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Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

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  • fbican@att.net
    If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I ve done it many times), this is where I get my supplies: http://www.leeners.com/cheesemaking.html It s
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 2, 2008
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      If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times), this is where I get my supplies:

      http://www.leeners.com/cheesemaking.html

      It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.

      Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.

      šťastný jedenie,

      Skeeter

      -------------- Original message from Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@...>: --------------

      Folks,

      For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.

      Paul Wolsko

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Margo Smith
      Hey, Skeeter   Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk?  Does cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hey, Skeeter

        Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk?� Does cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?

        Margo

        --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

        From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM






        If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times), this is where I get my supplies:

        http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html

        It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.

        Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.

        ��astn� jedenie,

        Skeeter

        ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko <pwolsko@optonline. net>: ------------ --

        Folks,

        For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.

        Paul Wolsko

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • fbican@att.net
        Margot-- I haven t tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow s milk. I ve only tried making cheese with whole
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Margot--

          I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

          Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth-lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

          I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

          Kindest regards,

          Skeeter

          -------------- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@...>: --------------


          > Hey, Skeeter
          > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
          > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
          >
          > Margo
          >
          > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
          >
          > From: fbican@...
          > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
          > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
          > this is where I get my supplies:
          >
          > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
          > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
          > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
          >
          > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
          >
          > ¹»astný jedenie,
          >
          > Skeeter
          >
          > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
          > ------------ --
          >
          > Folks,
          >
          > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
          > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
          > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
          > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
          > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
          >
          > Paul Wolsko
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John Polko
          I would like to post my mother s recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don t
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

            Regards,

            John e. Polko
            -----Original Message-----
            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
            Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese


            Margot--

            I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

            Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth-lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

            I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

            Kindest regards,

            Skeeter

            -------------- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@...>: --------------

            > Hey, Skeeter
            > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
            > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
            >
            > Margo
            >
            > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
            >
            > From: fbican@...
            > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
            > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
            > this is where I get my supplies:
            >
            > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
            > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
            > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
            >
            > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
            >
            > ¹»astný jedenie,
            >
            > Skeeter
            >
            > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
            > ------------ --
            >
            > Folks,
            >
            > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
            > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
            > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
            > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
            > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
            >
            > Paul Wolsko
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Caye Caswick
              Based on what I ve learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
               
              Based on what I've learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who can actually tell where a cow (or sheep/goat) was from by the taste of it's cheese.
               
               
              Caye


              --- On Thu, 7/3/08, John Polko <johnpolko@...> wrote:

              From: John Polko <johnpolko@...>
              Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 10:06 PM






              I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

              Regards,

              John e. Polko
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
              Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

              Margot--

              I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

              Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth- lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

              I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

              Kindest regards,

              Skeeter

              ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

              > Hey, Skeeter
              > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
              > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
              >
              > Margo
              >
              > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
              >
              > From: fbican@...
              > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
              > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
              > this is where I get my supplies:
              >
              > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
              > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
              > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
              >
              > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
              >
              > ¹»astný jedenie,
              >
              > Skeeter
              >
              > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
              > ------------ --
              >
              > Folks,
              >
              > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
              > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
              > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
              > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
              > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
              >
              > Paul Wolsko
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > ------------ --------- --------- ------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Nick Holcz
              John, easiest way is to put in an email. waiting hopefully Nick
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                John, easiest way is to put in an email.

                waiting hopefully

                Nick
              • fbican@att.net
                John and all, I ll be happy to share whatever knowledge I have with anyone here regarding links and posts. I spent 30 years working in Information Technology,
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  John and all,

                  I'll be happy to share whatever knowledge I have with anyone here regarding links and posts. I spent 30 years working in Information Technology, and I'd like to pass whatever I know to whomever wants it.

                  For what it's worth, I'm currently running a Windows Vista-SP1 system with a 64x2 dual core-processor system connected by a wireless DSL router, USB scanner, a couple of digital cameras, and a backup hard drive, so I think I'm still a bit computer savvy. Any help I can offer, to anyone, don't hesitate to ask. I'm also fluent in VMS, but I don't know anything about Apple MacIntoshes.

                  If you'd not rather ask publicly, send me a private message at fbican@..., and I'll get back to you.

