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  • Russell McCoy
    . . . in case anyone wants to see more pictures from my trip. You know, my Slovak friends often commented that they were disappointed with the fact that The
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 21, 2008
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      . . . in case anyone wants to see more pictures from my trip.

      You know, my Slovak friends often commented that they were
      disappointed with the fact that The Czech Republic and Slovakia
      split. Apparently, it was an agreement between two governments and
      didn't have the approval of the majority of the people.

      Anyway, enjoy!

      Russ
      Djibouti, Horn of Africa
      http://travldawrld.blogspot.com/
    • helene cincebeaux
      Dear SW Friends Tancuj, tancuj Can anyone tell me when this beloved Slovak folk song first began to be played? or about how old it is. helene
      Message 2 of 29 , Feb 21, 2008
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        Dear SW Friends

        Tancuj, tancuj

        Can anyone tell me when this beloved Slovak folk song
        first began to be played? or about how old it is.

        helene


        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
        http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
      • Caye Caswick
        Helene: Great question -- it s my favorite old folk song. Mom said as a kid at church weddings I d spin and spin till I giggled and fell down dizzy. I am sure
        Message 3 of 29 , Feb 21, 2008
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          Helene:

          Great question -- it's my favorite old folk song. Mom said as a kid at church weddings I'd spin and spin till I giggled and fell down dizzy.

          I am sure it's 100's of years old, and bet Jozef would know -- I'll ask the relatives in Brezina if they have any idea as well.


          Caye


          helene cincebeaux <helenezx@...> wrote:

          Dear SW Friends

          Tancuj, tancuj

          Can anyone tell me when this beloved Slovak folk song
          first began to be played? or about how old it is.

          helene

          __________________________________________________________
          Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
          http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs





          ---------------------------------
          Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Martin Votruba
          ... Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and tunes of about 160,000
          Message 4 of 29 , Feb 22, 2008
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            > Tancuj, tancuj
            >
            > about how old it is.

            Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
            considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
            tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
            total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
            approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.

            The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
            old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
            songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
            1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.

            In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
            already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
            sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
            of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
            indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
            distinct garments.


            Martin

            votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
          • Gregory J Kopchak
            Martin: As the 1920 s started every American home got a Victrola. Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market. Most record companies did an
            Message 5 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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              Martin:

              As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.

              Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.

              Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.

              Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
              record of the period.

              Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
              had a copy.

              If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
              almost every Slovak-American artist.

              If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
              is very hard to find.

              Greg






              --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > > Tancuj, tancuj
              > >
              > > about how old it is.
              >
              > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
              > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
              > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
              > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
              > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
              >
              > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
              > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
              > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
              > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
              >
              > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
              > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
              > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
              > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
              > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
              > distinct garments.
              >
              >
              > Martin
              >
              > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
              >
            • Helen Fedor
              The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla s recording of Tancuj, tancuj on line!! Go to
              Message 6 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj, tancuj" on line!! Go to < http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison)) > to listen.

                H
                P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.



                >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                Martin:

                As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.

                Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.

                Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.

                Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                record of the period.

                Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                had a copy.

                If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                almost every Slovak-American artist.

                If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                is very hard to find.

                Greg






                --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > > Tancuj, tancuj
                > >
                > > about how old it is.
                >
                > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
                > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                >
                > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
                > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
                > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
                > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                >
                > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
                > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
                > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
                > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                > distinct garments.
                >
                >
                > Martin
                >
                > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                >
              • J Michutka
                ... This link didn t take me to the recording, but there was a search box on the page, and I typed in tancuj and it took me right to the entry where I could
                Message 7 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                  On Feb 26, 2008, at 10:14 AM, Helen Fedor wrote:

                  > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                  > tancuj" on line!! Go to < http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?
                  > ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID
                  > +edison)) > to listen.
                  >

                  This link didn't take me to the recording, but there was a search box
                  on the page, and I typed in "tancuj" and it took me right to the
                  entry where I could click on the recording.

