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Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Sayings

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  • fbican@att.net
    Eliz-- This one is my particular favorite, If you value it, take care of it This is one my dad drilled into my head many years ago. I don t know how many
    Message 1 of 27 , Aug 6, 2008
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      Eliz--

      This one is my particular favorite,

      "If you value it, take care of it"

      This is one my dad drilled into my head many years ago. I don't know how many people here are interested in firearms (I know Nick Holcz does), but dad taught me "If you shoot it, clean it before you go to bed". Well, I have followed that rule religiously all my life, and have firearms used regularly that are as much as 50yrs old and still like new.

      Dad spent three years in Europe (France & Germany) during WWII with the US Army. His Army papers were stamped with a big red "PS" stamp, for "possible subversive" because his mother was born in Bratislava. She emmigrated to the US in 1898, at age 8, so I don't know where that would have made dad a subversive. Grandma was high-up at Czeska sin Karlin Hall. My other grandparents were from Prague.

      Oh well, I'm rambling here. There are a few more nuggets of wisdom in the Amish cookbook, and I'll post a couple more soon.

      Kindest regards,

      Skeeter

      -------------- Original message from "pmbetty2000" <ewood@...>: --------------

      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@... wrote:
      >
      > Ahoj!
      >
      > I got a new cookbook from Lehman Hardware in Kidron, OH today.
      >
      > http://www.lehmans.com/
      >
      > They cater to the Amish community, but I positively love the
      store. At any rate, the cookbook has many simple recipes, and is
      loaded with little tid-bits of wisdom. I thought I'd share this one:
      >
      > GOLDEN RULES FOR LIVING
      > If you open it, close it.
      > If you turn it on, turn it off.
      > If you unlock it, lock it up.
      > If you break it, admit it.
      > If you can't fix it, call in someone who can.
      > If you borrow it, return it.
      > If you value it, take care of it.
      > If you make a mess, clean it up.
      > If you move it, put it back.
      > If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it.
      > If you don't know how to operate it, leave it alone.
      > If it's none of your business, don't ask questions.
      >
      > Kindest regards,
      >
      > Skeeter

      Skeeter
      This is a great Quote. In fact these were the rules we raised our 7
      children by and they try doing the same with their families. Off
      this topic, I love your receipes and conversations about the slovak
      foods
      Regards
      Eliz
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pmbetty2000
      ... Also like that quote very much. Again, I was raised that way too. Regarding the firearms, all my sons and husband are also avid collectors and hunters.
      Message 2 of 27 , Aug 6, 2008
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        --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@... wrote:
        >Skeeter
        Also like that quote very much. Again, I was raised that way too.
        Regarding the firearms, all my sons and husband are also avid
        collectors and hunters. they follow this same rule\

        My husband spent 20 years in the Navy and when he was recommended
        for a LDO (limited duty office) they would have been investigating
        my family due to the fact that my grandparents were living with my
        parents and both were born in Slovakia, then a communist country.
        Never got to that point as he decided he did not want to do the
        extra 3 years to retire. It really bothered me at the time, but
        guess I can understand it now.

