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Re: Bryndza

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  • bike_for_life2003
    Martin, Thanks for the wonderful description of bryndza. As for it only being made in Slovakia, I m a little confused. When I was working in Bratislava there
    Message 1 of 36 , May 9, 2008
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      Martin,

      Thanks for the wonderful description of bryndza. As for it only being
      made in Slovakia, I'm a little confused. When I was working in
      Bratislava there was a battle going on in the EU courts over whether
      Poland or Slovakia could lay claim to the "original" bryndza.
      According to Wikipedia, both countries won the right, each with a
      slightly different name. More can be read here:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bryndza

      A number of people have mentioned a similar cheese in Germany. This
      cheese, quark (Slovak tvarok) is indeed made from goat's milk but is
      much milder and used, as I recall, mostly in cakes and pastries.

      Paul in NW Florida


      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > > Anyone for a new S-W cheese war? I missed the first one.
      >
      > All right, Ron, and I agree with what you've said. Butter may
      > substitute Philadelphia may substitute peanut butter: they can all be
      > spread on a slice of bread, but they are not similar. Cottage cheese
      > AKA farmer cheese AKA curds with whatever other cheese may substitute
      > bryndza: both cottage cheese and bryndza may be crumbled over halusky,
      > but they will not be similar.
      >
      > "True" bryndza is very (very) sharp, salty, grayish, ground
      > (pin-rolled) semi-spreadable sheep cheese. No marketed cow or goat
      > cheese is remotely close. _Sharp_ here means that it almost burns,
      > not like the bland product called "sharp" cheddar in the supermarket.
      >
      > "True" bryndza has been traditionally marketed as _liptovska' bryndza_
      > (Liptov [County] bryndza), now more often as _ovc~ia_ (sheep) _bryndza_
      >
      > Sheep milk is first coagulated to give mild, edible white sheep cheese
      > (_ovc~i' syr_). That is then aged in warm temperature (until it looks
      > quite unappealing). The unsightly rind that develops is removed and
      > the rest is then cut up, heavily salted, and ground to give it
      > spreadable texture. This process and product is limited to Slovakia
      > (although words related to _bryndza_ are used for other kinds of
      > cheese in other countries, namely Romania).
      >
      > "True" ovcia bryndza is too sharp for most Slovaks to use as is.
      > Before they put in on their bread or halusky, they typically mix it
      > with some double cream to make it smoother and milder.
      >
      > _Letna'_ (summer) and _zimna'_ (winter) bryndza, or just bryndza, is
      > more common in the stores year round. It's probably what most
      > tourists ever see and eat. It is a mixture of a preserved and stored
      > ingredient similar to bryndza as described above and of cow cheese.
      > As a result, it is milder. Either version must contain more than 50%
      > of "true" bryndza. Many Slovaks still find it too sharp and mix it to
      > dilute the sharpness before serving it with halusky.
      >
      > To sum up, if it's from cow or goat milk and not at least 51% sheep
      > milk, if it hasn't been aged and processed until it's very, very
      > sharp, if it isn't gray, it's not anywhere close to bryndza, although
      > it may be a "substitute."
      >
      >
      > Martin
      >
      > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
      >
    • Eve Smith
      Thank you for the tip on buying cheese at Trader Joe s. Was it Lubos that said that? I LOVE that store which is about a 40 minutes drive from my home but I
      Message 36 of 36 , Jun 21, 2011
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        Thank you for the tip on buying cheese at Trader Joe's. Was it Lubos that
        said that? I LOVE that store which is about a 40 minutes drive from my home
        but I will try that Israel feta. Now I need a good recipe. There is
        probably one on your site, right?

        Sorry I haven't been participating much here lately, but do scan the emails
        regularly.

        I hope to attend the Slovak Festival in Cleveland which I believe is in September.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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