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Re: [Slovak-World] Learning the Slovak Language

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  • Ben Sorensen
    ... I still get picked on about that. Zuzka, we should do something musically.... :-) Ben ... From: durisek Subject: [Slovak-World]
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 1 6:16 AM
      :-) Don't feel bad, my first time with a mosquito comment I said that the "kominari" were horrendous... kominar being a chimney-sweep...
      :-)
      I still get picked on about that.
      Zuzka, we should do something musically.... :-)
      Ben

      --- On Tue, 7/1/08, durisek <durisek@...> wrote:

      From: durisek <durisek@...>
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Learning the Slovak Language
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 3:10 PM






      It is interesting to me how language starts to become automatic, as Ben describes. You realize, after a time, it just comes to you. I'm a piano teacher, and I see it all the time. Although learning to play a piece also involves doing something with more of your body...moving fingers across keys... there comes a time when you can just do it automatically. Even more fascinating, I find that the learning curve isn't a straight line, and that improvement sometimes comes after a break... as if a good night's sleep allows info to assemble for an improved play-through, rather than keeping going for hours on end.
      Learning language in an immersion environment allows that... Now I see the wisdom in my grandma learning English by watching daily soap-operas. .. although she did also develop a dramatic flair.... which begs the question about nature or nurture.
      When I first heard full conversations in Slovak, the speakers were usually women whose words flowed in an almost continuous lilting stream for minutes at a time, stopping only for a breath. I couldn't tell where one word ended and the next began! I had an aha! moment when I got to the level of being able to identify individual words in the stream.... then to begin to understand the gist of what was being said.... then a lot... Thats when a dictionary began to be helpful for the odd words.... and then some info on why the word endings changed, which is more the formal grammar.... and now am trying to figure out how to discern a bad translation and also subtle humor.
      Still, there are moments... like when I slapped a mosquito on my arm, and said 'komarno', and my Slovak friends sitting around ROTFL.
      Zuzka D.

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    • fbican@att.net
      Although learning to play a piece also involves doing something with more of your body...moving fingers across keys... there comes a time when you can just do
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1 7:00 AM
        "Although learning to play a piece also involves doing something with more of your body...moving fingers across keys... there comes a time when you can just do it automatically."

        That's a good analogy. When I was young, I could play Bach's Tocatta & Fuge in D-minor from memory on the dad's church organ. I'm attempting to re-learn it now on a Yamaha keyboard. I've still got some learning to do. It's a little harder on a keyboard than a dual-manual + full pedal organ, but I'll get to it.

        Same thing for language. Every now and then, I scare myself with what little bits of Czech, Slovak, German, French, and Spanish that I remember.

        Kindest regards,

        Skeeter

        -------------- Original message from "durisek" <durisek@...>: --------------

        It is interesting to me how language starts to become automatic, as Ben describes. You realize, after a time, it just comes to you. I'm a piano teacher, and I see it all the time. Although learning to play a piece also involves doing something with more of your body...moving fingers across keys... there comes a time when you can just do it automatically. Even more fascinating, I find that the learning curve isn't a straight line, and that improvement sometimes comes after a break... as if a good night's sleep allows info to assemble for an improved play-through, rather than keeping going for hours on end.
        Learning language in an immersion environment allows that... Now I see the wisdom in my grandma learning English by watching daily soap-operas... although she did also develop a dramatic flair.... which begs the question about nature or nurture.
        When I first heard full conversations in Slovak, the speakers were usually women whose words flowed in an almost continuous lilting stream for minutes at a time, stopping only for a breath. I couldn't tell where one word ended and the next began! I had an aha! moment when I got to the level of being able to identify individual words in the stream.... then to begin to understand the gist of what was being said.... then a lot... Thats when a dictionary began to be helpful for the odd words.... and then some info on why the word endings changed, which is more the formal grammar.... and now am trying to figure out how to discern a bad translation and also subtle humor.
        Still, there are moments... like when I slapped a mosquito on my arm, and said 'komarno', and my Slovak friends sitting around ROTFL.
        Zuzka D.

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