Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Czechoslovak cookbook

Expand Messages
  • skeeter
    I got my copy of the Czechoslovak Cookbook by Joza Brizova today from Amazon.com, and I couldn t be happier. Most of my mom s recipes were lost over the
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 31, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I got my copy of the "Czechoslovak Cookbook" by Joza Brizova today from Amazon.com, and I couldn't be happier. Most of my mom's recipes were lost over the years, and I'm apparently the only one left in the family who wants to keep the cooking traditions alive. Goulash, jaternice, sekanice, brambore, knedlicky, zelnicky, kohlrabi,... oh there are just so many that sound good. I can't wait to dive in!

      --skeeter


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • byza7@aol.com
      ... Don t forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will volunteer to be your taste tester. lol David **************Create a Home Theater
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 31, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        ---Hey Skeeter,

        Don't forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will
        volunteer to be your taste tester. lol

        David



        **************Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL
        Home.
        (http://home.aol.com/diy/home-improvement-eric-stromer?video=15&ncid=aolhom00030000000001)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • skeeter
        David-- I m lucky in that regard. Sophie s Choice Pierogis http://polisheats.com/polish-food/online-store/Pierogi.html are made right here in Cleveland, and
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 31, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          David--

          I'm lucky in that regard. Sophie's Choice Pierogis

          http://polisheats.com/polish-food/online-store/Pierogi.html

          are made right here in Cleveland, and easy to come by. I'm partial to the sauerkraut-filled ones, just sauteed in some butter and with some black pepper, and some kielbasa or bratwurst. Once in awhile they have the mushroom pierogis, but not very often. It's soul food for my old-world appetite.

          --skeeter

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: byza7@...
          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:24 PM
          Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook


          ---Hey Skeeter,

          Don't forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will
          volunteer to be your taste tester. lol

          David

          **************Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL
          Home.
          (http://home.aol.com/diy/home-improvement-eric-stromer?video=15&ncid=aolhom00030000000001)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michelle Burke
          Now you ve mentioned my favorite food group! But I have always found Polish pierogies disappointing, like the ones from the West Side Market -- too big, and
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 8, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Now you've mentioned my favorite food group! But I have always found Polish pierogies disappointing, like the ones from the West Side Market -- too big, and too doughy. My mom's and grandma's pierogies were small, triangular pillows, bursting with goodness, boiled in water and then drenched in browned butter and onions. I made them for the first time in twenty years this winter, from the Anniversary Slovak-American Cookbook (available to this day from The First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association -- they have a website). What I particularly love about this cookbook is that it combines 50's American cooking (Jello Delight) with Velkonocna Hlavka (Easter Bread Loaf with Meat -- the recipe starts, "Some cooks boil a calf's head, the scrape off the meat and grind...) (although I confess that I haven't tried either one, and although my grandma made mean Jello cups, I don't think I've ever had Velkonocna Hlavka).

            My sister and I keep our childhood food traditions alive, but my brother (with two kids) and his Massachusetts-born Anglo-Scots wife isn't that interested -- her kids wouldn't touch stuffed cabbage with a ten-foot pole!


            ----- Original Message ----
            From: skeeter <fbican@...>
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:05:58 PM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

            David--

            I'm lucky in that regard. Sophie's Choice Pierogis

            http://polisheats. com/polish- food/online- store/Pierogi. html

            are made right here in Cleveland, and easy to come by. I'm partial to the sauerkraut-filled ones, just sauteed in some butter and with some black pepper, and some kielbasa or bratwurst. Once in awhile they have the mushroom pierogis, but not very often. It's soul food for my old-world appetite.

            --skeeter

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: byza7@...
            To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:24 PM
            Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

            ---Hey Skeeter,

            Don't forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will
            volunteer to be your taste tester. lol

            David

            ************ **Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL
            Home.
            (http://home. aol.com/diy/ home-improvement -eric-stromer? video=15& ncid=aolhom00030 000000001)

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Helen Fedor
            There must have been something in the air this winter. I made my mom s pirohy recipe for the first time in 20-25 years too (some with lekvar and some with
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 15, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              There must have been something in the air this winter. I made my mom's pirohy recipe for the first time in 20-25 years too (some with lekvar and some with tvaroh cheese). I'd forgotten how good they are. I agree with you on the "doughiness" and heaviness of brands like Mrs. T's.