                  Julie Michutka
                  jmm@...
                • Helen Fedor
                  The link is split up between 3 lines and only the first line is hot-linked . You have to paste in all 3 parts (a pain), but it will take you straight there.
                  Message 8 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                    The link is split up between 3 lines and only the first line is "hot-linked". You have to paste in all 3 parts (a pain), but it will take you straight there. Be sure that there are no blank spaces, (but not ">") or it won't work.

                    H



                    >>> J Michutka <jmm@...> 2/26/2008 10:45 AM >>>

                    On Feb 26, 2008, at 10:14 AM, Helen Fedor wrote:

                    > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                    > tancuj" on line!! Go to < http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?
                    > ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID
                    > +edison)) > to listen.
                    >

                    This link didn't take me to the recording, but there was a search box
                    on the page, and I typed in "tancuj" and it took me right to the
                    entry where I could click on the recording.

                    Julie Michutka
                    jmm@...
                  • Gregory J Kopchak
                    The words Baritone in Czecho-Slovak is on the label of the record. In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was being politically correct
                    Message 9 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                      The words "Baritone in Czecho-Slovak" is on the label of the record.

                      In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was
                      being politically correct on their label.

                      I wonder how many Slovak-World members have a copy of the
                      record in their attic?

                      Greg






                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                      tancuj" on line!! Go to <
                      http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison))
                      > to listen.
                      >
                      > H
                      > P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in
                      "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                      > Martin:
                      >
                      > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                      >
                      > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                      >
                      > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                      >
                      > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                      > record of the period.
                      >
                      > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                      > had a copy.
                      >
                      > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                      > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                      >
                      > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                      > is very hard to find.
                      >
                      > Greg
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > > Tancuj, tancuj
                      > > >
                      > > > about how old it is.
                      > >
                      > > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                      > > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                      > > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
                      > > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                      > > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                      > >
                      > > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
                      > > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
                      > > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
                      > > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                      > >
                      > > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                      > > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
                      > > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
                      > > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
                      > > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                      > > distinct garments.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Martin
                      > >
                      > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                      > >
                      >
                    • Martin Votruba
                      Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for the recording. It s useful to have it. The language of the song is from the Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko
                      Message 10 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                        Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for the recording.
                        It's useful to have it. The language of the song is from the
                        Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                        the mark as usual.

                        As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I didn't know that
                        places its origin to (any number of years, centuries) before the 1840s.


                        Martin

                        votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                      • Helen Fedor
                        I realize that those words are on the label, but if you look farther down in the record for the item, under Subjects , you see: Czechs--United States--Music.
                        Message 11 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                          I realize that those words are on the label, but if you look farther down in the record for the item, under "Subjects", you see:

                          Czechs--United States--Music.
                          Slovaks--United States--Music.
                          Songs, Czech.
                          Dance--Songs and music.
                          Songs (Medium voice)

                          The first line should be deleted, and the third line should have "Slovak" where it has "Czech".

                          H



                          >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 02/26/08 12:53 PM >>>

                          The words "Baritone in Czecho-Slovak" is on the label of the record.

                          In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was
                          being politically correct on their label.

                          I wonder how many Slovak-World members have a copy of the
                          record in their attic?

                          Greg






                          --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                          tancuj" on line!! Go to <
                          http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison))
                          > to listen.
                          >
                          > H
                          > P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in
                          "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                          > Martin:
                          >
                          > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                          >
                          > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                          >
                          > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                          >
                          > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                          > record of the period.
                          >
                          > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                          > had a copy.
                          >
                          > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                          > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                          >
                          > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                          > is very hard to find.
                          >
                          > Greg
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > > Tancuj, tancuj
                          > > >
                          > > > about how old it is.
                          > >
                          > > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                          > > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                          > > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
                          > > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                          > > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                          > >
                          > > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
                          > > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
                          > > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
                          > > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                          > >
                          > > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                          > > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
                          > > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
                          > > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
                          > > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                          > > distinct garments.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Martin
                          > >
                          > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                          > >
                          >
                        • Helen Fedor
                          I found this short bio of Havrilla at . Date of Birth 7 June 1891, Presov (Eperjes), Hungary, Austria-Hungary [now
                          Message 12 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                            I found this short bio of Havrilla at < http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0369906/bio >.

