Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: ako financ kozu

Expand Messages
  • vchromoho
    ... Bible. ... Rusyns are all over the map with their yes : in Slovakia, they generally say hej but some say je (literally, it is ); in Poland, the Lemko
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 29, 2008
      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > > we always said <hej>.
      >
      > Indeed, _hej_ or _hejze_ don't actually exist in Polish or in Czech.
      > It's a specifically Slovak word of agreement. _Ano_ was imported
      > through the ancient versions of the Old-Czech-based language of the
      Bible.
      >

      Rusyns are all over the map with their "yes": in Slovakia, they
      generally say "hej" but some say "je" (literally, "it is"); in Poland,
      the Lemko Rusyns usually say "tak" like in Polish and Ukrainian.

      In Ukraine's Zakarpatska oblast, the native Rusyn dialects mostly
      use "ajno" (looks kind of like Czech!), although a few western-area
      villages say "hej" and the easterns say "tak", although "tak" seems to
      be taking over the whole territory somewhat due to the influence of
      standard Ukrainian. And then of course in Zakarpattia you also
      hear "da" from the middle-aged generation who were more influenced by,
      and even frequently married, Russians who came to Zakarpattia in large
      numbers after World War II when it was annexed by the Soviet Union.
    • Matchett
      Thanks for submitting this. I just finished reading Cry Little Girl , a Tale of the Survival of a Family in Slovakia by Aliza Barak- Ressler. It starts in
      Message 2 of 29 , Mar 1, 2008
        Thanks for submitting this. I just finished reading "Cry Little
        Girl", a Tale of the Survival of a Family in Slovakia by Aliza Barak-
        Ressler.

        It starts in Michalovce where there was a huge population of Jews.
        The family escapes being sent to concentration camps many times, hides
        in the woods in the winter, finds pits where wine barrels where stored
        many years earlier and live there for months, receiving help from a
        good Slovak family and the priest in Jarok (near Nitra).

        Very worth reading. Julia Matchett


        On Feb 29, 2008, at 3:10 PM, LongJohn Wayne wrote:
        >
        > A friend sent this recently, so I thought I would add
        > a post. If this bothers some, just delete it.
        >
        > Chuck
        >
        > A Girl with an Apple
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • LongJohn Wayne
        Martin: I stand corrected. It IS, however, the most religious country that I have visited. Please forgive. Thank you sir, may I have another. ;) Chuck ...
        Message 3 of 29 , Mar 1, 2008
          Martin:

          I stand corrected.

          It IS, however, the most religious country that I have
          visited. Please forgive.

          Thank you sir, may I have another.

          ;)

          Chuck

          --- Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:

          > > It is the most deeply religious country in Europe
          >
          > That is not borne out by comparative surveys. On a
          > 4-tier scale,
          > Slovakia is in the "second tier" in religiosity:
          > less religious than
          > first-tier countries that include (alphabetical
          > order) Austria,
          > Croatia, Ireland, Italy, Poland, Portugal,
          > Switzerland, and others.
          >
          > Slovakia shares the second tier with Finland,
          > Norway, Iceland (closest
          > to Slovakia, both at the "more religious end" in
          > this tier), Latvia,
          > Spain, and others.
          >
          > The third tier includes, e.g. Britain and Germany.
          > The four least
          > religious countries in Europe are the Czech R.,
          > Estonia, France, and
          > the Netherlands.
          >
          >
          > Martin
          >
          > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          >
          >
          >



          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          Looking for last minute shopping deals?
          Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
        • J. Edward Polko
          Hi Folks, Aside from the fact that ano and no mostly mean the same thing. Also the most important word that anyone studying Slovak must know when going to
          Message 4 of 29 , Mar 1, 2008
            Hi Folks,

            Aside from the fact that "ano and no" mostly mean the same thing. Also the
            most important word that anyone studying Slovak must know when going to
            Slovakia is "Zackod(spelling) " or
            "Hayzel (spelling)" which is a coloquialism of zachod. :It is one of the
            most important phrases over there for the new to the Slovak language. I was
            in a most embarassing situation bcause I had always thought that I was
            sufficiently fluent in the language. it means where is the washroom?

            regards, to everyone,

            John e, Polko
            -----Original Message-----
            From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On
            Behalf Of vchromoho
            Sent: March 1, 2008 2:05 AM
            To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: ako financ kozu


            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > > we always said <hej>.
            >
            > Indeed, _hej_ or _hejze_ don't actually exist in Polish or in Czech.
            > It's a specifically Slovak word of agreement. _Ano_ was imported
            > through the ancient versions of the Old-Czech-based language of the
            Bible.
            >

            Rusyns are all over the map with their "yes": in Slovakia, they
            generally say "hej" but some say "je" (literally, "it is"); in Poland,
            the Lemko Rusyns usually say "tak" like in Polish and Ukrainian.

            In Ukraine's Zakarpatska oblast, the native Rusyn dialects mostly
            use "ajno" (looks kind of like Czech!), although a few western-area
            villages say "hej" and the easterns say "tak", although "tak" seems to
            be taking over the whole territory somewhat due to the influence of
            standard Ukrainian. And then of course in Zakarpattia you also
            hear "da" from the middle-aged generation who were more influenced by,
            and even frequently married, Russians who came to Zakarpattia in large
            numbers after World War II when it was annexed by the Soviet Union.