              The Easter Bread Loaf with Meat sounds like the polnina ("stuffing") my mom used to make at Easter, until I saw the bit about the calf's head. My recipe (which I don't make as I'm not that crazy about it) uses ground ham and is more like a heavy quiche filling poured into a pot that's lined with a thin layer of bread dough and baked.

              H



              >>> Michelle Burke <mcmburke@...> 4/8/2008 4:13 PM >>>
              Now you've mentioned my favorite food group! But I have always found Polish pierogies disappointing, like the ones from the West Side Market -- too big, and too doughy. My mom's and grandma's pierogies were small, triangular pillows, bursting with goodness, boiled in water and then drenched in browned butter and onions. I made them for the first time in twenty years this winter, from the Anniversary Slovak-American Cookbook (available to this day from The First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association -- they have a website). What I particularly love about this cookbook is that it combines 50's American cooking (Jello Delight) with Velkonocna Hlavka (Easter Bread Loaf with Meat -- the recipe starts, "Some cooks boil a calf's head, the scrape off the meat and grind...) (although I confess that I haven't tried either one, and although my grandma made mean Jello cups, I don't think I've ever had Velkonocna Hlavka).

              My sister and I keep our childhood food traditions alive, but my brother (with two kids) and his Massachusetts-born Anglo-Scots wife isn't that interested -- her kids wouldn't touch stuffed cabbage with a ten-foot pole!


              ----- Original Message ----
              From: skeeter <fbican@...>
              To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:05:58 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

              David--

              I'm lucky in that regard. Sophie's Choice Pierogis

              http://polisheats. com/polish- food/online- store/Pierogi. html

              are made right here in Cleveland, and easy to come by. I'm partial to the sauerkraut-filled ones, just sauteed in some butter and with some black pepper, and some kielbasa or bratwurst. Once in awhile they have the mushroom pierogis, but not very often. It's soul food for my old-world appetite.

              --skeeter

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: byza7@...
              To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:24 PM
              Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

              ---Hey Skeeter,

              Don't forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will
              volunteer to be your taste tester. lol

              David

              ************ **Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL
              Home.
              (http://home. aol.com/diy/ home-improvement -eric-stromer? video=15& ncid=aolhom00030 000000001)

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Caye Caswick
              Hey Michelle, that s PRECISELY WHY you bring a huge batch of stuffed cabbage to the next Family Event -- you get to eat all the hard work if your nieces and
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 15, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Hey Michelle, that's PRECISELY WHY you bring a huge batch of stuffed cabbage to the next Family Event -- you get to eat all the hard work if your nieces and nephews won't go near it.


                ;-D
                Caye


                Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:
                There must have been something in the air this winter. I made my mom's pirohy recipe for the first time in 20-25 years too (some with lekvar and some with tvaroh cheese). I'd forgotten how good they are. I agree with you on the "doughiness" and heaviness of brands like Mrs. T's.

                The Easter Bread Loaf with Meat sounds like the polnina ("stuffing") my mom used to make at Easter, until I saw the bit about the calf's head. My recipe (which I don't make as I'm not that crazy about it) uses ground ham and is more like a heavy quiche filling poured into a pot that's lined with a thin layer of bread dough and baked.

                H

                >>> Michelle Burke <mcmburke@...> 4/8/2008 4:13 PM >>>
                Now you've mentioned my favorite food group! But I have always found Polish pierogies disappointing, like the ones from the West Side Market -- too big, and too doughy. My mom's and grandma's pierogies were small, triangular pillows, bursting with goodness, boiled in water and then drenched in browned butter and onions. I made them for the first time in twenty years this winter, from the Anniversary Slovak-American Cookbook (available to this day from The First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association -- they have a website). What I particularly love about this cookbook is that it combines 50's American cooking (Jello Delight) with Velkonocna Hlavka (Easter Bread Loaf with Meat -- the recipe starts, "Some cooks boil a calf's head, the scrape off the meat and grind...) (although I confess that I haven't tried either one, and although my grandma made mean Jello cups, I don't think I've ever had Velkonocna Hlavka).

                My sister and I keep our childhood food traditions alive, but my brother (with two kids) and his Massachusetts-born Anglo-Scots wife isn't that interested -- her kids wouldn't touch stuffed cabbage with a ten-foot pole!

