related to < vadit >, "to hamper", and means "the thing that hampers
      (livestock)" .

      So take your pick as to the exact meaning, but there seems to be a
      connection between the fly and the animal(s). Take a < zlata
      hviezdic~ka
      > out of petty cash, Ben.

      H

      >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 8/29/2008 10:36 AM >>>
      I fixed that. :-P
      But being that it is ovad and hovado is a head of cattle or livestock,
      I was wondering if there is a link....
      Ben

      --- On Fri, 8/29/08, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

      From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Today's saying seems to be a quote
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Friday, August 29, 2008, 10:33 AM

      Ben,
      The word for horsefly is < ovad >, not < hovad >.

      H

      >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 8/29/2008 10:14 AM >>>
      Another word that is used for hovado is "hajzel." It is a derogatory
      remark, literally "toilet." NOT polite at all, but... anyways, just
      wanted to kinda throw it out there. Hovado is not as derogatory, but
      they are kinda seen as synonyms when used pejoratively.

      Neither, however, will make for a good marriage, so use sparingly. :-)

      I think hovad is a horsefly... so I guess this goes to Martin and
      other
      Slovaks, is there derivation from this to "hovado?"

      Ben
      --- On Thu, 8/28/08, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

      From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Today's saying seems to be a quote
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Date: Thursday, August 28, 2008, 1:10 PM

      "Khuligan" is different from "hova:do", just as "hooligan" is
      different
      from "bastard" (to use the book's term). I think of a hooligan as more
      of a petty criminal or someone who engages in anti-social behavior,
      where "hova:do" is someone with disgusting habits/manners and isn't
      necessarily very bright.

      H

      >>> "John Polko" <johnpolko@rogers. com> 8/28/2008 10:16:26 AM >>>
      Hi Helen,

      The word Hooligan seems to describe the graffiti-ons in Russian,
      Ukranian,
      Slovak, Czech, Austria etc.

      Regards,

      John e. Polko
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak- World@
      yahoogroups. com]On
      Behalf Of Helen Fedor
      Sent: August 28, 2008 9:41 AM
      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Today's saying seems to be a quote

      The Czech equivalent of this "saying" is attributed to Has~ek, I
      assume,
      from his "Good Soldier Schweik":

      Prec~o ma Boh tresce tymto hova:dom?

      "Why does God punish me with this bastard?"

      In most of the equivalents given (11 languages in addition to Slovak),
      the
      word for beast/brute/ cattle is used as the insulting term, just as, I
      supposed, we'd call someone a "dumb ox" in English.

      H

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