                  Just cleaned up the computer registry, emptied the recycle bin, ran SpyBot and AVG, so I think tonight might be a good night to make a fresh backup. I usually start it and just go to bed. I'm old-fashiioned and run the old DOS command "xcopy c:\*.* f:\*.* /u/s/c/y/h". There are fancier things out there, but it's free, and how my Swiss buddy backs up his business every day.

                  Kindest regards,

                  Skeeter

                  -------------- Original message from "John Polko" <johnpolko@...>: --------------

                  I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

                  Regards,

                  John e. Polko
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
                  Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

                  Margot--

                  I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

                  Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth-lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

                  I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

                  Kindest regards,

                  Skeeter

                  -------------- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@...>: --------------

                  > Hey, Skeeter
                  > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
                  > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
                  >
                  > Margo
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
                  >
                  > From: fbican@...
                  > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                  > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
                  > this is where I get my supplies:
                  >
                  > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
                  > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
                  > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
                  >
                  > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
                  >
                  > ¹»astný jedenie,
                  >
                  > Skeeter
                  >
                  > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
                  > ------------ --
                  >
                  > Folks,
                  >
                  > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
                  > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
                  > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
                  > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
                  > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
                  >
                  > Paul Wolsko
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • fbican@att.net
                  Oh, I have no doubt about that. I ve just had good luck with Amish cows milk. I think their cows are largely range-fed. It s worked for me. Much better
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 3, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Oh, I have no doubt about that. I've just had good luck with Amish cows milk. I think their cows are largely range-fed. It's worked for me. Much better that than the stuff shipped in from half-way across the country, and who know knows what they were fed? I'm sticking with the Amish cows milk for the time being.

                    Kindest regards,

                    Skeeter

                    -------------- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>: --------------


                    Based on what I've learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who can actually tell where a cow (or sheep/goat) was from by the taste of it's cheese.


                    Caye

                    --- On Thu, 7/3/08, John Polko <johnpolko@...> wrote:

                    From: John Polko <johnpolko@...>
                    Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                    To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 10:06 PM

                    I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

                    Regards,

                    John e. Polko
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
                    Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
                    To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

                    Margot--

                    I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

                    Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth- lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

                    I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

                    Kindest regards,

                    Skeeter

                    ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                    > Hey, Skeeter
                    > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
                    > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
                    >
                    > Margo
                    >
                    > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
                    >
                    > From: fbican@...
                    > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                    > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                    > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
                    > this is where I get my supplies:
                    >
                    > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
                    > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
                    > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
                    >
                    > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
                    >
                    > ¹»astný jedenie,
                    >
                    > Skeeter
                    >
                    > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
                    > ------------ --
                    >
                    > Folks,
                    >
                    > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
                    > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
                    > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
                    > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
                    > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
                    >
                    > Paul Wolsko
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Margo Smith
                    Sounds delicious!   I grew up in New York and vividly recall how the flavor of milk changed in the spring when the cows shifted from a winter diet of whatever
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 4, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Sounds delicious!
                       
                      I grew up in New York and vividly recall how the flavor of milk changed in the spring when the cows shifted from a winter diet of whatever they eat then to grass pasture.  In SK, all the cows and sheep I saw were in pastures.
                       
                      In fact, for all the cow cheese, bryndza, meat, and sausages I saw in SK in Tesco, I saw few very few cows and sheep.  There were a number of home-made signs along the road advertising bryndze for sale -- but I never saw the animals.
                       
                      Margo

                      --- On Thu, 7/3/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                      From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 11:47 PM






                      Oh, I have no doubt about that. I've just had good luck with Amish cows milk. I think their cows are largely range-fed. It's worked for me. Much better that than the stuff shipped in from half-way across the country, and who know knows what they were fed? I'm sticking with the Amish cows milk for the time being.

                      Kindest regards,

                      Skeeter

                      ------------ -- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>: ------------ --

                      Based on what I've learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who can actually tell where a cow (or sheep/goat) was from by the taste of it's cheese.


