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Bach?

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  • Eve Smith
    Skeeter! I am quite impressed - you had mentioned playing Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, my favorite and no easy piece to play. Were you ever a church
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 2, 2008
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      Skeeter! I am quite impressed - you had mentioned playing Toccata and Fugue
      in D Minor, my favorite and no easy piece to play. Were you ever a church
      organist? I took lessons for awhile on organ and then for a short time on
      pipe organ, miss it.

      Also someone mentioned Baltimore as an immigration point. Are those records
      on line or available anyplace? Maybe that's where my Slovak grandparents
      entered (the mystery people). Everything is findable on my Hungarian
      grandparents through Catholic church records (kept by the Mormons) even back
      in Hungary and Ellis Island.

      Helen, I love the sayings you post.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • fbican@att.net
      Eve-- Thank you for the compliment. I ve always considered Bach s Tocatta & Fugue in D-Minor as the pinnacle of organ music. My dad got a Hammond C3
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 3, 2008
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        Eve--

        Thank you for the compliment. I've always considered Bach's Tocatta & Fugue in D-Minor as the pinnacle of organ music. My dad got a Hammond C3 two-manual church organ in their living room in 1959, and I took lessons on it for 11 years. I've never performed in church, but I did get to play a pipe organ once. It was a Wurlitzer three-manual pipe organ that was slavaged from an old roller-skating rink and relocaed to a restaurant (all long gone). I built a Vox Jaguar organ from a Heath-kit in 1968, one of the first keyboards, and played in a polka band ("The Royal Tones") at lots of wedding receptions (mostly Slovak and Italian), and they paid us well and fed us well. Now, I'm trying to get back into it with a Yamaha PSR-330 keyboard. It was inexpensive ($150) and has surprisingly good sound. Along the way, I've owned four different guitars, but I no longer have much interest in the guitar. I sold all of them.

        My dad was also big on the accordian and the concertina. My Slovak buddy still has both of them, and he's getting back into polkas as well.

        Music was a big part of my herritage, but, like many of the foods, (chlebova polevka v kohlrabi for dinner tonight), I think it might be fading away. They only thing my nephews are interested in playing is an iPod.

        Kindest regards,

        Skeeter

        -------------- Original message from "Eve Smith" <esmith93580@...>: --------------



        Skeeter! I am quite impressed - you had mentioned playing Toccata and Fugue
        in D Minor, my favorite and no easy piece to play. Were you ever a church
        organist? I took lessons for awhile on organ and then for a short time on
        pipe organ, miss it.

        Also someone mentioned Baltimore as an immigration point. Are those records
        on line or available anyplace? Maybe that's where my Slovak grandparents
        entered (the mystery people). Everything is findable on my Hungarian
        grandparents through Catholic church records (kept by the Mormons) even back
        in Hungary and Ellis Island.

        Helen, I love the sayings you post.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • fbican@att.net
        Nick, et. al.-- The last concert I took my late father to was a performance of Saint-Saens third Symphonie ( The organ symphony )
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 4, 2008
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          Nick, et. al.--

          The last concert I took my late father to was a performance of Saint-Saens third Symphonie ("The organ symphony")

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._3_(Saint-Sa%C3%ABns)

          at the refurbished Severance Hall in Cleveland

          http://www.clevelandorch.com/html/Severance/SevHistory.asp

          As part of the restoration, they took the pipes out from hidden behind a wall, and put them prominently along the back wall of the stage. Dad was so thrilled, he was disappointed when it ended.

          I've also attended a number of recitals at Kulas auditorium at Baldwin-Wallace College

          http://www.bw.edu/academics/conservatory/about/

          where they also have a fiarly good pipe organ.

          Cleveland, like most of the "rust-belt" cities, may have it's problems, but fine food and culture are not among them.

          Kindest regards,

          Skeeter




          -------------- Original message from Nick Holcz <nickh@...>: --------------


          > Skeeter, I am far from being an expert but we went to a small (
          > audience numbers) recital by Roger Woodward and he talked about
          > everything he played and I can remember him saying that fugues were
          > written for harpsichords. I love the sound of a harpsichord and pipe
          > organs. We were so lucky with the world famous artists who came to
          > the little town ( 10,000 people) and also the small amount of people
          > who attended.
          > I remember one of my friends at school who played the pipe organ in
          > the school chapel playing some pop tune and it made me realize how
          > good an instrument they are.
          > Lurch from the Addams's family plays the harpsichord (maybe).
          >
          > regards
          > Nick


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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