        We made a trip to Slovakia in 2000 to the birthplace of my
        grandparents. Wish we could go back
        Regards
        Eliz
        > Eliz--
        >
        > This one is my particular favorite,
        >
        > "If you value it, take care of it"
        >
        > This is one my dad drilled into my head many years ago. I don't
        know how many people here are interested in firearms (I know Nick
        Holcz does), but dad taught me "If you shoot it, clean it before you
        go to bed". Well, I have followed that rule religiously all my
        life, and have firearms used regularly that are as much as 50yrs old
        and still like new.
        >
        > Dad spent three years in Europe (France & Germany) during WWII
        with the US Army. His Army papers were stamped with a big red "PS"
        stamp, for "possible subversive" because his mother was born in
        Bratislava. She emmigrated to the US in 1898, at age 8, so I don't
        know where that would have made dad a subversive. Grandma was high-
        up at Czeska sin Karlin Hall. My other grandparents were from
        Prague.
        >
        > Oh well, I'm rambling here. There are a few more nuggets of
        wisdom in the Amish cookbook, and I'll post a couple more soon.
        >
        > Kindest regards,
        >
        > Skeeter
        >
        > -------------- Original message from "pmbetty2000" <ewood@...>: ---
        -----------
        >
        > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Ahoj!
        > >
        > > I got a new cookbook from Lehman Hardware in Kidron, OH today.
        > >
        > > http://www.lehmans.com/
        > >
        > > They cater to the Amish community, but I positively love the
        > store. At any rate, the cookbook has many simple recipes, and is
        > loaded with little tid-bits of wisdom. I thought I'd share this
        one:
        > >
        > > GOLDEN RULES FOR LIVING
        > > If you open it, close it.
        > > If you turn it on, turn it off.
        > > If you unlock it, lock it up.
        > > If you break it, admit it.
        > > If you can't fix it, call in someone who can.
        > > If you borrow it, return it.
        > > If you value it, take care of it.
        > > If you make a mess, clean it up.
        > > If you move it, put it back.
        > > If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it.
        > > If you don't know how to operate it, leave it alone.
        > > If it's none of your business, don't ask questions.
        > >
        > > Kindest regards,
        > >
        > > Skeeter
        >
        > Skeeter
        > This is a great Quote. In fact these were the rules we raised our
        7
        > children by and they try doing the same with their families. Off
        > this topic, I love your receipes and conversations about the
        slovak
        > foods
        > Regards
        > Eliz
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • fbican@att.net
        Helen-- I have no doubt that you re right. This is a collection of recipes and witicisms from 1955 to 2005. I do remember reading both Ann Landers and
        Message 3 of 27 , Aug 6, 2008
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          Helen--

          I have no doubt that you're right. This is a collection of recipes and witicisms from 1955 to 2005. I do remember reading both Ann Landers and Abigail VanBuren way back when. No one has been able to fill their shoes.

          Kindest regards,

          Skeeter

          -------------- Original message from "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...>: --------------

          I remember seeing this in Ann Landers' column many years ago.

          H

          >>> "pmbetty2000" <ewood@...> 8/6/2008 4:27:03 PM >>>
          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@... wrote:
          >
          > Ahoj!
          >
          > I got a new cookbook from Lehman Hardware in Kidron, OH today.
          >
          > http://www.lehmans.com/
          >
          > They cater to the Amish community, but I positively love the
          store. At any rate, the cookbook has many simple recipes, and is
          loaded with little tid-bits of wisdom. I thought I'd share this one:
          >
          > GOLDEN RULES FOR LIVING
          > If you open it, close it.
          > If you turn it on, turn it off.
          > If you unlock it, lock it up.
          > If you break it, admit it.
          > If you can't fix it, call in someone who can.
          > If you borrow it, return it.
          > If you value it, take care of it.
          > If you make a mess, clean it up.
          > If you move it, put it back.
          > If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it.
          > If you don't know how to operate it, leave it alone.
          > If it's none of your business, don't ask questions.
          >
          > Kindest regards,
          >
          > Skeeter

          Skeeter
          This is a great Quote. In fact these were the rules we raised our 7
          children by and they try doing the same with their families. Off
          this topic, I love your receipes and conversations about the slovak
          foods
          Regards
          Eliz
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • fbican@att.net
          My grandma Toman (Czech) could turn a wild rabbit into the best hassenpfeffer. Her recipe is long gone, if she ever even had one, but I know it used a lot of
          Message 4 of 27 , Aug 6, 2008
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            My grandma Toman (Czech) could turn a wild rabbit into the best hassenpfeffer. Her recipe is long gone, if she ever even had one, but I know it used a lot of kyslý krém, hríb, and rezanec that she'd roll out right on the kitchen table. Small wonder that grandma got to over 300lbs! Those old girls knew how to cook! And eat!

            I've tried making hassenpfeffer, but with store-bought rabbit, but never as good. Same thing goes for hus. Store-bought ones are nothing like wild ones. I did the hunting and cleaning, but mom did the cooking, also without a recipe. Roasted the hus with some cibuľa , hrib, hrdzavý, and zeler , and serverd it over spaetzle.

            I've had a big rabbit in my back yard a couple of times in my back yard, and I could probably take it down with one of the pellet guns without being noticed (hunting is illegal here).

            Hunting goes way back in my blood.