                      Caye

                      --- On Thu, 7/3/08, John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com> wrote:

                      From: John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com>
                      Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                      Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 10:06 PM

                      I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

                      Regards,

                      John e. Polko
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak- World@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
                      Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
                      To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

                      Margot--

                      I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

                      Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth- lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

                      I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

                      Kindest regards,

                      Skeeter

                      ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                      > Hey, Skeeter
                      > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
                      > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
                      >
                      > Margo
                      >
                      > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
                      >
                      > From: fbican@...
                      > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                      > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                      > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
                      > this is where I get my supplies:
                      >
                      > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
                      > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
                      > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
                      >
                      > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
                      >
                      > ¹»astný jedenie,
                      >
                      > Skeeter
                      >
                      > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
                      > ------------ --
                      >
                      > Folks,
                      >
                      > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
                      > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
                      > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
                      > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
                      > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
                      >
                      > Paul Wolsko
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • fbican@att.net
                      Margo-- It is much better than the usual dairy milk. I ve been down there many times, and they truly are grass-fed cows. I ve never bought anything else
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 4, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Margo--

                        It is much better than the usual dairy milk. I've been down there many times, and they truly are grass-fed cows. I've never bought anything else since.

                        Here's another thought for everyone. My friend brought me some dill from his garden, and after I put it in the dessicator, it reduced to about two tablespoons. I went out and picked my basil and cilantro before they could bolt, and I'll be puting them in the dessicator tonight (the dessicant packs are "refreshing" in the oven right now). Mix them all together, and I think it will make a great herb "malange". Yes, I know I'm slightly nuts, but it sounds like a good mixture to me.

                        Kindest regards,

                        Skeeter

                        -------------- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@...>: --------------

                        Sounds delicious!

                        I grew up in New York and vividly recall how the flavor of milk changed in the spring when the cows shifted from a winter diet of whatever they eat then to grass pasture. In SK, all the cows and sheep I saw were in pastures.

                        In fact, for all the cow cheese, bryndza, meat, and sausages I saw in SK in Tesco, I saw few very few cows and sheep. There were a number of home-made signs along the road advertising bryndze for sale -- but I never saw the animals.

                        Margo

                        --- On Thu, 7/3/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                        From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 11:47 PM

                        Oh, I have no doubt about that. I've just had good luck with Amish cows milk. I think their cows are largely range-fed. It's worked for me. Much better that than the stuff shipped in from half-way across the country, and who know knows what they were fed? I'm sticking with the Amish cows milk for the time being.

                        Kindest regards,

                        Skeeter

                        ------------ -- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>: ------------ --

                        Based on what I've learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who can actually tell where a cow (or sheep/goat) was from by the taste of it's cheese.

                        Caye

                        --- On Thu, 7/3/08, John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com> wrote:

                        From: John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com>
                        Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 10:06 PM

                        I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

                        Regards,

                        John e. Polko
                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak- World@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
                        Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
                        To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

                        Margot--

                        I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

                        Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth- lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

                        I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

                        Kindest regards,

                        Skeeter

                        ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                        > Hey, Skeeter
                        > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
                        > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
                        >
                        > Margo
                        >
                        > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
                        >
                        > From: fbican@...
                        > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                        > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                        > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
                        > this is where I get my supplies:
                        >
                        > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
                        > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
                        > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
                        >
                        > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
                        >
                        > ¹»astný jedenie,
                        >
                        > Skeeter
                        >
                        > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
                        > ------------ --
                        >
                        > Folks,
                        >
                        > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
                        > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
                        > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
                        > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
                        > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
                        >
                        > Paul Wolsko
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Caye Caswick
                        Hey Skeeter: Basically you are creating Herbs de Provance -- a blend of herbs -- there is a traditional French blend recipe, but in a very generic form, it s a
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 5, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Hey Skeeter:

                          Basically you are creating Herbs de Provance -- a blend of herbs -- there is a traditional French blend recipe, but in a very generic form, it's a mix of various herbs.


                          Caye


                          --- On Fri, 7/4/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                          From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Friday, July 4, 2008, 5:13 PM






                          Margo--

                          It is much better than the usual dairy milk. I've been down there many times, and they truly are grass-fed cows. I've never bought anything else since.

                          Here's another thought for everyone. My friend brought me some dill from his garden, and after I put it in the dessicator, it reduced to about two tablespoons. I went out and picked my basil and cilantro before they could bolt, and I'll be puting them in the dessicator tonight (the dessicant packs are "refreshing" in the oven right now). Mix them all together, and I think it will make a great herb "malange". Yes, I know I'm slightly nuts, but it sounds like a good mixture to me.

                          Kindest regards,

                          Skeeter

                          ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                          Sounds delicious!