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Martin Votruba
            ... Thanks, Rich. A good example to have that underscores the instability of the words of consent. ... Interesting. It need not be Czech if they use, or
            Message 5 of 29 , Mar 1, 2008
              > Rusyns are all over the map with their "yes"

              Thanks, Rich. A good example to have that underscores the
              "instability" of the words of consent.

              > In Ukraine's Zakarpatska oblast, the native Rusyn dialects mostly
              > use "ajno" (looks kind of like Czech!)

              Interesting. It need not be Czech if they use, or used to use the
              word _aj_ in the sense of "and" or "also." The Czech _ano_ came about
              as a fusion of _a_ (and) + _no_ (polyfunctional). If _aj_ has that
              meaning in Zakarpatska, it would be parallel Rusyn development, not an
              adoption of a foreign word.

              Regardless, there would have to be many Rusyn words with [aj] where
              Czech has a short [a] (or many Rusyn words with [aj] where Slovak has
              a long [a']) for it to be from Czech (possibly via Slovak) rather than
              "native." I'd be interested to know if any of that is the case.


              Martin

              votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
            • Helen Fedor
              Chuck, If you zoom out one notch, Male Ozorovce SE of Parchovany, the 2nd village SE of Secovce. If you keep going to the SE, you ll see Slanske Nove Mesto,
              Message 6 of 29 , Mar 3, 2008
                Chuck,
                If you zoom out one notch, Male Ozorovce SE of Parchovany, the 2nd village SE of Secovce. If you keep going to the SE, you'll see Slanske Nove Mesto, the 3rd village SE of Male Ozorovce.

                H



                >>> LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> 2/29/2008 5:34:10 PM >>>
                Helen:

                I was unable to locate either on Google Maps.

                > Father = Slanske Nove Mesto
                > Mother = Male Ozorovce

                I sent you a Google link of Parchovany to you.

                Chuck


                --- Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

                > I remember hearing the name Parchovany at home, as
                > the village where some family friends lived, but
                > can't remember who it was. Who knows, we could be
                > 32nd cousins, 16 times removed!
                >
                > H
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > >>> LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>
                > 2/29/2008 3:22 PM >>>
                > Helen:
                >
                > I need to check them on a map. My Grandfather
                > emmigrated from Parchovany over 100 years ago. I
                > visited last year. What beautiful country.
                >
                > Perhaps we are related!
                >
                > Chuck
                >
                > --- Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Father = Slanske Nove Mesto
                > > Mother = Male Ozorovce
                > >
                > > H
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > >>> LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...>
                > > 2/29/2008 2:57 PM >>>
                > > Helen:
                > >
                > > What town or area is your family from?
                > >
                > > Chuck
                > >
                > > --- Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > > My family comes from SE of Kosice, i.e. not near
                > > the
                > > > Polish border, but we always said <hej>. I
                > didn't
                > > > know the word <ano> until I started studying the
                > > > standard language.
                > > >
                > > > H
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > >>> William F Brna <wfbrna@...> 2/29/2008
                > > 2:25
                > > > PM >>>
                > > > Martin,
                > > >
                > > > Thanks for the elucidation. I was referring to
                > > the
                > > > fact that I learned
                > > > Slovak from my parents who came to this country
                > in
                > > > 1908. I had assumed
                > > > that this was common usage 100 years ago which
                > is
                > > > how I learned it. It
                > > > also reminds me of a discussion we had on my
                > first
                > > > visit to Slovakia. We
                > > > were sitting around the table after supper
                > making
                > > > small talk. Everyone
                > > > was using "ano". I told them that it was not in
                > > > common usage in the US.
                > > > When they asked what we used to express the
                > > > affirmative, I told them that
                > > > we said "hejz~e".
                > > >
                > > > The Polish influence was related to me by my
                > > cousin
                > > > who lived just a few
                > > > kms away from the Polish border.
                > > >
                > > > William
                > > >
                > > > On Fri, 29 Feb 2008 19:08:49 -0000 "Martin
                > > Votruba"
                > > > <votrubam@...>
                > > > writes:
                > > > > used "i" for "and", rather than the currently
                > > used
                > > > "a".
                > > >
                > > > Yes, _i_ has been only regional for a long time,
                > > > also present in East
                > > > Slovakia. But it's not necessarily Polish
                > > influence,
                > > > it's also
                > > > standard usage in Czech, Rusyn, and other Slavic
                > > > languages. It
                > > > probably disappeared in much of Slovakia rather
                > > than
                > > > being imported.
                > > > Especially the Slovak journalists still use _i_
                > a
                > > > lot in their writing
                > > > although most never say it.
                > > >
                > > > > "umrel" for "zomrel" among others.
                > > >
                > > > Again, not necessarily from Polish. u- is also
                > > used
                > > > in Czech,
                > > > Russian, and some stylists have actually
                > advocated
                > > > the use of _umrel_
                > > > as the more traditional version in Slovak. Both
                > > > _umrel_ and _zomrel_
                > > > are accepted as correct.
                > > >
                > > > Martin
                > > >
                > > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > > > removed]
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                > > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
                > > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                > Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                > Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                >
                http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
                >
                >



                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
                http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.