            Kindest regards,

            Skeeter

            -------------- Original message from "pmbetty2000" <ewood@...>: --------------

            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@... wrote:
            >Skeeter
            Also like that quote very much. Again, I was raised that way too.
            Regarding the firearms, all my sons and husband are also avid
            collectors and hunters. they follow this same rule\

            My husband spent 20 years in the Navy and when he was recommended
            for a LDO (limited duty office) they would have been investigating
            my family due to the fact that my grandparents were living with my
            parents and both were born in Slovakia, then a communist country.
            Never got to that point as he decided he did not want to do the
            extra 3 years to retire. It really bothered me at the time, but
            guess I can understand it now.

            We made a trip to Slovakia in 2000 to the birthplace of my
            grandparents. Wish we could go back
            Regards
            Eliz
            > Eliz--
            >
            > This one is my particular favorite,
            >
            > "If you value it, take care of it"
            >
            > This is one my dad drilled into my head many years ago. I don't
            know how many people here are interested in firearms (I know Nick
            Holcz does), but dad taught me "If you shoot it, clean it before you
            go to bed". Well, I have followed that rule religiously all my
            life, and have firearms used regularly that are as much as 50yrs old
            and still like new.
            >
            > Dad spent three years in Europe (France & Germany) during WWII
            with the US Army. His Army papers were stamped with a big red "PS"
            stamp, for "possible subversive" because his mother was born in
            Bratislava. She emmigrated to the US in 1898, at age 8, so I don't
            know where that would have made dad a subversive. Grandma was high-
            up at Czeska sin Karlin Hall. My other grandparents were from
            Prague.
            >
            > Oh well, I'm rambling here. There are a few more nuggets of
            wisdom in the Amish cookbook, and I'll post a couple more soon.
            >
            > Kindest regards,
            >
            > Skeeter
            >
            > -------------- Original message from "pmbetty2000" <ewood@...>: ---
            -----------
            >
            > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@ wrote:
            > >
            > > Ahoj!
            > >
            > > I got a new cookbook from Lehman Hardware in Kidron, OH today.
            > >
            > > http://www.lehmans.com/
            > >
            > > They cater to the Amish community, but I positively love the
            > store. At any rate, the cookbook has many simple recipes, and is
            > loaded with little tid-bits of wisdom. I thought I'd share this
            one:
            > >
            > > GOLDEN RULES FOR LIVING
            > > If you open it, close it.
            > > If you turn it on, turn it off.
            > > If you unlock it, lock it up.
            > > If you break it, admit it.
            > > If you can't fix it, call in someone who can.
            > > If you borrow it, return it.
            > > If you value it, take care of it.
            > > If you make a mess, clean it up.
            > > If you move it, put it back.
            > > If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it.
            > > If you don't know how to operate it, leave it alone.
            > > If it's none of your business, don't ask questions.
            > >
            > > Kindest regards,
            > >
            > > Skeeter
            >
            > Skeeter
            > This is a great Quote. In fact these were the rules we raised our
            7
            > children by and they try doing the same with their families. Off
            > this topic, I love your receipes and conversations about the
            slovak
            > foods
            > Regards
            > Eliz
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Robert Pollak
            I saw this one on a T-shirt at a Christian store. Live your life so that the Preacher doe not have to tell lies at your funeral. Bob ... From: fbican@att.net
            Message 5 of 27 , Aug 6, 2008
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              I saw this one on a T-shirt at a Christian store.

              "Live your life so that the Preacher doe not have to tell lies at your funeral."


              Bob
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: fbican@...
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, August 06, 2008 4:09 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Sayings


              Eliz--

              This one is my particular favorite,

              "If you value it, take care of it"

              This is one my dad drilled into my head many years ago. I don't know how many people here are interested in firearms (I know Nick Holcz does), but dad taught me "If you shoot it, clean it before you go to bed". Well, I have followed that rule religiously all my life, and have firearms used regularly that are as much as 50yrs old and still like new.

              Dad spent three years in Europe (France & Germany) during WWII with the US Army. His Army papers were stamped with a big red "PS" stamp, for "possible subversive" because his mother was born in Bratislava. She emmigrated to the US in 1898, at age 8, so I don't know where that would have made dad a subversive. Grandma was high-up at Czeska sin Karlin Hall. My other grandparents were from Prague.

              Oh well, I'm rambling here. There are a few more nuggets of wisdom in the Amish cookbook, and I'll post a couple more soon.

