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Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Class in Johnstown, PA

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  • Cathie McAdams
    Too bad it s so far away (I m near Cleveland, OH). Women who behave seldom make history. ... From: Dennis Ragan To:
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 6, 2008
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      Too bad it's so far away (I'm near Cleveland, OH).


      'Women who behave seldom make history.'



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Dennis Ragan <dragansk@...>
      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, April 6, 2008 11:50:10 AM
      Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Class in Johnstown, PA

      I meant to mention this earlier, but I'm doing a 10-week Slovak
      language & culture class -- through the Slovak Heritage Association of
      the Laurel Highlands -- in Johnstown, PA, for anyone living in this
      area who's interested. 10 Mondays from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at St. Francis
      of Assisi Church, Barron Ave. Our first class was last Monday, but it
      was the introductory class, so it's not too late for anyone who would
      like to start tomorrow (April 7). We cover basic Slovak vocabulary
      and phrases and we'll also learn a little grammar along the way. The
      classes also include discussions on cultural aspects of Slovakia, such
      as Slovak history, genealogy, food and travel. No books to purchase,
      but I'll have numerous there for review, along with music, video,
      maps, and lots more. If we have access to a kitchen, we'll have a
      Slovak (real) halusky dinner at the end of the course.
      Dennis Ragan





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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • J. Edward Polko
      Hi Dennis, The first word that you should know very clearly is the Slovak for washroom. That word is Zacod (spelling?) happy journeys. John e. Polko ... From:
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 6, 2008
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        Hi Dennis,

        The first word that you should know very clearly is the Slovak for washroom.
        That word is Zacod (spelling?)
        happy journeys.
        John e. Polko

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On
        Behalf Of Dennis Ragan
        Sent: April 6, 2008 11:50 AM
        To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Class in Johnstown, PA


        I meant to mention this earlier, but I'm doing a 10-week Slovak
        language & culture class -- through the Slovak Heritage Association of
        the Laurel Highlands -- in Johnstown, PA, for anyone living in this
        area who's interested. 10 Mondays from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at St. Francis
        of Assisi Church, Barron Ave. Our first class was last Monday, but it
        was the introductory class, so it's not too late for anyone who would
        like to start tomorrow (April 7). We cover basic Slovak vocabulary
        and phrases and we'll also learn a little grammar along the way. The
        classes also include discussions on cultural aspects of Slovakia, such
        as Slovak history, genealogy, food and travel. No books to purchase,
        but I'll have numerous there for review, along with music, video,
        maps, and lots more. If we have access to a kitchen, we'll have a
        Slovak (real) halusky dinner at the end of the course.
        Dennis Ragan






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • skeeter
        Ha! That made me laugh. When I went to Mexico, the first three phrases I learned were Una cervesa, por favor (a beer, please), Quantos (how much?), and
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 6, 2008
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          Ha!

          That made me laugh. When I went to Mexico, the first three phrases I learned were "Una cervesa, por favor " (a beer, please), "Quantos" (how much?), and "Donde esta bannos de cabeleros" (where's the men's room).

          You can go to any country and any language, and there are a few essentials you pick up quickly.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: J. Edward Polko
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, April 06, 2008 10:07 PM
          Subject: RE: [Slovak-World] Slovak Class in Johnstown, PA


          Hi Dennis,

          The first word that you should know very clearly is the Slovak for washroom.
          That word is Zacod (spelling?)
          happy journeys.
          John e. Polko

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On
          Behalf Of Dennis Ragan
          Sent: April 6, 2008 11:50 AM
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Slovak-World] Slovak Class in Johnstown, PA

          I meant to mention this earlier, but I'm doing a 10-week Slovak
          language & culture class -- through the Slovak Heritage Association of
          the Laurel Highlands -- in Johnstown, PA, for anyone living in this
          area who's interested. 10 Mondays from 6:30 to 8:30 pm at St. Francis
          of Assisi Church, Barron Ave. Our first class was last Monday, but it
          was the introductory class, so it's not too late for anyone who would
          like to start tomorrow (April 7). We cover basic Slovak vocabulary
          and phrases and we'll also learn a little grammar along the way. The
          classes also include discussions on cultural aspects of Slovakia, such
          as Slovak history, genealogy, food and travel. No books to purchase,
          but I'll have numerous there for review, along with music, video,
          maps, and lots more. If we have access to a kitchen, we'll have a
          Slovak (real) halusky dinner at the end of the course.
          Dennis Ragan

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • J Michutka
          ... Maybe it s cause I m a mom, but one of the first phrases I ve picked up when traveling someplace is come here! Just look for a woman (or a man, but
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
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            On Apr 6, 2008, at 10:49 PM, skeeter wrote:

            >
            > You can go to any country and any language, and there are a few
            > essentials you pick up quickly.

            Maybe it's 'cause I'm a mom, but one of the first phrases I've picked
            up when traveling someplace is "come here!" Just look for a woman
            (or a man, but usually seems to be a woman) with one or more small
            children nearby, and you'll soon hear it--the words vary from
            language to language, but the tone of voice is unmistakable!

            Julie Michutka
            jmm@...

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • J. Edward Polko
            there are many unforseen problems that exist no matter how well you think. In Austria, picture if you will a father and a son jumping up and down so that we
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 7, 2008
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              there are many unforseen problems that exist no matter how well you think.
              In Austria, picture if you will a father and a son jumping up and down so
              that we could give a payment to a non-US non Slovak speaking only German.
              She was telling me where the bank was but that it was closed since it was
              only 6:00 PM. Everything closes at 6:00 in Europe, and from 12:00 noon to
              reopen at 2:00. Any way,back to the Austrian lady. She was starting to
              laugh, when I spotted a small Visa sticker, and then we ran to the room, and
              there was no talking about arm wrestling in just that moment. Another fun
              time that we had was that I wanted to take a shower several hours later. I
              looked for soap and found non there, I went back to my room and took out my
              trusty german/english dictionary and asked the young lady if there was a
              bar of soap that I could have? She looked at me with a questioning voice
              vas ist. By the time I was done , she asked in her best German to wait. 10
              minutes later she came back with a tray and a bowl of soup.and a big smile
              on her face that she had done a good deed for the tourist.
              Best Regards,

              John e. Polko
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On
              Behalf Of J Michutka
              Sent: April 7, 2008 8:39 AM
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Slovak Class in Johnstown, PA



              On Apr 6, 2008, at 10:49 PM, skeeter wrote:

              >
              > You can go to any country and any language, and there are a few
              > essentials you pick up quickly.

              Maybe it's 'cause I'm a mom, but one of the first phrases I've picked
              up when traveling someplace is "come here!" Just look for a woman
              (or a man, but usually seems to be a woman) with one or more small
              children nearby, and you'll soon hear it--the words vary from
              language to language, but the tone of voice is unmistakable!

              Julie Michutka
              jmm@...

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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