                            "Date of Birth
                            7 June 1891, Presov (Eperjes), Hungary, Austria-Hungary [now Presov, Slovakia]
                            Date of Death
                            7 December 1952, Englewood, New Jersey, USA
                            Mini Biography
                            Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received an award from American Academy of Arts and Letters terming him the country's best radio announcer. Also worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe Studios."

                            H


                            >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 02/26/08 12:53 PM >>>

                            The words "Baritone in Czecho-Slovak" is on the label of the record.

                            In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was
                            being politically correct on their label.

                            I wonder how many Slovak-World members have a copy of the
                            record in their attic?

                            Greg






                            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                            tancuj" on line!! Go to <
                            http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison))
                            > to listen.
                            >
                            > H
                            > P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in
                            "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                            > Martin:
                            >
                            > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                            >
                            > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                            >
                            > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                            >
                            > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                            > record of the period.
                            >
                            > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                            > had a copy.
                            >
                            > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                            > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                            >
                            > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                            > is very hard to find.
                            >
                            > Greg
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > > Tancuj, tancuj
                            > > >
                            > > > about how old it is.
                            > >
                            > > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                            > > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                            > > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
                            > > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                            > > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                            > >
                            > > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
                            > > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
                            > > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
                            > > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                            > >
                            > > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                            > > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
                            > > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
                            > > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
                            > > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                            > > distinct garments.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > Martin
                            > >
                            > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                            > >
                            >
                          • Helen Fedor
                            There s quite a bit out there on the Web about Havrilla, including that he was born in Pres~ov and was [A] Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received an award
                            Message 13 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                              There's quite a bit out there on the Web about Havrilla, including that he was born in Pres~ov and was "[A] Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received an award from American Academy of Arts and Letters terming him the country's best radio announcer. Also worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe Studios." Hmmm, sounds like a candiate for our "Slovaks in America" page.

                              If you go to < http://durium.opweb.nl/durium5000h.htm > and scroll down almost half way, you can see a ca.1946 photo of Havrilla.

                              H




                              >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 02/26/08 1:29 PM >>>
                              Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for the recording.
                              It's useful to have it. The language of the song is from the
                              Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                              the mark as usual.

                              As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I didn't know that
                              places its origin to (any number of years, centuries) before the 1840s.


                              Martin

                              votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                            • Helen Fedor
                              What s the evidence? H ... Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for the recording. It s useful to have it. The language of the song is from the
                              Message 14 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                What's the evidence?

                                H

                                >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 02/26/08 1:29 PM >>>
                                Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for the recording.
                                It's useful to have it. The language of the song is from the
                                Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                                the mark as usual.

                                As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I didn't know that
                                places its origin to (any number of years, centuries) before the 1840s.


                                Martin

                                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                              • Gregory J Kopchak
                                Does the LOC have a sheet music collection? Many times the sheet music has liner notes on the song or at minimum credit for words and music. I know the song
                                Message 15 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                  Does the LOC have a sheet music collection?

                                  Many times the sheet music has "liner notes" on the song
                                  or at minimum credit for words and music.

                                  I know the song with words and music appeared in a book of
                                  Slovak Folk songs published in America circa 1922.

                                  I don't remember the name of the song book.