                          I grew up in New York and vividly recall how the flavor of milk changed in the spring when the cows shifted from a winter diet of whatever they eat then to grass pasture. In SK, all the cows and sheep I saw were in pastures.

                          In fact, for all the cow cheese, bryndza, meat, and sausages I saw in SK in Tesco, I saw few very few cows and sheep. There were a number of home-made signs along the road advertising bryndze for sale -- but I never saw the animals.

                          Margo

                          --- On Thu, 7/3/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                          From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                          Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 11:47 PM

                          Oh, I have no doubt about that. I've just had good luck with Amish cows milk. I think their cows are largely range-fed. It's worked for me. Much better that than the stuff shipped in from half-way across the country, and who know knows what they were fed? I'm sticking with the Amish cows milk for the time being.

                          Kindest regards,

                          Skeeter

                          ------------ -- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>: ------------ --

                          Based on what I've learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who can actually tell where a cow (or sheep/goat) was from by the taste of it's cheese.

                          Caye

                          --- On Thu, 7/3/08, John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com> wrote:

                          From: John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com>
                          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                          Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 10:06 PM

                          I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

                          Regards,

                          John e. Polko
                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak- World@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
                          Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
                          To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

                          Margot--

                          I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

                          Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth- lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

                          I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

                          Kindest regards,

                          Skeeter

                          ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                          > Hey, Skeeter
                          > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
                          > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
                          >
                          > Margo
                          >
                          > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
                          >
                          > From: fbican@...
                          > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                          > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                          > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
                          > this is where I get my supplies:
                          >
                          > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
                          > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
                          > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
                          >
                          > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
                          >
                          > ¹»astný jedenie,
                          >
                          > Skeeter
                          >
                          > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
                          > ------------ --
                          >
                          > Folks,
                          >
                          > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
                          > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
                          > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
                          > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
                          > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
                          >
                          > Paul Wolsko
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • fbican@att.net
                          Thanks, Caye-- I fail to see how a mix of dill, basil, and cilantro could possilby ruin anything. I might add some sea salt and maybe some cerny pepper. If
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 5, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Thanks, Caye--

                            I fail to see how a mix of dill, basil, and cilantro could possilby ruin anything. I might add some sea salt and maybe some cerny pepper. If anyone thinks I'm wrong, please let me know soon, because I'll probably blend it up in the next couple of days. I'm no chef, but thanks to my Czechoslovak mother and grandmothers, I'm a halfways-decent cook.

                            As an aside, I still have two of my grandmom's captain's kitchen chairs, one in the family room, one in the living room. Grandma Rose Toman was a large (but not tall) woman, >300lbs, and spent most of her time in the kitchen. Well, those chairs held up to her weight, and they're still strong after at least 60 years. There's no maker's mark or date on them, but they made them strong back then.

                            Kindest regards,

                            Skeeter

                            -------------- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>: --------------


                            Hey Skeeter:

                            Basically you are creating Herbs de Provance -- a blend of herbs -- there is a traditional French blend recipe, but in a very generic form, it's a mix of various herbs.

                            Caye

                            --- On Fri, 7/4/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                            From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Friday, July 4, 2008, 5:13 PM

                            Margo--

                            It is much better than the usual dairy milk. I've been down there many times, and they truly are grass-fed cows. I've never bought anything else since.

                            Here's another thought for everyone. My friend brought me some dill from his garden, and after I put it in the dessicator, it reduced to about two tablespoons. I went out and picked my basil and cilantro before they could bolt, and I'll be puting them in the dessicator tonight (the dessicant packs are "refreshing" in the oven right now). Mix them all together, and I think it will make a great herb "malange". Yes, I know I'm slightly nuts, but it sounds like a good mixture to me.

                            Kindest regards,

                            Skeeter

                            ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                            Sounds delicious!

                            I grew up in New York and vividly recall how the flavor of milk changed in the spring when the cows shifted from a winter diet of whatever they eat then to grass pasture. In SK, all the cows and sheep I saw were in pastures.

                            In fact, for all the cow cheese, bryndza, meat, and sausages I saw in SK in Tesco, I saw few very few cows and sheep. There were a number of home-made signs along the road advertising bryndze for sale -- but I never saw the animals.