              Kindest regards,

              Skeeter

              -------------- Original message from "pmbetty2000" <ewood@...>: --------------

              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, fbican@... wrote:
              >
              > Ahoj!
              >
              > I got a new cookbook from Lehman Hardware in Kidron, OH today.
              >
              > http://www.lehmans.com/
              >
              > They cater to the Amish community, but I positively love the
              store. At any rate, the cookbook has many simple recipes, and is
              loaded with little tid-bits of wisdom. I thought I'd share this one:
              >
              > GOLDEN RULES FOR LIVING
              > If you open it, close it.
              > If you turn it on, turn it off.
              > If you unlock it, lock it up.
              > If you break it, admit it.
              > If you can't fix it, call in someone who can.
              > If you borrow it, return it.
              > If you value it, take care of it.
              > If you make a mess, clean it up.
              > If you move it, put it back.
              > If it belongs to someone else, get permission to use it.
              > If you don't know how to operate it, leave it alone.
              > If it's none of your business, don't ask questions.
              >
              > Kindest regards,
              >
              > Skeeter

              Skeeter
              This is a great Quote. In fact these were the rules we raised our 7
              children by and they try doing the same with their families. Off
              this topic, I love your receipes and conversations about the slovak
              foods
              Regards
              Eliz
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              __________ NOD32 3318 (20080801) Information __________

              This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
              http://www.eset.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Helen Fedor
              Here are a couple of sayings that caught my eye: Nemies~aj sa ty Pa nu Bohu do remesla. Don t interfere in God s business Pa n Boh je nie na hlivy , ale
              Message 6 of 27 , Apr 7, 2009
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                Here are a couple of sayings that caught my eye:

                "Nemies~aj sa ty Pa'nu Bohu do remesla."
                Don't interfere in God's business

                "Pa'n Boh je nie na'hlivy', ale pama:tlivy'."
                God isn't hasty, but he has a long memory.
                When I was a kid, I heard a version of this when I was bad: "Nezabudz,
                Boh pameta!” In our dialect, “Don’t forget, God remembers (i.e.,
                keeps score).”

                H
              • William C. Wormuth
                Budeme Z~it do smrt i. :0) :0) :0) We re going to live till we die ________________________________ From: Helen Fedor To:
                Message 7 of 27 , Apr 7, 2009
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                  Budeme Z~it do smrt'i. :0) :0) :0)

                  We're going to live 'till we die




                  ________________________________
                  From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, April 7, 2009 11:36:49 AM
                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Sayings


                  Here are a couple of sayings that caught my eye:

                  "Nemies~aj sa ty Pa'nu Bohu do remesla."
                  Don't interfere in God's business

                  "Pa'n Boh je nie na'hlivy', ale pama:tlivy'. "
                  God isn't hasty, but he has a long memory.
                  When I was a kid, I heard a version of this when I was bad: "Nezabudz,
                  Boh pameta!” In our dialect, “Don’t forget, God remembers (i.e.,
                  keeps score).”

                  H






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Martin Votruba
                  ... Perhaps not a particularly memorable one: Martin
                  Message 8 of 27 , Apr 7, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > a couple of sayings that caught my eye:
                    >
                    > "Pa'n Boh je nie na'hlivy', ale pama:tlivy'."

                    Perhaps not a particularly memorable one:

                    <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/message/10211>


                    Martin
                  • William C. Wormuth
                    Martin, There is a 90 year old Lady here in Johnstown, NY who was raised in Kúty. She uses the word PODEGRA where we would normally use POTVORA. I have not
                    Message 9 of 27 , Apr 7, 2009
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                      Martin,
                      There is a 90 year old Lady here in Johnstown, NY who was raised in
                      Kúty. She uses the word PODEGRA where we would normally use POTVORA.
                      I have not been able to find that word in any dictionary or references.
                      I have read various articles in the Zahorak dialect and have never
                      found that word. Have you ever heard of it before?

                      Vilo







                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Martin Votruba
                      ... If she does, Vilo, she s probably confusing _potvora_ with _podagra_, which is an older word for gout. Martin
                      Message 10 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        > uses the word PODEGRA where we would normally use POTVORA.

                        If she does, Vilo, she's probably confusing _potvora_ with _podagra_, which is an older word for "gout."