                                  Greg



                                  --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I found this short bio of Havrilla at <
                                  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0369906/bio >.
                                  >
                                  > "Date of Birth
                                  > 7 June 1891, Presov (Eperjes), Hungary, Austria-Hungary [now Presov,
                                  Slovakia]
                                  > Date of Death
                                  > 7 December 1952, Englewood, New Jersey, USA
                                  > Mini Biography
                                  > Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received an award from American
                                  Academy of Arts and Letters terming him the country's best radio
                                  announcer. Also worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe
                                  Studios."
                                  >
                                  > H
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 02/26/08 12:53 PM >>>
                                  >
                                  > The words "Baritone in Czecho-Slovak" is on the label of the record.
                                  >
                                  > In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was
                                  > being politically correct on their label.
                                  >
                                  > I wonder how many Slovak-World members have a copy of the
                                  > record in their attic?
                                  >
                                  > Greg
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                                  > tancuj" on line!! Go to <
                                  >
                                  http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison))
                                  > > to listen.
                                  > >
                                  > > H
                                  > > P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in
                                  > "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                                  > > Martin:
                                  > >
                                  > > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                                  > >
                                  > > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                                  > >
                                  > > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                                  > >
                                  > > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                                  > > record of the period.
                                  > >
                                  > > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                                  > > had a copy.
                                  > >
                                  > > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                                  > > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                                  > >
                                  > > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                                  > > is very hard to find.
                                  > >
                                  > > Greg
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@>
                                  > > wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > > Tancuj, tancuj
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > about how old it is.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                                  > > > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                                  > > > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap,
                                  though: the
                                  > > > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                                  > > > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250
                                  years
                                  > > > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one
                                  of the
                                  > > > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer
                                  book from
                                  > > > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                                  > > > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing
                                  of the
                                  > > > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a
                                  span
                                  > > > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green
                                  gown"
                                  > > > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                                  > > > distinct garments.
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Martin
                                  > > >
                                  > > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • Martin Votruba
                                  ... The last stanza complains about a robota supervisor (the labor-tax that farmers needed to do for noblemen). This is adjusted for Standard Slovak: Co
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    > What's the evidence?

                                    The last stanza complains about a "robota" supervisor (the "labor-tax"
                                    that farmers needed to do for noblemen). This is adjusted for
                                    Standard Slovak:

                                    Co to mame za draba,
                                    ze nam fajront nedava?
                                    On nam fajront musi dat,
                                    ked by ho mal cert zobrat.

                                    That was abolished in 1848.


                                    Martin

                                    votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                  • J. Edward Polko
                                    Hello All, If you listen to the radio station that I listen to on the internet KBPS
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                      Hello All,

                                      If you listen to the radio station that I listen to on the internet>KBPS< in
                                      Oregon you would find that the adherence to: Czhecoslovakia versus Czech
                                      and Slovak are a various as there are stars in the sky.

                                      Copy to KBPS on sepatate email.

                                      Regards as always

                                      John e. Polko
                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com]On
                                      Behalf Of Gregory J Kopchak
                                      Sent: February 26, 2008 12:53 PM
                                      To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [Slovak-World] Re: Tancuj, tancuj - how old is it?



                                      The words "Baritone in Czecho-Slovak" is on the label of the record.

                                      In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was
                                      being politically correct on their label.

                                      I wonder how many Slovak-World members have a copy of the
                                      record in their attic?

                                      Greg

                                      --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                                      tancuj" on line!! Go to <
                                      http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@ba
                                      nd(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison))
                                      > to listen.
                                      >
                                      > H
                                      > P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in
                                      "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                                      > Martin:
                                      >
                                      > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                                      >
                                      > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                                      >
                                      > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                                      >
                                      > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                                      > record of the period.
                                      >
                                      > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                                      > had a copy.
                                      >
                                      > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                                      > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                                      >
                                      > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                                      > is very hard to find.
                                      >
                                      > Greg
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@>
                                      > wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > > Tancuj, tancuj
                                      > > >
                                      > > > about how old it is.
                                      > >
                                      > > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                                      > > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                                      > > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap, though: the
                                      > > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                                      > > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                                      > >
                                      > > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250 years
                                      > > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one of the
                                      > > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer book from
                                      > > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                                      > >
                                      > > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                                      > > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing of the
                                      > > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a span
                                      > > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green gown"
                                      > > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                                      > > distinct garments.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Martin
                                      > >
                                      > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                      > >
                                      >






                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Matchett
                                      Greg, I checked my inherited Victrola and found a record put out by Columbia. It s very old, fairly worn out, and doesn t have the singer s name on it :(
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                        Greg, I checked my inherited Victrola and found a record put out by
                                        Columbia. It's very old, fairly worn out, and doesn't have the
                                        singer's name on it :( It just says Slovak "Tancuj, Tancuj,
                                        Vykrucaj" hudba se zpevem.