                            Margo

                            --- On Thu, 7/3/08, fbican@... <fbican@...> wrote:

                            From: fbican@... <fbican@...>
                            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                            Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 11:47 PM

                            Oh, I have no doubt about that. I've just had good luck with Amish cows milk. I think their cows are largely range-fed. It's worked for me. Much better that than the stuff shipped in from half-way across the country, and who know knows what they were fed? I'm sticking with the Amish cows milk for the time being.

                            Kindest regards,

                            Skeeter

                            ------------ -- Original message from Caye Caswick <ccaswick@yahoo. com>: ------------ --

                            Based on what I've learned on The Food Channel and PBS, the flavor of cheeses comes from what the animals eat -- there are some cheese connasewers (LOL) who can actually tell where a cow (or sheep/goat) was from by the taste of it's cheese.

                            Caye

                            --- On Thu, 7/3/08, John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com> wrote:

                            From: John Polko <johnpolko@rogers. com>
                            Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                            Date: Thursday, July 3, 2008, 10:06 PM

                            I would like to post my mother's recipe for cream of sauerkraut soup with Slovak dried mushrooms. I think they are called hribke. The problem is that I don't know how to post it onlilne. Its a great soup to make for those who don't eat meat on Christmas Eve. If anyone can give me detailed instructions on how to post, I would be more than happy to share this wonderful dish with everyone.

                            Regards,

                            John e. Polko
                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:Slovak- World@ yahoogroups. com]On Behalf Of fbican@...
                            Sent: July 3, 2008 9:50 PM
                            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese

                            Margot--

                            I haven't tried goat or sheep milk yet. The only thing we can get around here is Amish-farmed cow's milk. I've only tried making cheese with whole milk, not low-fat or skim. I've just always thought the extra fat in whole milk would make for better cheese. The trip to Amish country is a good 120 mile round trip, and with the price of gas being what it is, I probably won't be going there anytime soon.

                            Still, cheesemaking is easy. You only have to heat the milk up to ~110F, so it's not as scary as heating up a quart of oil to 375F to make French-fries. Add the rennet, some salt, calcium chloride, annotto oil (if you want orange color), the appropriate culture, and put the curds in a cheesecloth- lined collandar for a couple of hours. After that, into the cheesepress for another few hours. Wrap it up (I have a vacuum sealer, but "zip-lock" bags work well, too. Let the cheese "ripen" for a couple of weeks, and that's it! Total cost for a pound of good cheese? Probably around $2, and that's only because I only make small batches. 1Qt to 1/2Gal at a time.

                            I don't know if you can make your own bryndza, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could. Some cheeses, like Bleu and Roquefort require a particular fungal "infection" that I can't do here.

                            Kindest regards,

                            Skeeter

                            ------------ -- Original message from Margo Smith <margolane61@ yahoo.com>: ------------ --

                            > Hey, Skeeter
                            > Have you given any thought to making bryndza from the Amish sheep milk? Does
                            > cheese have a different flavor if made from different species of sheep?
                            >
                            > Margo
                            >
                            > --- On Wed, 7/2/08, fbican@... wrote:
                            >
                            > From: fbican@...
                            > Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Cheese
                            > To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                            > Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 8:17 PM
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > If anyone is inclined to try making their own cheese (I've done it many times),
                            > this is where I get my supplies:
                            >
                            > http://www.leeners com/cheesemaking .html
                            > It's not far from where I live, but they ship all over the US (at least). Making cheese is surprinsingly easy, and a fun project to make with the kids. So far, I've only used whole cows milk and made hard cheeses. I did splurge on a good cheese press, but everything else I already had in the kitchen. Next time I head down to Amish farm country, I'll have to see if they have some goat or sheep
                            > milk. Probably will, and I've never seen it in a grocery store in Cleveland.
                            >
                            > Anyway, cheesemaking is an easy and inexpensive project.
                            >
                            > ¹»astný jedenie,
                            >
                            > Skeeter
                            >
                            > ------------ -- Original message from Paul Wolsko :
                            > ------------ --
                            >
                            > Folks,
                            >
                            > For any of you in the New Jersey area, there's a HUGE ethnic market, Corrado's
                            > in Clifton. Quite an amazing place. I bought fresh Bulgarian Feta there for
                            > $4.39/lb - tastes a lot better than the gas I buy for the same price! But it's
                            > an amazing store. I should say a small city, since the place comprises a few
                            > city blocks. Largest cheese shop I've ever seen in my life.
                            >
                            > Paul Wolsko
                            >
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                            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >

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