                ----- Original Message ----
                From: skeeter <fbican@...>
                To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:05:58 PM
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

                David--

                I'm lucky in that regard. Sophie's Choice Pierogis

                http://polisheats. com/polish- food/online- store/Pierogi. html

                are made right here in Cleveland, and easy to come by. I'm partial to the sauerkraut-filled ones, just sauteed in some butter and with some black pepper, and some kielbasa or bratwurst. Once in awhile they have the mushroom pierogis, but not very often. It's soul food for my old-world appetite.

                --skeeter

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: byza7@...
                To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:24 PM
                Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

                ---Hey Skeeter,

                Don't forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will
                volunteer to be your taste tester. lol

                David

                ************ **Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL
                Home.
                (http://home. aol.com/diy/ home-improvement -eric-stromer? video=15& ncid=aolhom00030 000000001)

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                between 0000-00-00 and 9999-99-99

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Michelle Burke
                Isn t that the truth! LOL! My husband (who has Slavic roots on his mom s side, but she did not cook ethnically like her mother) loves stuffed cabbage and all
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 16, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Isn't that the truth! LOL! My husband (who has Slavic roots on his mom's side, but she did not cook ethnically like her mother) loves stuffed cabbage and all of the other things that we ate growing up. I actually haven't made stuffed cabbage in many years, but we get a fair approximation of a decent stuffed cabbage from our local grocery store/deli (despite the fact that the family owning it is Irish American), and, believe it or not, I actually like the Lean Cuisine version! (The tomato sauce is similar to but not identical to my Mom's.) Any way -- maybe I'll attempt stuffed cabbage myself next winter, for Christmas supper.


                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Caye Caswick <ccaswick@...>
                  To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, April 15, 2008 9:43:34 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook


                  Hey Michelle, that's PRECISELY WHY you bring a huge batch of stuffed cabbage to the next Family Event -- you get to eat all the hard work if your nieces and nephews won't go near it.


                  ;-D
                  Caye


                  Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:
                  There must have been something in the air this winter. I made my mom's pirohy recipe for the first time in 20-25 years too (some with lekvar and some with tvaroh cheese). I'd forgotten how good they are. I agree with you on the "doughiness" and heaviness of brands like Mrs. T's.

                  The Easter Bread Loaf with Meat sounds like the polnina ("stuffing") my mom used to make at Easter, until I saw the bit about the calf's head. My recipe (which I don't make as I'm not that crazy about it) uses ground ham and is more like a heavy quiche filling poured into a pot that's lined with a thin layer of bread dough and baked.

                  H

                  >>> Michelle Burke <mcmburke@yahoo. com> 4/8/2008 4:13 PM >>>
                  Now you've mentioned my favorite food group! But I have always found Polish pierogies disappointing, like the ones from the West Side Market -- too big, and too doughy. My mom's and grandma's pierogies were small, triangular pillows, bursting with goodness, boiled in water and then drenched in browned butter and onions. I made them for the first time in twenty years this winter, from the Anniversary Slovak-American Cookbook (available to this day from The First Catholic Slovak Ladies Association -- they have a website). What I particularly love about this cookbook is that it combines 50's American cooking (Jello Delight) with Velkonocna Hlavka (Easter Bread Loaf with Meat -- the recipe starts, "Some cooks boil a calf's head, the scrape off the meat and grind...) (although I confess that I haven't tried either one, and although my grandma made mean Jello cups, I don't think I've ever had Velkonocna Hlavka).

                  My sister and I keep our childhood food traditions alive, but my brother (with two kids) and his Massachusetts- born Anglo-Scots wife isn't that interested -- her kids wouldn't touch stuffed cabbage with a ten-foot pole!

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: skeeter <fbican@worldnet. att.net>
                  To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:05:58 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

                  David--

                  I'm lucky in that regard. Sophie's Choice Pierogis

                  http://polisheats. com/polish- food/online- store/Pierogi. html

                  are made right here in Cleveland, and easy to come by. I'm partial to the sauerkraut-filled ones, just sauteed in some butter and with some black pepper, and some kielbasa or bratwurst. Once in awhile they have the mushroom pierogis, but not very often. It's soul food for my old-world appetite.

                  --skeeter

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: byza7@...
                  To: Slovak-World@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 8:24 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Slovak-World] Czechoslovak cookbook

                  ---Hey Skeeter,

                  Don't forget to contact me WHEN you cook those periogies. I will
                  volunteer to be your taste tester. lol

                  David

                  ************ **Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL
                  Home.
                  (http://home. aol.com/diy/ home-improvement -eric-stromer? video=15& ncid=aolhom00030 000000001)

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  between 0000-00-00 and 9999-99-99

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.