                                        When I took that Slovak class at Comenius in '02, the teacher had us
                                        singing "Tancuj, Tancuj" in class. It seems hard to believe, it would
                                        be hard to find in Slovakia. Julia Matchett

                                        >
                                        > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                                        >
                                        > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                                        >
                                        > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                                        >
                                        > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                                        > record of the period.
                                        >
                                        > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                                        > had a copy.
                                        >
                                        > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                                        > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                                        >
                                        > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                                        > is very hard to find.
                                        >



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Helen Fedor
                                        What s a ? It sounds like it came from German. H ... The last stanza complains about a robota supervisor (the labor-tax that farmers needed to do
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          What's a <fajront>? It sounds like it came from German.

                                          H



                                          >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 2/26/2008 2:15 PM >>>
                                          > What's the evidence?

                                          The last stanza complains about a "robota" supervisor (the "labor-tax"
                                          that farmers needed to do for noblemen). This is adjusted for
                                          Standard Slovak:

                                          Co to mame za draba,
                                          ze nam fajront nedava?
                                          On nam fajront musi dat,
                                          ked by ho mal cert zobrat.

                                          That was abolished in 1848.


                                          Martin

                                          votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                        • Helen Fedor
                                          Greg, The song is listed in three song books (including a 1997 _Girl Scout Pocket Song Book_!), but these items are held in the Performing Arts Reading Room,
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                            Greg,
                                            The song is listed in three song books (including a 1997 _Girl Scout Pocket Song Book_!), but these items are held in the Performing Arts Reading Room, and I'd have to go over there to look at it (their items don't circulate).

                                            H



                                            >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 2/26/2008 2:00 PM >>>
                                            Does the LOC have a sheet music collection?

                                            Many times the sheet music has "liner notes" on the song
                                            or at minimum credit for words and music.

                                            I know the song with words and music appeared in a book of
                                            Slovak Folk songs published in America circa 1922.

                                            I don't remember the name of the song book.

                                            Greg



                                            --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I found this short bio of Havrilla at <
                                            http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0369906/bio >.
                                            >
                                            > "Date of Birth
                                            > 7 June 1891, Presov (Eperjes), Hungary, Austria-Hungary [now Presov,
                                            Slovakia]
                                            > Date of Death
                                            > 7 December 1952, Englewood, New Jersey, USA
                                            > Mini Biography
                                            > Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received an award from American
                                            Academy of Arts and Letters terming him the country's best radio
                                            announcer. Also worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe
                                            Studios."
                                            >
                                            > H
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@...> 02/26/08 12:53 PM >>>
                                            >
                                            > The words "Baritone in Czecho-Slovak" is on the label of the record.
                                            >
                                            > In 1921 there was only Czechoslovakia and the record label was
                                            > being politically correct on their label.
                                            >
                                            > I wonder how many Slovak-World members have a copy of the
                                            > record in their attic?
                                            >
                                            > Greg
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Helen Fedor" <hfed@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > The Library of Congress has Mr. Havrilla's recording of "Tancuj,
                                            > tancuj" on line!! Go to <
                                            >
                                            http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/papr:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(edrs+65004r))+@field(COLLID+edison))
                                            > > to listen.
                                            > >
                                            > > H
                                            > > P.S. I just saw that they have it listed as being in
                                            > "Czecho-Slovak". I've taken up the battle to get it fixed.
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > >>> "Gregory J Kopchak" <greg@> 2/26/2008 9:13 AM >>>
                                            > > Martin:
                                            > >
                                            > > As the 1920's started every American home got a Victrola.
                                            > >
                                            > > Record publishers tried to gain a share of the immigrant market.
                                            > >
                                            > > Most record companies did an international label with ethnic songs.
                                            > >
                                            > > Tancuj, tancuj by Alois Havrilla was the best selling Slovak
                                            > > record of the period.
                                            > >
                                            > > Most Slovak-Americans grew up with the song on 78 disk. Every home
                                            > > had a copy.
                                            > >
                                            > > If you look at CD's today, you will find Tancuj, tancuj done by
                                            > > almost every Slovak-American artist.
                                            > >
                                            > > If you look through Slovak folk CD's done in Slovakia the song
                                            > > is very hard to find.
                                            > >
                                            > > Greg
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > --- In Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@>
                                            > > wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > > Tancuj, tancuj
                                            > > > >
                                            > > > > about how old it is.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Only songs whose origin (author, place, time) is unknown are
                                            > > > considered folk songs. The Slovak Ethnology Institute has texts and
                                            > > > tunes of about 160,000 such songs. There's some overlap,
                                            though: the
                                            > > > total includes lyrics of what can be considered versions of,
                                            > > > approximately, the same song, and variations on "the same" tune.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > The general assumption is that most of them are at least 200-250
                                            years
                                            > > > old, many probably much older. For instance, a version of one
                                            of the
                                            > > > songs still current today was found hand-written in a prayer
                                            book from
                                            > > > 1490, but it's not known when exactly someone recorded it there.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > In rare instances, a historical reference suggests that a song must
                                            > > > already have been around by a certain century. There's nothing
                                            of the
                                            > > > sort in Tancuj, tancuj... The reference to a stove allows for a
                                            span
                                            > > > of hundreds of years, the reference to a Gypsy woman in a "green
                                            gown"
                                            > > > indicates that it originated at a time when some of them wore such
                                            > > > distinct garments.
                                            > > >
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Martin
                                            > > >
                                            > > > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • helene cincebeaux
                                            Thanks Martin and everyone - that means it could be used in album of songs from Civil War times - glad to pass the word along. helene ...
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                              Thanks Martin and everyone - that means it could be
                                              used in album of songs from Civil War times - glad to
                                              pass the word along.