                        Martin
                      • Helen Fedor
                        Jaj! H ... Perhaps not a particularly memorable one: Martin
                        Message 11 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
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                          Jaj!

                          H



                          >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 4/7/2009 10:27 PM >>>
                          > a couple of sayings that caught my eye:
                          >
                          > "Pa'n Boh je nie na'hlivy', ale pama:tlivy'."

                          Perhaps not a particularly memorable one:

                          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Slovak-World/message/10211>


                          Martin
                        • Ben Sorensen
                          Hey, there s one we haven t had yet! But I think many of us use it daily..... Ben ... From: Helen Fedor Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Sayings To:
                          Message 12 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hey, there's one we haven't had yet! But I think many of us use it daily.....
                            Ben

                            --- On Wed, 4/8/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:


                            From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Sayings
                            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2009, 9:40 AM






                            Jaj!

                            H

                            >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@yahoo. com> 4/7/2009 10:27 PM >>>
                            > a couple of sayings that caught my eye:
                            >
                            > "Pa'n Boh je nie na'hlivy', ale pama:tlivy'. "

                            Perhaps not a particularly memorable one:

                            <http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/Slovak- World/message/ 10211>

                            Martin



















                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • William C. Wormuth
                            Martin, Rozka is as alert and alive as a 70 year old and very active. Her mind is great. Use of the word seems to be integral with her Slovencina. Oh ti
                            Message 13 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
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                              Martin,
                              Rozka is as alert and alive as a 70 year old and very active. Her mind is great. Use of the word seems to be integral with her Slovencina. "Oh ti podegra". Could be a part of older Zahorak dialect. I have some young Slovaks visiting in June and I'll ask them if they use it. It is very iteresting.
                              I am amazed that these dialects have remained in this changing world. The Zahorak has changed but is still spoken but most use standard Slovak when outside of the area. I have often been asked, "where did you learn such old fashioned Zahorak"?
                              Thanks for your answer.
                              Vilo





                              ________________________________
                              From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 7:47:21 AM
                              Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language


                              > uses the word PODEGRA where we would normally use POTVORA.

                              If she does, Vilo, she's probably confusing _potvora_ with _podagra_, which is an older word for "gout."

                              Martin







                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Ben Sorensen
                              Vilo, could she be complaining about what others would call  lamka or reumatizmus? Ben ... From: William C. Wormuth Subject: Re:
                              Message 14 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Vilo,
                                could she be complaining about what others would call  "lamka" or "reumatizmus?"
                                Ben

                                --- On Wed, 4/8/09, William C. Wormuth <senzus@...> wrote:


                                From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@...>
                                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language
                                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2009, 10:27 AM






                                Martin,
                                Rozka is as alert and alive as a 70 year old and very active. Her mind is great. Use of the word seems to be integral with her Slovencina. "Oh ti podegra". Could be a part of older Zahorak dialect. I have some young Slovaks visiting in June and I'll ask them if they use it. It is very iteresting.
                                I am amazed that these dialects have remained in this changing world. The Zahorak has changed but is still spoken but most use standard Slovak when outside of the area. I have often been asked, "where did you learn such old fashioned Zahorak"?
                                Thanks for your answer.
                                Vilo

                                ____________ _________ _________ __
                                From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com>
                                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                                Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 7:47:21 AM
                                Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language

                                > uses the word PODEGRA where we would normally use POTVORA.

                                If she does, Vilo, she's probably confusing _potvora_ with _podagra_, which is an older word for "gout."

                                Martin

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



















                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • William C. Wormuth
                                Ben, NEVER, you wouldn t believe this woman. She looks anacts like she is in her late sixties. She shovels snow all winter ,cooks big dinners for her card
                                Message 15 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
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                                  Ben,
                                  NEVER, you wouldn't believe this woman. She looks anacts like she is in her late sixties. She shovels snow all winter ,cooks big dinners for her card playing friends, etc. She is exactly like her father whom I knew in Slovakia. He was 92 when he died and up to that day was working in the garden (AND I MEAN A SLOVAK GARDEN).

                                  The word is used when I joke with her and she says, "Oh ti podegra", instead of "Oh ti potvora".

                                  Try this for a demo of Zahorak dialect.

