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_Jozef Mak_ 5 & 6

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  • durisek
    Back to the world of Mak... Ch. 5 and 6 advance Jozo s life considerably. One annoying feature of this story is that people don t just speak their minds,
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2008
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      Back to the world of Mak...
      Ch. 5 and 6 advance Jozo's life considerably. One annoying feature of this story is that people don't just speak their minds, establish relationships directly. Instead, they're quiet even though they have a lot to say.... Here Jozef kind of slithers away into the woods and gets outta town. He meets the lumberjacks and works with them, most notably Gregor Bialos, who helps Jozo when his ankle is injured. They're telling stories about Janosik, and get Jozo to tell them stories by holding him over a fire.
      When they go back to town, they discover that the godmother has died. His mother tells him, but there is a note it's as if she's asking 'where can I go now?", and that Jozef didn't understand her because he couldn't believe she was alive. Why can't these people just say what they mean? Like: Mom, I thought it was you who died", or Jozo, I'm worried about what I can do now that your godmother has passed away. With so few words, why hem and haw and avoid? Is that representative of Slovak interactions, to not speak out but rather internalize things? Not a very good communicator. Three times he should say something to is sweetheart Marusa... first, *almost* loud enough for her to hear at the door when the godmother's funeral procession emerges, 2nd eyes meet in love, 3rd she's crying on his shoulder and leaves, after which he calls her name into the darkness. What's wrong with that boy?
      Then, as Jozef heads back to the hills after almost forgetting to say goodbye to her, his mother asks if he knows Gregor Bialos "He's a master of everything" she says, just so Jozo can hear...Soap opera moment.... (Wonder who Jozo's father is???).
      Stay tuned!


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Helen Fedor
      Thanks for these summaries, Zuzka. Things have suddenly gotten busy here at work, but I m trying to keep up, reading both the English and the Slovak. I ve
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 2, 2008
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        Thanks for these summaries, Zuzka. Things have suddenly gotten busy here at work, but I'm trying to keep up, reading both the English and the Slovak.

        I've gotten pretty annoyed at him myself. It's like he's drifting through his life, not living it. He doesn't seem to take much genuine joy in anything once he grows up.

        Two things caught my attention. Jozo's mother tells him that she's saved some of his earnings: "...I;ve deposited seven and a half ducats from your earnings at the parsonage. The reverend Father won't tell anyone about the money--but I wanted you to know." IN small villages was the village priest used as a money holder?

        After the funeral, Jozo buys some bread and bacon "at the Jew's tavern". In small villages, did taverns serve as rudimentary stores? Were taverns and other business commonly run by Jews?

        H




        >>> "durisek" <durisek@...> 7/1/2008 3:58 PM >>>
        Back to the world of Mak...
        Ch. 5 and 6 advance Jozo's life considerably. One annoying feature of this story is that people don't just speak their minds, establish relationships directly. Instead, they're quiet even though they have a lot to say.... Here Jozef kind of slithers away into the woods and gets outta town. He meets the lumberjacks and works with them, most notably Gregor Bialos, who helps Jozo when his ankle is injured. They're telling stories about Janosik, and get Jozo to tell them stories by holding him over a fire.
        When they go back to town, they discover that the godmother has died. His mother tells him, but there is a note it's as if she's asking 'where can I go now?", and that Jozef didn't understand her because he couldn't believe she was alive. Why can't these people just say what they mean? Like: Mom, I thought it was you who died", or Jozo, I'm worried about what I can do now that your godmother has passed away. With so few words, why hem and haw and avoid? Is that representative of Slovak interactions, to not speak out but rather internalize things? Not a very good communicator. Three times he should say something to is sweetheart Marusa... first, *almost* loud enough for her to hear at the door when the godmother's funeral procession emerges, 2nd eyes meet in love, 3rd she's crying on his shoulder and leaves, after which he calls her name into the darkness. What's wrong with that boy?
        Then, as Jozef heads back to the hills after almost forgetting to say goodbye to her, his mother asks if he knows Gregor Bialos "He's a master of everything" she says, just so Jozo can hear...Soap opera moment.... (Wonder who Jozo's father is???).
        Stay tuned!


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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