                                              helene

                                              --- Martin Votruba <votrubam@...> wrote:

                                              > Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for
                                              > the recording.
                                              > It's useful to have it. The language of the song is
                                              > from the
                                              > Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so
                                              > "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                                              > the mark as usual.
                                              >
                                              > As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I
                                              > didn't know that
                                              > places its origin to (any number of years,
                                              > centuries) before the 1840s.
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > Martin
                                              >
                                              > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >



                                              ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                              Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
                                              http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
                                            • Martin Votruba
                                              ... It s colloquial for the moment when (less often: time after) you finish work: Kedy bude fajront?/Kedy budeme mat fajront? When do we knock off? A mame
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                                > What's a <fajront>?

                                                It's colloquial for the moment when (less often: time after) you
                                                finish work:

                                                Kedy bude fajront?/Kedy budeme mat fajront? "When do we knock off?"
                                                A mame fajront. "And we're finished [and now have time off]."


                                                Martin

                                                votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                              • LongJohn Wayne
                                                Reminds me of a dinner I had in Prague by a restaurant of the same name. MOST excellent! Slovacko I could not find a website, however. ...
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Reminds me of a dinner I had in Prague by a restaurant
                                                  of the same name. MOST excellent! Slovacko

                                                  I could not find a website, however.


                                                  --- Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

                                                  > There's quite a bit out there on the Web about
                                                  > Havrilla, including that he was born in Pres~ov and
                                                  > was "[A] Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received
                                                  > an award from American Academy of Arts and Letters
                                                  > terming him the country's best radio announcer. Also
                                                  > worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe
                                                  > Studios." Hmmm, sounds like a candiate for our
                                                  > "Slovaks in America" page.
                                                  >
                                                  > If you go to <
                                                  > http://durium.opweb.nl/durium5000h.htm > and scroll
                                                  > down almost half way, you can see a ca.1946 photo of
                                                  > Havrilla.
                                                  >
                                                  > H
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 02/26/08
                                                  > 1:29 PM >>>
                                                  > Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for
                                                  > the recording.
                                                  > It's useful to have it. The language of the song is
                                                  > from the
                                                  > Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so
                                                  > "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                                                  > the mark as usual.
                                                  >
                                                  > As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I
                                                  > didn't know that
                                                  > places its origin to (any number of years,
                                                  > centuries) before the 1840s.
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > Martin
                                                  >
                                                  > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >



                                                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                                  Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                  Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
                                                • Vladimir Linder
                                                  My pages are up an running again. Visit: www.slovakheritage.org www.lindervideo.com www.liptovskateplicka.com soon there will be more:
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Feb 26, 2008
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                                                    My pages are up an running again.