                                  http://www.zahorak.sk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=4114&Itemid=185

                                  The other dialectal oddity is the similarity to Czech the Easter dialects are. I don't mea to sound like prof Vilo, these are only observations which interest me. We depend o Marci for the Professor info but every time I mention Zahorak, he laughs out loud. :0) :0) :0)

                                  Vilo












                                  ________________________________
                                  From: Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...>
                                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 11:24:36 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language


                                  Vilo,
                                  could she be complaining about what others would call "lamka" or "reumatizmus? "
                                  Ben

                                  --- On Wed, 4/8/09, William C. Wormuth <senzus@ymail. com> wrote:

                                  From: William C. Wormuth <senzus@ymail. com>
                                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language
                                  To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2009, 10:27 AM

                                  Martin,
                                  Rozka is as alert and alive as a 70 year old and very active. Her mind is great. Use of the word seems to be integral with her Slovencina. "Oh ti podegra". Could be a part of older Zahorak dialect. I have some young Slovaks visiting in June and I'll ask them if they use it. It is very iteresting.
                                  I am amazed that these dialects have remained in this changing world. The Zahorak has changed but is still spoken but most use standard Slovak when outside of the area. I have often been asked, "where did you learn such old fashioned Zahorak"?
                                  Thanks for your answer.
                                  Vilo

                                  ____________ _________ _________ __
                                  From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@yahoo. com>
                                  To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                                  Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 7:47:21 AM
                                  Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language

                                  > uses the word PODEGRA where we would normally use POTVORA.

                                  If she does, Vilo, she's probably confusing _potvora_ with _podagra_, which is an older word for "gout."

                                  Martin

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                                • Martin Votruba
                                  ... There s no upper or lower age limit on mixing up words. ... Sure, the whole dialect can be using a word in a different meaning than its original one. A
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
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                                    > as alert and alive as a 70 year old and very active.
                                    > Her mind is great.

                                    There's no upper or lower age limit on mixing up words.


                                    > Could be a part of older Zahorak dialect.

                                    Sure, the whole dialect can be using a word in a different meaning than its original one. A vast number of Americans of all ages mix up the past tenses of lay and lie. _Podegra_ is not a native Slovak word, nor a native Czech word, it comes from "gout." It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie.


                                    Martin
                                  • William C. Wormuth
                                    Thanks Martin, That clears it up. The Zahorak dialect is spoken in many villages of Jiz~ni Moravou. the differece is the additio of the C~ech R~ . We use Byl
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
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                                      Thanks Martin,
                                      That clears it up.
                                      The Zahorak dialect is spoken in many villages of Jiz~ni Moravou. the differece is the additio of the C~ech "R~". We use Byl (bol) proouced Biu, sem (som) Miua (mila) ad many words from C~ech.
                                      My day is complete, I learned something. Thax again.
                                      Vilo




                                      ________________________________
                                      From: Martin Votruba <votrubam@...>
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 9:47:39 PM
                                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language





                                      > as alert and alive as a 70 year old and very active.
                                      > Her mind is great.

                                      There's no upper or lower age limit on mixing up words.

                                      > Could be a part of older Zahorak dialect.

                                      Sure, the whole dialect can be using a word in a different meaning than its original one. A vast number of Americans of all ages mix up the past tenses of lay and lie. _Podegra_ is not a native Slovak word, nor a native Czech word, it comes from "gout." It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie.

                                      Martin







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                                    • Ben Sorensen
                                      _It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like the plague can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie._   Would
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Apr 8, 2009
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                                        _It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie._
                                         
                                        Would this be akin to the use of "cholera" in Polish?
                                        Ben





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                                      • Helen Fedor
                                        Ukrainian too. A Ukrainian friend told me that you can insult someone in Ukrainian by calling them a stara cholera . H ... _It was occasionally used as a
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Apr 9, 2009
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                                          Ukrainian too. A Ukrainian friend told me that you can insult someone in Ukrainian by calling them a "stara cholera".

                                          H



                                          >> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> 4/9/2009 12:44 AM >>>




                                          _It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie._

                                          Would this be akin to the use of "cholera" in Polish?
                                          Ben

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                                        • Ben Sorensen
                                          In Polish, from what I have heard in the Tatras, is used like we use darn it (or stronger) or, for you and I Helen, sakra. :-) that Ukranian phrase is a
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Apr 9, 2009
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                                            In Polish, from what I have heard in the Tatras, is used like we use "darn it (or stronger)" or, for you and I Helen, "sakra.":-)
                                            that Ukranian phrase is a bit sharp, though, isn't it?
                                            Ben

                                            --- On Thu, 4/9/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:


                                            From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                                            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language
                                            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Thursday, April 9, 2009, 10:10 AM








                                            Ukrainian too. A Ukrainian friend told me that you can insult someone in Ukrainian by calling them a "stara cholera".

