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Re: Salat Question

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  • Paul Guzowski
    Hello All; I grew up thinking salad would be served alongside the main course as my mother, who is British, served it that way so I found it a little strange
    Message 1 of 3 , May 7 4:19 AM
      Hello All;

      I grew up thinking salad would be served alongside the main course as my
      mother, who is British, served it that way so I found it a little strange
      that restaurants served it first in the USA. I've since come to the
      conclusion that it's mostly because we rarely eat soup (or anything else for
      that matter) as a first course in the US so serving the salad (and bread)
      first is a way to fill the time gap between ordering and serving the main
      dish.

      When I went to school in France, I was surprised to find that the salad was
      served after the main course unless one was eating a salad as a main course,
      e.g. Salade Niçoise. I was told this was to cleanse the palate and prepare
      it for the cheese course.

      In all the years I lived in Germany, the salad (if you got one) was served
      either a little before or alongside the main course. When I lived in
      Hungary, whether lettuce or pickled cucumbers or pickled peppers or pickled
      beets, it was always served alongside the main course and my
      translator/interpreter said it was to help digest the main course which was
      often cooked with lard. To be honest, I don't remember how it was served in
      Slovakia or Lithuania when I worked in those countries.

      As for what I like for salad, I mainly like any and all kinds of lettuce
      (including arugula/roquette and radichio) but truly enjoy all salads except
      those made with mayonnaise. In my mind, the best salad is that made with
      ingredients fresh from your own garden. We have red and green leaf lettuce
      as well as arugula now in our garden but the peppers and tomatoes won't be
      ready for at least another month.

      Paul in NW Florida
      P.S. The wild southern dewberries (similar to blackberries) are just coming
      ripe here now and they are wonderful.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • skeeter
      I, too, like bean salad and beet salad, but you ll never find them in a restaurant in the US. You have to make your own or get them out of a jar. I know what
      Message 2 of 3 , May 7 5:26 AM
        I, too, like bean salad and beet salad, but you'll never find them in a restaurant in the US. You have to make your own or get them out of a jar.

        I know what you mean about the wild berries. We had wild blueberries, blackberries, elderberries, and strawberries growing in the woods behind our house when I was a kid (old farm land), and they were terrific. If we could get enough elderberries, mom would bake an elderberry pie... the best pie I've ever had!

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Paul Guzowski
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, May 07, 2008 7:19 AM
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Salat Question


        Hello All;

        I grew up thinking salad would be served alongside the main course as my
        mother, who is British, served it that way so I found it a little strange
        that restaurants served it first in the USA. I've since come to the
        conclusion that it's mostly because we rarely eat soup (or anything else for
        that matter) as a first course in the US so serving the salad (and bread)
        first is a way to fill the time gap between ordering and serving the main
        dish.

        When I went to school in France, I was surprised to find that the salad was
        served after the main course unless one was eating a salad as a main course,
        e.g. Salade Niçoise. I was told this was to cleanse the palate and prepare
        it for the cheese course.

        In all the years I lived in Germany, the salad (if you got one) was served
        either a little before or alongside the main course. When I lived in
        Hungary, whether lettuce or pickled cucumbers or pickled peppers or pickled
        beets, it was always served alongside the main course and my
        translator/interpreter said it was to help digest the main course which was
        often cooked with lard. To be honest, I don't remember how it was served in
        Slovakia or Lithuania when I worked in those countries.

        As for what I like for salad, I mainly like any and all kinds of lettuce
        (including arugula/roquette and radichio) but truly enjoy all salads except
        those made with mayonnaise. In my mind, the best salad is that made with
        ingredients fresh from your own garden. We have red and green leaf lettuce
        as well as arugula now in our garden but the peppers and tomatoes won't be
        ready for at least another month.

        Paul in NW Florida
        P.S. The wild southern dewberries (similar to blackberries) are just coming
        ripe here now and they are wonderful.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tom Flynn
        We didn t often eat out in a restaurant when we were in Slovakia except when we were able to convince one or more of our relatives that we would treat them to
        Message 3 of 3 , May 7 6:42 AM
          We didn't often eat out in a restaurant when we were in Slovakia except
          when we were able to convince one or more of our relatives that we would
          treat them to a meal out rather than have them go through the trouble of
          preparing it (which to them seemed to be no problem, we were amazed how
          much they could do even in a tiny kitchen). However, when we did eat
          out and we got the itemized bill, there was an added charge for "obloha"
          which we didn't understand at the time but later figured out was for a
          garnish of vegetables (been awhile, but I think they were some pickled beets,
          and lettuce, maybe other ingredients). Despite my mother knowing Slovak
          (it was her first language, she didn't learn English until entering school
          in the US) we had to look it up in the translating dictionary....it showed
          up as "sky". We took it as an idiom of some type, maybe meaning "overhead"
          or "extra". I mentioned it to one of the relatives once, they just nodded
          knowingly, so I took it to be a usual addition...and we didn't mind the
          serving of vegetables at all, they were quite good.

          On Wed, 7 May 2008, skeeter wrote:

          > I, too, like bean salad and beet salad, but you'll never find them in a restaurant in the US. You have to make your own or get them out of a jar.
          >
          > I know what you mean about the wild berries. We had wild blueberries, blackberries, elderberries, and strawberries growing in the woods behind our house when I was a kid (old farm land), and they were terrific. If we could get enough elderberries, mom would bake an elderberry pie... the best pie I've ever had!
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: Paul Guzowski
          > To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, May 07, 2008 7:19 AM
          > Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Salat Question
          >
          >
          > Hello All;
          >
          > I grew up thinking salad would be served alongside the main course as my
          > mother, who is British, served it that way so I found it a little strange
          > that restaurants served it first in the USA. I've since come to the
          > conclusion that it's mostly because we rarely eat soup (or anything else for
          > that matter) as a first course in the US so serving the salad (and bread)
          > first is a way to fill the time gap between ordering and serving the main
          > dish.
          >
          > When I went to school in France, I was surprised to find that the salad was
          > served after the main course unless one was eating a salad as a main course,
          > e.g. Salade Ni�oise. I was told this was to cleanse the palate and prepare
          > it for the cheese course.
          >
          > In all the years I lived in Germany, the salad (if you got one) was served
          > either a little before or alongside the main course. When I lived in
          > Hungary, whether lettuce or pickled cucumbers or pickled peppers or pickled
          > beets, it was always served alongside the main course and my
          > translator/interpreter said it was to help digest the main course which was
          > often cooked with lard. To be honest, I don't remember how it was served in
          > Slovakia or Lithuania when I worked in those countries.
          >
          > As for what I like for salad, I mainly like any and all kinds of lettuce
          > (including arugula/roquette and radichio) but truly enjoy all salads except
          > those made with mayonnaise. In my mind, the best salad is that made with
          > ingredients fresh from your own garden. We have red and green leaf lettuce
          > as well as arugula now in our garden but the peppers and tomatoes won't be
          > ready for at least another month.
          >
          > Paul in NW Florida
          > P.S. The wild southern dewberries (similar to blackberries) are just coming
          > ripe here now and they are wonderful.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >

          ---------
          Tom Flynn
          I speak only for myself

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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