                                                    Visit:

                                                    www.slovakheritage.org

                                                    www.lindervideo.com

                                                    www.liptovskateplicka.com

                                                    soon there will be more:

                                                    vladimirlinderphotography.com

                                                    slovakheritagelive.com

                                                    vladimirlinder.com

                                                    julialinderova.com

                                                    penziondolinka.com

                                                    slovakgenealogy.com

                                                    slovakiagenealogy.com

                                                    VIEW 129 OF MY VIDEOS AT YOTUBE: http://www.youtube.com/vladi49

                                                    39256 video viewers did so far

                                                    Vladi
                                                  • Helen Fedor
                                                    Go to Google and type in alois havrilla as a phrase. H ... Reminds me of a dinner I had in Prague by a restaurant of the same name. MOST excellent!
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Feb 27, 2008
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      Go to Google and type in "alois havrilla" as a phrase.

                                                      H



                                                      >>> LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> 2/27/2008 12:30 AM >>>
                                                      Reminds me of a dinner I had in Prague by a restaurant
                                                      of the same name. MOST excellent! Slovacko

                                                      I could not find a website, however.


                                                      --- Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

                                                      > There's quite a bit out there on the Web about
                                                      > Havrilla, including that he was born in Pres~ov and
                                                      > was "[A] Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received
                                                      > an award from American Academy of Arts and Letters
                                                      > terming him the country's best radio announcer. Also
                                                      > worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe
                                                      > Studios." Hmmm, sounds like a candiate for our
                                                      > "Slovaks in America" page.
                                                      >
                                                      > If you go to <
                                                      > http://durium.opweb.nl/durium5000h.htm > and scroll
                                                      > down almost half way, you can see a ca.1946 photo of
                                                      > Havrilla.
                                                      >
                                                      > H
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 02/26/08
                                                      > 1:29 PM >>>
                                                      > Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for
                                                      > the recording.
                                                      > It's useful to have it. The language of the song is
                                                      > from the
                                                      > Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so
                                                      > "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                                                      > the mark as usual.
                                                      >
                                                      > As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I
                                                      > didn't know that
                                                      > places its origin to (any number of years,
                                                      > centuries) before the 1840s.
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > Martin
                                                      >
                                                      > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >



                                                      ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                                      Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                                      Find them fast with Yahoo! Search. http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
                                                    • Armata, Joseph R
                                                      My own feeling about Tancuj Tancuj is that the melody can t be that old. It sounds entirely too modern and Western in structure. I d be surprised if it s much
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Feb 27, 2008
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        My own feeling about Tancuj Tancuj is that the melody can't be that old. It sounds entirely too modern and Western in structure. I'd be surprised if it's much older than the late 19th century, more likely around the turn of the 19th/20th centuries. Dance tunes are the most likely to change; the really archaic tunes are found in things like haying songs, pasturing songs, ritual songs, or ballads.

                                                        The lyrics on the other hand could go back farther, either in whole or in part. People are always adapting lyrics to new melodies, inventing new verses to tack on to existing ones, or mixing lyrics from one song with another, especially when you get past the first few verses that everyone knows well.

                                                        I found a version of Tancuj Tancuj in a book (Slovenske Spevy) that has a completely different tune. It's marked as being from Novohrad county. But that tune doesn't sound very old to me either.