                                            H



                                            >> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 4/9/2009 12:44 AM >>>




                                            _It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie._

                                            Would this be akin to the use of "cholera" in Polish?
                                            Ben

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                                          • Helen Fedor
                                            Yes, although my friend told me that it can also be used in a joking way between old friends too (or an old married couple...but we won t go there). H ... In
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Apr 9, 2009
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                                              Yes, although my friend told me that it can also be used in a joking way between old friends too (or an old married couple...but we won't go there).

                                              H



                                              >>> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> 4/9/2009 10:19:47 AM >>>
                                              In Polish, from what I have heard in the Tatras, is used like we use "darn it (or stronger)" or, for you and I Helen, "sakra.":-)
                                              that Ukranian phrase is a bit sharp, though, isn't it?
                                              Ben

                                              --- On Thu, 4/9/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:


                                              From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                                              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language
                                              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                              Date: Thursday, April 9, 2009, 10:10 AM








                                              Ukrainian too. A Ukrainian friend told me that you can insult someone in Ukrainian by calling them a "stara cholera".

                                              H



                                              >> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 4/9/2009 12:44 AM >>>




                                              _It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie._

                                              Would this be akin to the use of "cholera" in Polish?
                                              Ben

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                                            • Ron Matviyak
                                              sakra is also unsed in Germany, though not often. I never questioned the proper or improper usage of the term, but took it (and may have heard) sakrament .
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Apr 9, 2009
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                                                "sakra" is also unsed in Germany, though not often. I never questioned the proper or improper usage of the term, but took it (and may have heard) 'sakrament'. Considering the rarity and the circumstances, I took its use as the beginning of a blasphemy, if I remember my catechism terminology correctly.

                                                Ron
                                                sitting on a volcano in Hawaii . . .

                                                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > In Polish, from what I have heard in the Tatras, is used like we use "darn it (or stronger)" or, for you and I Helen, "sakra.":-)
                                                > that Ukranian phrase is a bit sharp, though, isn't it?
                                                > Ben
                                                >
                                                > --- On Thu, 4/9/09, Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > From: Helen Fedor <hfed@...>
                                                > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Slovak Language
                                                > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                > Date: Thursday, April 9, 2009, 10:10 AM
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                                                > Ukrainian too. A Ukrainian friend told me that you can insult someone in Ukrainian by calling them a "stara cholera".
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                                                > H
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                                                > >> Ben Sorensen <cerrunos1@yahoo. com> 4/9/2009 12:44 AM >>>
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                                                > _It was occasionally used as a derogatory word in Czech, just like "the plague" can be in English, and could have easily spilled over to Zahorie._
                                                >
                                                > Would this be akin to the use of "cholera" in Polish?
                                                > Ben
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                                              • Martin Votruba
                                                ... In line with what Ron says: it entered Czech from German. It was uncommon in Slovak until the recent deluge of foreign movies dubbed into Czech brought it
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Apr 9, 2009
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                                                  > "sakra" is also unsed in Germany, though not often.

                                                  In line with what Ron says: it entered Czech from German. It was uncommon in Slovak until the recent deluge of foreign movies dubbed into Czech brought it in.

                                                  Martin
                                                • Vladimir Linder
                                                  Sakra is a Czech word and it was used in Slovakia way back in the 60 s when I lived there. Vladi
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Apr 9, 2009
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                                                    Sakra is a Czech word and it was used in Slovakia way back in the
                                                    60's when I lived there.

                                                    Vladi

                                                    At 01:45 PM 4/9/2009, you wrote:


                                                    > > "sakra" is also unsed in Germany, though not often.
                                                    >
                                                    >In line with what Ron says: it entered Czech from German. It was
                                                    >uncommon in Slovak until the recent deluge of foreign movies dubbed
                                                    >into Czech brought it in.
                                                    >
                                                    >Martin
                                                    >
                                                    >
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