                                                        Joe
                                                      • Mark Sabol
                                                        Helen, I think he meant he couldn t find a website for the Slovacko restaurant he was reminded of. It s here: http://www.restaurace-slovacko.cz/ Mark ...
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Feb 27, 2008
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          Helen,

                                                          I think he meant he couldn't find a website for the "Slovacko" restaurant he was reminded of. It's here:

                                                          http://www.restaurace-slovacko.cz/

                                                          Mark
                                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                                          From: Helen Fedor
                                                          To: Slovak-World@yahoogroups.com
                                                          Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2008 8:24 AM
                                                          Subject: [SPAM] Re: [Slovak-World] Re: Tancuj, tancuj - how old is it?


                                                          Go to Google and type in "alois havrilla" as a phrase.

                                                          H

                                                          >>> LongJohn Wayne <daxthewarrior@...> 2/27/2008 12:30 AM >>>
                                                          Reminds me of a dinner I had in Prague by a restaurant
                                                          of the same name. MOST excellent! Slovacko

                                                          I could not find a website, however.

                                                          --- Helen Fedor <hfed@...> wrote:

                                                          > There's quite a bit out there on the Web about
                                                          > Havrilla, including that he was born in Pres~ov and
                                                          > was "[A] Veteran Radio announcer, in 1935 received
                                                          > an award from American Academy of Arts and Letters
                                                          > terming him the country's best radio announcer. Also
                                                          > worked for Universal, Paramount Pictorial and Pathe
                                                          > Studios." Hmmm, sounds like a candiate for our
                                                          > "Slovaks in America" page.
                                                          >
                                                          > If you go to <
                                                          > http://durium.opweb.nl/durium5000h.htm > and scroll
                                                          > down almost half way, you can see a ca.1946 photo of
                                                          > Havrilla.
                                                          >
                                                          > H
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > >>> "Martin Votruba" <votrubam@...> 02/26/08
                                                          > 1:29 PM >>>
                                                          > Thank you, Gerg, for the information, and Helen for
                                                          > the recording.
                                                          > It's useful to have it. The language of the song is
                                                          > from the
                                                          > Zahorie--Moravske Slovacko region, so
                                                          > "Czecho-Slovak" is not as off
                                                          > the mark as usual.
                                                          >
                                                          > As to the song's age, this recording has a stanza I
                                                          > didn't know that
                                                          > places its origin to (any number of years,
                                                          > centuries) before the 1840s.
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > Martin
                                                          >
                                                          > votruba "at" pitt "dot" edu
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          >

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                                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                        • Helen Fedor
                                                          I checked in a couple of modern books of music and no info was given about Tancuj, tancuj . I ll look at some other, older books when I can get over to the
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Feb 29, 2008
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                                                            I checked in a couple of modern books of music and no info was given about "Tancuj, tancuj". I'll look at some other, older books when I can get over to the Music Reading Room again.

                                                            H



                                                            >>> "Armata, Joseph R" <armata+@...> 2/27/2008 8:57 AM >>>

                                                            My own feeling about Tancuj Tancuj is that the melody can't be that old. It sounds entirely too modern and Western in structure. I'd be surprised if it's much older than the late 19th century, more likely around the turn of the 19th/20th centuries. Dance tunes are the most likely to change; the really archaic tunes are found in things like haying songs, pasturing songs, ritual songs, or ballads.

                                                            The lyrics on the other hand could go back farther, either in whole or in part. People are always adapting lyrics to new melodies, inventing new verses to tack on to existing ones, or mixing lyrics from one song with another, especially when you get past the first few verses that everyone knows well.

                                                            I found a version of Tancuj Tancuj in a book (Slovenske Spevy) that has a completely different tune. It's marked as being from Novohrad county. But that tune doesn't sound very old to me either.

                                                            Joe
                                                          • LongJohn Wayne
                                                            A Slovak immigrant went to the DMV to apply for a driver s license. First, of course, he had to take an eye sight test The optician showed him a card with the
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Apr 13, 2008
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                                                              A Slovak immigrant went to the DMV to apply for a
                                                              driver's license. First, of course, he had to take an
                                                              eye sight test The optician showed him a card with the
                                                              letters 'C Z W I X N O S T A C Z.'

                                                              'Can you read this?' the optician asked.

                                                              'Read it?' the Slovak guy replied, 'I know the guy.'

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